Fuel Economy

fuel-economy
TitleActionFR DocPublishedAgency NameExcerptsAbstractHTMLPDF
TitleActionFR DocPublishedAgency NameExcerptsAbstractHTMLPDF
Guide Concerning Fuel Economy Advertising for New AutomobilesRule2017-1986909/19/2017Federal Trade CommissionThe Federal Trade Commission (``FTC'' or ``Commission'') issues final amendments to the Guide Concerning Fuel Economy Advertising for New Automobiles (``Fuel Economy Guide'' or ``Guide'') to address advertising claims prevalent in the … The Federal Trade Commission (``FTC'' or ``Commission'') issues final amendments to the Guide Concerning Fuel Economy Advertising for New Automobiles (``Fuel Economy Guide'' or ``Guide'') to address advertising claims prevalent in the market and harmonize with current Environmental Protection Agency (``EPA'') and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (``NHTSA'') fuel economy labeling rules.guide-concerning-fuel-economy-advertising-for-new-automobilesFR-Doc-2017-19869
Civil PenaltiesRule2016-3113612/28/2016Transportation DepartmentOn July 5, 2016, NHTSA published an interim final rule updating the maximum civil penalty amounts for violations of statutes and regulations administered by NHTSA, pursuant to the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improv … On July 5, 2016, NHTSA published an interim final rule updating the maximum civil penalty amounts for violations of statutes and regulations administered by NHTSA, pursuant to the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015. This decision responds to a petition for partial reconsideration of that interim final rule. After carefully considering the issues raised, the Agency grants some aspects of the petition, and denies other aspects. This decision amends the relevant regulatory text accordingly. This decision also responds to a petition for rulemaking on a similar topic.civil-penaltiesFR-Doc-2016-31136
Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles-Phase 2Rule2016-2120310/25/2016Environmental Protection AgencyEPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, are establishing rules for a comprehensive Phase 2 Heavy-Duty (HD) National Program that will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fuel consumption from new on-road med … EPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, are establishing rules for a comprehensive Phase 2 Heavy-Duty (HD) National Program that will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fuel consumption from new on-road medium- and heavy-duty vehicles and engines. NHTSA's fuel consumption standards and EPA's carbon dioxide (CO2) emission standards are tailored to each of four regulatory categories of heavy-duty vehicles: Combination tractors; trailers used in combination with those tractors; heavy-duty pickup trucks and vans; and vocational vehicles. The rule also includes separate standards for the engines that power combination tractors and vocational vehicles. Certain requirements for control of GHG emissions are exclusive to the EPA program. These include EPA's hydrofluorocarbon standards to control leakage from air conditioning systems in vocational vehicles and EPA's nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) standards for heavy-duty engines. Additionally, NHTSA is addressing misalignment between the Phase 1 EPA GHG standards and the NHTSA fuel efficiency standards to virtually eliminate the differences. This action also includes certain EPA- specific provisions relating to control of emissions of pollutants other than GHGs. EPA is finalizing non-GHG emission standards relating to the use of diesel auxiliary power units installed in new tractors. In addition, EPA is clarifying the classification of natural gas engines and other gaseous-fueled heavy-duty engines. EPA is also finalizing technical amendments to EPA rules that apply to emissions of non-GHG pollutants from light-duty motor vehicles, marine diesel engines, and other nonroad engines and equipment. Finally, EPA is requiring that engines from donor vehicles installed in new glider vehicles meet the emission standards applicable in the year of assembly of the new glider vehicle, including all applicable standards for criteria pollutants, with limited exceptions for small businesses and for other special circumstances.greenhouse-gas-emissions-and-fuel-efficiency-standards-for-medium--and-heavy-duty-engines-andFR-Doc-2016-21203
Guide Concerning Fuel Economy Advertising for New AutomobilesProposed Rule2016-1309806/06/2016Federal Trade CommissionThe Federal Trade Commission (``FTC'' or ``Commission'') seeks comments on proposed amendments to the Guide Concerning Fuel Economy Advertising for New Automobiles (``Fuel Economy Guide'' or ``Guide'') to reflect current Environmenta … The Federal Trade Commission (``FTC'' or ``Commission'') seeks comments on proposed amendments to the Guide Concerning Fuel Economy Advertising for New Automobiles (``Fuel Economy Guide'' or ``Guide'') to reflect current Environmental Protection Agency (``EPA'') and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (``NHTSA'') fuel economy labeling rules and to consider advertising claims prevalent in the market.guide-concerning-fuel-economy-advertising-for-new-automobilesFR-Doc-2016-13098
Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles-Phase 2Proposed Rule2015-1550007/13/2015Environmental Protection AgencyEPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, are each proposing rules to establish a comprehensive Phase 2 Heavy- Duty (HD) National Program that will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fuel consumption for new … EPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, are each proposing rules to establish a comprehensive Phase 2 Heavy- Duty (HD) National Program that will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fuel consumption for new on-road heavy-duty vehicles. This technology-advancing program would phase in over the long-term, beginning in the 2018 model year and culminating in standards for model year 2027, responding to the President's directive on February 18, 2014, to develop new standards that will take us well into the next decade. NHTSA's proposed fuel consumption standards and EPA's proposed carbon dioxide (CO2) emission standards are tailored to each of four regulatory categories of heavy-duty vehicles: Combination tractors; trailers used in combination with those tractors; heavy-duty pickup trucks and vans; and vocational vehicles. The proposal also includes separate standards for the engines that power combination tractors and vocational vehicles. Certain proposed requirements for control of GHG emissions are exclusive to EPA programs. These include EPA's proposed hydrofluorocarbon standards to control leakage from air conditioning systems in vocational vehicles, and EPA's proposed nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) standards for heavy-duty engines. Additionally, NHTSA is addressing misalignment in the Phase 1 standards between EPA and NHTSA to ensure there are no differences in compliance standards between the agencies. In an effort to promote efficiency, the agencies are also proposing to amend their rules to modify reporting requirements, such as the method by which manufacturers submit pre-model, mid-model, and supplemental reports. EPA's proposed HD Phase 2 GHG emission standards are authorized under the Clean Air Act and NHTSA's proposed HD Phase 2 fuel consumption standards authorized under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. These standards would begin with model year 2018 for trailers under EPA standards and 2021 for all of the other heavy-duty vehicle and engine categories. The agencies estimate that the combined standards would reduce CO2 emissions by approximately 1 billion metric tons and save 1.8 billion barrels of oil over the life of vehicles and engines sold during the Phase 2 program, providing over $200 billion in net societal benefits. As noted, the proposal also includes certain EPA-specific provisions relating to control of emissions of pollutants other than GHGs. EPA is seeking comment on non- GHG emission standards relating to the use of auxiliary power units installed in tractors. In addition, EPA is proposing to clarify the classification of natural gas engines and other gaseous-fueled heavy- duty engines, and is proposing closed crankcase standards for emissions of all pollutants from natural gas heavy-duty engines. EPA is also proposing technical amendments to EPA rules that apply to emissions of non-GHG pollutants from light-duty motor vehicles, marine diesel engines, and other nonroad engines and equipment. Finally, EPA is proposing to require that rebuilt engines installed in new incomplete vehicles meet the emission standards applicable in the year of assembly, including all applicable standards for criteria pollutants.greenhouse-gas-emissions-and-fuel-efficiency-standards-for-medium--and-heavy-duty-engines-andFR-Doc-2015-15500
Amendments Related to: Tier 3 Motor Vehicle Emission and Fuel Standards, Nonroad Engine and Equipment Programs, and MARPOL Annex VI ImplementationRule2015-0284602/19/2015Environmental Protection AgencyThe Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is taking direct final action on several amendments involving technical clarifications for different mobile source regulations. First, we are making a variety of corrections to the Tier 3 mot … The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is taking direct final action on several amendments involving technical clarifications for different mobile source regulations. First, we are making a variety of corrections to the Tier 3 motor vehicle emission and fuel standards. These changes generally correct or clarify various provisions from the Tier 3 rule without expanding the Tier 3 program or otherwise making substantive changes. Second, we are revising the test procedures and compliance provisions for nonroad spark-ignition engines at or below 19 kW (and for the corresponding nonroad equipment) to conform to current practices. The changes to evaporative emission test procedures also apply to some degree to other types of nonroad equipment powered by volatile liquid fuels. Third, we are addressing an ambiguity regarding permissible design approaches for portable fuel containers meeting evaporative emission standards. Fourth, we are revising the regulations to more carefully align with current requirements that apply to marine vessels with diesel engines as specified under MARPOL Annex VI. Fifth, we are correcting typographical errors in regulatory changes finalized in the Voluntary Quality Assurance Program rulemaking. This rulemaking action is not expected to result in any significant changes in regulatory burdens or costs.amendments-related-to-tier-3-motor-vehicle-emission-and-fuel-standards-nonroad-engine-and-equipmentFR-Doc-2015-02846
