Trade Agreements

trade-agreements
TitleActionFR DocPublishedAgency NameExcerptsAbstractHTMLPDF
TitleActionFR DocPublishedAgency NameExcerptsAbstractHTMLPDF
Changes to the In-Bond ProcessRule2017-2049509/28/2017Homeland Security DepartmentThis final rule adopts, with several changes, proposed amendments to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations regarding changes to the in-bond process published in the Federal Register on February 22, 2012. The in-bond proc … This final rule adopts, with several changes, proposed amendments to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations regarding changes to the in-bond process published in the Federal Register on February 22, 2012. The in-bond process allows imported merchandise to be entered at one U.S. port of entry without appraisement or payment of duties and transported by a bonded carrier to another U.S. port of entry or other authorized destination provided all statutory and regulatory conditions are met. At the destination port, the merchandise is entered or exported. The changes in this rule, including the automation of the in-bond process, will enhance CBP's ability to regulate and track in-bond merchandise and ensure that in- bond merchandise is properly entered or exported. This document addresses comments received in response to the proposed rule and makes several changes in response to the comments that further simplify and facilitate the in-bond process.changes-to-the-in-bond-processFR-Doc-2017-20495
Electronic Information for Cargo Exported From the United States; Technical AmendmentsRule2017-1454907/13/2017Homeland Security DepartmentThis final rule amends U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations regarding the requirements to provide data for certain exported cargo to conform to current requirements. Various CBP regulations regarding exported cargo refer to o … This final rule amends U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations regarding the requirements to provide data for certain exported cargo to conform to current requirements. Various CBP regulations regarding exported cargo refer to outdated regulations or requirements of the U.S. Census Bureau, including the requirement to submit a paper Shipper's Export Declaration (SED). The U.S. Census Bureau's Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR) have been amended to eliminate the SED and to require that the information that was previously provided on the paper SED be filed electronically through the Automated Export System. This rule amends the CBP regulations to incorporate the current requirements. The rule also makes related conforming changes as well as non-substantive editorial and nomenclature changes.electronic-information-for-cargo-exported-from-the-united-states-technical-amendmentsFR-Doc-2017-14549
Regulatory Implementation of the Centers of Excellence and ExpertiseRule2016-2971912/20/2016Homeland Security DepartmentIn 2012, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) developed a test to incrementally transition the operational trade functions that traditionally reside with port directors to the Centers of Excellence and Expertise (Centers). The purp … In 2012, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) developed a test to incrementally transition the operational trade functions that traditionally reside with port directors to the Centers of Excellence and Expertise (Centers). The purpose of the test was to broaden the ability of the Centers to make decisions by waiving certain identified regulations to the extent necessary to provide the Center directors, who manage the Centers, with the authority to make the decisions normally reserved for the port directors. At this time, CBP is prepared to end the test and establish the Centers as a permanent organizational component of the agency and to transition certain additional trade functions to the Centers. This rule amends the CBP regulations on an interim basis to implement this organizational change by: Defining the Centers and the Center directors; amending the definition for port directors to distinguish their functions from those of the Center directors; identifying the Center management offices; explaining the process by which importers will be assigned to Centers; providing the importer with an appeals process for its Center assignment; identifying the regulatory functions that will be transitioned from the port directors to the Center directors and those that will be jointly carried out by the port directors and the Center directors; and providing clarification in applicable regulations that payments and documents may continue to be submitted at the ports of entry or electronically.regulatory-implementation-of-the-centers-of-excellence-and-expertiseFR-Doc-2016-29719
Prohibition on Importation of Jadeite or Rubies Mined or Extracted From Burma, and Articles of Jewelry Containing Jadeite or Rubies Mined or Extracted From BurmaRule2016-2005708/23/2016Homeland Security DepartmentThis document amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (``CBP'') regulations to update the provisions relating to the prohibition on importation of jadeite or rubies mined or extracted from Burma, and articles of jewelry containin … This document amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (``CBP'') regulations to update the provisions relating to the prohibition on importation of jadeite or rubies mined or extracted from Burma, and articles of jewelry containing jadeite or rubies mined or extracted from Burma, following the expiration of the Burmese Freedom and Democracy Act of 2003, as amended by the Tom Lantos Block Burmese JADE (Junta's Anti-Democratic Efforts) Act of 2008. The CBP regulations are amended to reflect the import prohibitions set forth in Executive Order 13651 of August 6, 2013.prohibition-on-importation-of-jadeite-or-rubies-mined-or-extracted-from-burma-and-articles-ofFR-Doc-2016-20057
North American Free Trade Agreement; Preference OverrideProposed Rule2016-1608807/08/2016Homeland Security DepartmentThe United States, Canada and Mexico have agreed to liberalize provisions of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) preference rules of origin that relate to certain goods, including certain spices. However, such liberalizatio … The United States, Canada and Mexico have agreed to liberalize provisions of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) preference rules of origin that relate to certain goods, including certain spices. However, such liberalization cannot take effect unless U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) amends its regulations to allow the NAFTA preference override to apply to certain spice products and other food products. This document proposes such an amendment.north-american-free-trade-agreement-preference-overrideFR-Doc-2016-16088
United States-Australia Free Trade AgreementRule2016-0062801/15/2016Homeland Security DepartmentThis document adopts as a final rule, with one change, interim amendments to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations that were published in the Federal Register on February 10, 2015, as CBP Dec. 15-03, to implement the … This document adopts as a final rule, with one change, interim amendments to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations that were published in the Federal Register on February 10, 2015, as CBP Dec. 15-03, to implement the preferential tariff treatment and other customs-related provisions of the United States-Australia Free Trade Agreement.united-states-australia-free-trade-agreementFR-Doc-2016-00628
Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) Filings for Electronic Entry/Entry Summary (Cargo Release and Related Entry)Rule2015-2572910/13/2015Homeland Security DepartmentThis document amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations to reflect that on November 1, 2015, the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) will be a CBP-authorized Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) System. This … This document amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations to reflect that on November 1, 2015, the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) will be a CBP-authorized Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) System. This regulatory document informs the public that the Automated Commercial System (ACS) is being phased out as a CBP-authorized EDI System for the processing electronic entry and entry summary filings (also known as entry filings). ACE will replace the Automated Commercial System (ACS) as the CBP-authorized EDI system for processing commercial trade data. This document also announces the conclusion of the ACE Cargo Release and the Entry Summary, Accounts and Revenue tests with regard to the entry and entry summary requirements that are now part of the CBP regulations.automated-commercial-environment-ace-filings-for-electronic-entryentry-summary-cargo-release-andFR-Doc-2015-25729
Documentation Related to Goods Imported From U.S. Insular PossessionsRule2015-0277602/11/2015Homeland Security DepartmentThis final rule amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations to eliminate the requirement that a customs official at the port of export verify and sign CBP Form 3229, Certificate of Origin for U.S. Insular Possessi … This final rule amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations to eliminate the requirement that a customs official at the port of export verify and sign CBP Form 3229, Certificate of Origin for U.S. Insular Possessions, and to require only that the importer present this form, upon CBP's request, rather than with each entry as is currently required. The importer is still required to maintain CBP Form 3229 in its possession or may be subject to the assessment of a recordkeeping penalty if it cannot be produced.documentation-related-to-goods-imported-from-us-insular-possessionsFR-Doc-2015-02776
United States-Australia Free Trade AgreementRule2015-0272002/10/2015Homeland Security DepartmentThis rule amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations on an interim basis to implement the preferential tariff treatment and other customs-related provisions of the United States- Australia Free Trade Agreement entered … This rule amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations on an interim basis to implement the preferential tariff treatment and other customs-related provisions of the United States- Australia Free Trade Agreement entered into by the United States and the Commonwealth of Australia.united-states-australia-free-trade-agreementFR-Doc-2015-02720