Amendments Related to: Tier 3 Motor Vehicle Emission and Fuel Standards, Nonroad Engine and Equipment Programs, and MARPOL Annex VI ImplementationProposed Rule2015-0284502/19/2015Environmental Protection AgencyThe Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing this action on several amendments involving technical clarifications for different mobile source regulations. First, we are making a variety of corrections to the Tier 3 motor v … The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing this action on several amendments involving technical clarifications for different mobile source regulations. First, we are making a variety of corrections to the Tier 3 motor vehicle emission and fuel standards. These changes generally correct or clarify various provisions from the Tier 3 rule without expanding the Tier 3 program or otherwise making substantive changes. Second, we are revising the test procedures and compliance provisions for nonroad spark-ignition engines at or below 19 kW (and for the corresponding nonroad equipment) to conform to current practices. The changes to evaporative emission test procedures also apply to some degree to other types of nonroad equipment powered by volatile liquid fuels. Third, we are addressing an ambiguity regarding permissible design approaches for portable fuel containers meeting evaporative emission standards. Fourth, we are revising the regulations to more carefully align with current requirements that apply to marine vessels with diesel engines as specified under MARPOL Annex VI. Fifth, we are correcting typographical errors in regulatory changes finalized in the Voluntary Quality Assurance Program rulemaking. In the ``Rules and Regulations'' section of this Federal Register, we are taking direct final action without a prior proposed rule. If we receive no adverse comment, we will not take further action on this proposed rule.amendments-related-to-tier-3-motor-vehicle-emission-and-fuel-standards-nonroad-engine-and-equipmentFR-Doc-2015-02845
Control of Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles: Tier 3 Motor Vehicle Emission and Fuel StandardsRule2014-0695404/28/2014Environmental Protection AgencyThis action establishes more stringent vehicle emissions standards and will reduce the sulfur content of gasoline beginning in 2017, as part of a systems approach to addressing the impacts of motor vehicles and fuels on air quality and … This action establishes more stringent vehicle emissions standards and will reduce the sulfur content of gasoline beginning in 2017, as part of a systems approach to addressing the impacts of motor vehicles and fuels on air quality and public health. The gasoline sulfur standard will make emission control systems more effective for both existing and new vehicles, and will enable more stringent vehicle emissions standards. The vehicle standards will reduce both tailpipe and evaporative emissions from passenger cars, light-duty trucks, medium-duty passenger vehicles, and some heavy-duty vehicles. This will result in significant reductions in pollutants such as ozone, particulate matter, and air toxics across the country and help state and local agencies in their efforts to attain and maintain health-based National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Motor vehicles are an important source of exposure to air pollution both regionally and near roads. These vehicle standards are intended to harmonize with California's Low Emission Vehicle program, thus creating a federal vehicle emissions program that will allow automakers to sell the same vehicles in all 50 states. The vehicle standards will be implemented over the same timeframe as the greenhouse gas/fuel efficiency standards for light- duty vehicles (promulgated by EPA and the National Highway Safety Administration in 2012), as part of a comprehensive approach toward regulating emissions from motor vehicles.control-of-air-pollution-from-motor-vehicles-tier-3-motor-vehicle-emission-and-fuel-standardsFR-Doc-2014-06954
Alternative Fuel Transportation Program; Alternative Fueled Vehicle Credit Program Modification and Other AmendmentsRule2014-0604403/21/2014Energy DepartmentPursuant to section 133 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), DOE is finalizing a rule that revises regulations on the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (AFTP or the Program). This final rule establishes … Pursuant to section 133 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), DOE is finalizing a rule that revises regulations on the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (AFTP or the Program). This final rule establishes regulations on the allocation of marketable credits for the acquisition of EISA-specified electric drive vehicles and for investments in qualified alternative fuel infrastructure, qualified alternative fuel non-road equipment, and relevant emerging technologies. DOE also is promulgating modifications to the exemption process and the Alternative Compliance option, as well as a number of technical and other revisions that will make the Program regulations clearer.alternative-fuel-transportation-program-alternative-fueled-vehicle-credit-program-modification-andFR-Doc-2014-06044