African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and Generalized System of Preferences and Trade Benefits Under AGOARule2014-1169205/27/2014Homeland Security DepartmentThis document adopts as a final rule, with some changes, interim amendments to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations which were published in the Federal Register on October 5, 2000, as T.D. 00-67, and later am … This document adopts as a final rule, with some changes, interim amendments to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations which were published in the Federal Register on October 5, 2000, as T.D. 00-67, and later amended by T.D. 03-15 published in the Federal Register on March 21, 2003, to implement the trade benefit provisions for sub-Saharan Africa contained in Title I of the Trade and Development Act of 2000, as amended. The trade benefits under Title I, also referred to as the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), apply to sub-Saharan African countries designated by the President and involve: The extension of duty-free treatment under the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) to non-textile articles normally excluded from GSP duty-free treatment that are not import-sensitive; and the entry of specific textile and apparel articles free of duty and free of any quantitative limits. The regulatory amendments adopted as a final rule in this document reflect and clarify the statutory standards for preferential tariff treatment under the AGOA, as amended by section 3108 of the Trade Act of 2002 and include other amendments necessitated by passage of the AGOA Acceleration Act of 2004 and the Africa Investment Incentive Act of 2006. This final rule includes specific documentary, procedural and other related requirements that must be met in order to obtain preferential treatment. This document also adopts as a final rule interim amendments to the CBP regulations implementing the GSP which were included in T.D. 00-67 to conform those regulations to previous amendments to the GSP statute. Moreover, this document adopts as a final rule other changes to the AGOA implementing regulations made by T.D. 03-15 to clarify several issues that arose after their original publication.african-growth-and-opportunity-act-agoa-and-generalized-system-of-preferences-and-trade-benefitsFR-Doc-2014-11692
United States-Panama Trade Promotion AgreementRule2014-1157605/21/2014Homeland Security DepartmentThis document adopts as a final rule interim amendments to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations which were published in the Federal Register on October 23, 2013, as CBP Dec. 13- 17, to implement the preferential t … This document adopts as a final rule interim amendments to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations which were published in the Federal Register on October 23, 2013, as CBP Dec. 13- 17, to implement the preferential tariff treatment and other customs- related provisions of the United States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement.united-states-panama-trade-promotion-agreementFR-Doc-2014-11576
Documentation Related to Goods Imported From U.S. Insular PossessionsProposed Rule2014-0048501/14/2014Homeland Security DepartmentThis document proposes to amend the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations to eliminate the requirement that a customs official at the port of export verify and sign CBP Form 3229, Certificate of Origin for U.S. Insular … This document proposes to amend the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations to eliminate the requirement that a customs official at the port of export verify and sign CBP Form 3229, Certificate of Origin for U.S. Insular Possessions, and to require only that the importer present this form, upon CBP's request, rather than with each entry as is currently required. CBP believes that these amendments will serve to streamline the certification process and modernize the entry process by making it more efficient, as it will reduce the overall administrative burden on the importing trade as well as on CBP. The importer is still required to maintain CBP Form 3229 in its possession or may be subject to the assessment of a recordkeeping penalty if it cannot be produced.documentation-related-to-goods-imported-from-us-insular-possessionsFR-Doc-2014-00485
United States-Panama Trade Promotion AgreementRule2013-2389710/23/2013Homeland Security DepartmentThis rule amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations on an interim basis to implement the preferential tariff treatment and other customs-related provisions of the United States- Panama Trade Promotion Agreement … This rule amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations on an interim basis to implement the preferential tariff treatment and other customs-related provisions of the United States- Panama Trade Promotion Agreement entered into by the United States and the Republic of Panama.united-states-panama-trade-promotion-agreementFR-Doc-2013-23897
United States-Colombia Trade Promotion AgreementRule2013-2383710/01/2013Homeland Security DepartmentThis document adopts as a final rule, with some changes, interim amendments to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations which were published in the Federal Register on September 26, 2012, as CBP Dec. 12-16, to impleme … This document adopts as a final rule, with some changes, interim amendments to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations which were published in the Federal Register on September 26, 2012, as CBP Dec. 12-16, to implement the preferential tariff treatment and other customs-related provisions of the United States- Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement.united-states-colombia-trade-promotion-agreementFR-Doc-2013-23837
United States-Korea Free Trade AgreementRule2013-1284905/30/2013Homeland Security DepartmentThis document adopts as a final rule, with two changes, interim amendments to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (``CBP'') regulations which were published in the Federal Register on March 19, 2012, as CBP Dec. 12-03, to impleme … This document adopts as a final rule, with two changes, interim amendments to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (``CBP'') regulations which were published in the Federal Register on March 19, 2012, as CBP Dec. 12-03, to implement the preferential tariff treatment and other customs-related provisions of the United States-Korea Free Trade Agreement entered into by the United States and the Republic of Korea.united-states-korea-free-trade-agreementFR-Doc-2013-12849
Technical Corrections to U.S. Customs and Border Protection RegulationsRule2012-2963212/10/2012Homeland Security DepartmentU.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) periodically reviews its regulations to ensure that they are current, correct, and consistent. Through this review process, CBP has discovered a number of discrepancies. This document amends … U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) periodically reviews its regulations to ensure that they are current, correct, and consistent. Through this review process, CBP has discovered a number of discrepancies. This document amends various sections of title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations (19 CFR) to correct those discrepancies.technical-corrections-to-us-customs-and-border-protection-regulationsFR-Doc-2012-29632
Informal Entry Limit and Removal of a Formal Entry RequirementRule2012-2919312/06/2012Homeland Security DepartmentCurrently, for any merchandise valued over $2,000, CBP requires importers to provide a surety bond, complete CBP form 7501, and pay a minimum of $25 in Merchandise Processing Fees (MPF). The final rule increases the limit, from $2,000 … Currently, for any merchandise valued over $2,000, CBP requires importers to provide a surety bond, complete CBP form 7501, and pay a minimum of $25 in Merchandise Processing Fees (MPF). The final rule increases the limit, from $2,000 to $2,500, for which merchandise may qualify for an ``informal entry'', thereby eliminating the need for a surety bond, expediting the customs clearance process, and reducing the required MPF amount to $2 (assuming the entries are filed electronically). CBP is increasing the informal entry limit to mitigate the effects of inflation and in addition, to meet a commitment of the Beyond the Border Initiative between the United States and Canada, to increase and harmonize the value thresholds to $2,500 for expedited customs clearance from the current levels of $2,000 for the United States and $1,600 for Canada. This document also removes the language requiring formal entry for certain articles that were formerly subject to absolute quotas under the Agreement on Textiles and Clothing because CBP no longer needs to require formal entries for these articles. This document also makes a technical conforming amendment to reflect a recent statutory amendment that increased the ad valorem Merchandise Processing Fee (MPF) from 0.21 percent to 0.3464 percent. Finally, this document makes non- substantive editorial and nomenclature changes.informal-entry-limit-and-removal-of-a-formal-entry-requirementFR-Doc-2012-29193
United States-Peru Trade Promotion AgreementRule2012-2566810/18/2012Homeland Security DepartmentThis document adopts as a final rule, with one change, interim amendments to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations which were published in the Federal Register on November 3, 2011, as CBP Dec. 11-22, to implement the … This document adopts as a final rule, with one change, interim amendments to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations which were published in the Federal Register on November 3, 2011, as CBP Dec. 11-22, to implement the preferential tariff treatment and other customs-related provisions of the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement.united-states-peru-trade-promotion-agreementFR-Doc-2012-25668
United States-Colombia Trade Promotion AgreementRule2012-2360409/26/2012Homeland Security DepartmentThis rule amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations on an interim basis to implement the preferential tariff treatment and other customs-related provisions of the United States- Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement … This rule amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations on an interim basis to implement the preferential tariff treatment and other customs-related provisions of the United States- Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement entered into by the United States and the Republic of Colombia.united-states-colombia-trade-promotion-agreementFR-Doc-2012-23604
Technical Corrections Relating to the Rules of Origin for Goods Imported Under the NAFTA and for Textile and Apparel ProductsRule2012-2349909/25/2012Homeland Security DepartmentThis document sets forth technical corrections to part 102 of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations to reflect recent changes in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States. The affected provisions in part 10 … This document sets forth technical corrections to part 102 of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations to reflect recent changes in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States. The affected provisions in part 102 of title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations which are based in part on specified changes in tariff classification, comprise a codified system used for determining the country of origin of goods imported under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), determining whether an imported good is a new or different article of commerce under the United States-Morocco Free Trade Agreement and the United States- Bahrain Free Trade Agreement, and for the country of origin of textile and apparel products (other than those of Israel).technical-corrections-relating-to-the-rules-of-origin-for-goods-imported-under-the-nafta-and-forFR-Doc-2012-23499
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