Heavy-Duty Engine and Vehicle and Nonroad Technical AmendmentsRule2013-1988008/16/2013Environmental Protection AgencyBecause EPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, received adverse comment on certain elements of the Heavy-Duty Engine and Vehicle and Nonroad Technical Amendments direct final rule published on June 17, 2013, we a … Because EPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, received adverse comment on certain elements of the Heavy-Duty Engine and Vehicle and Nonroad Technical Amendments direct final rule published on June 17, 2013, we are withdrawing those elements of the direct final rule and republishing the affected sections without those elements.heavy-duty-engine-and-vehicle-and-nonroad-technical-amendmentsFR-Doc-2013-19880
Heavy-Duty Engine and Vehicle, and Nonroad Technical AmendmentsRule2013-1198006/17/2013Environmental Protection AgencyEPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, are each adopting corrections to provisions in our respective Medium- and Heavy-Duty Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Fuel Efficiency final rule issued on September 15, 201 … EPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, are each adopting corrections to provisions in our respective Medium- and Heavy-Duty Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Fuel Efficiency final rule issued on September 15, 2011. These amendments eliminate duplicative reporting requirements, reduce inadvertent minor differences between the EPA and NHTSA programs regarding such matters as voluntary early model year compliance, better align testing procedures to market realities, and reduce unnecessary testing burdens. This action also separately amends several regulations exclusive to EPA by: adjusting the provisions of the replacement engine exemption, expanding EPA's discretion to allow greater flexibility under the Transition Program for Equipment Manufacturers related to the Tier 4 standards for nonroad diesel engines, specifying multiple versions of the applicable SAE standard for demonstrating that fuel lines for nonroad spark-ignition engines above 19 kilowatts meet permeation requirements, and allowing for the use of the ethanol-based test fuel specified by the California Air Resources Board for nonroad spark-ignition engines at or below 19 kilowatts. Some of the individual EPA-only provisions of this action may have minor impacts on the costs and emission reductions of the underlying regulatory programs amended in this action, though in most cases these are simple technical amendments. For those provisions that may have a minor impact on the costs or benefits of the amended regulatory program, any potential impacts would be small and we have not attempted to quantify the potential changes.heavy-duty-engine-and-vehicle-and-nonroad-technical-amendmentsFR-Doc-2013-11980
Control of Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles: Tier 3 Motor Vehicle Emission and Fuel StandardsProposed Rule2013-0850005/21/2013Environmental Protection AgencyThis action would establish more stringent vehicle emissions standards and reduce the sulfur content of gasoline beginning in 2017, as part of a systems approach to addressing the impacts of motor vehicles and fuels on air quality and … This action would establish more stringent vehicle emissions standards and reduce the sulfur content of gasoline beginning in 2017, as part of a systems approach to addressing the impacts of motor vehicles and fuels on air quality and public health. The proposed gasoline sulfur standard would make emission control systems more effective for both existing and new vehicles, and would enable more stringent vehicle emissions standards. The proposed vehicle standards would reduce both tailpipe and evaporative emissions from passenger cars, light-duty trucks, medium-duty passenger vehicles, and some heavy-duty vehicles. This would result in significant reductions in pollutants such as ozone, particulate matter, and air toxics across the country and help state and local agencies in their efforts to attain and maintain health-based National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Motor vehicles are an important source of exposure to air pollution both regionally and near roads. These proposed vehicle standards are intended to harmonize with California's Low Emission Vehicle program, thus creating a federal vehicle emissions program that would allow automakers to sell the same vehicles in all 50 states. The proposed vehicle standards would be implemented over the same timeframe as the greenhouse gas/fuel efficiency standards for light-duty vehicles, as part of a comprehensive approach toward regulating emissions from motor vehicles.control-of-air-pollution-from-motor-vehicles-tier-3-motor-vehicle-emission-and-fuel-standardsFR-Doc-2013-08500
2017 and Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Corporate Average Fuel Economy StandardsRule2012-2564110/18/2012Transportation DepartmentThis document contains corrections to the final rule regulation which was published in the Federal Register of Monday, October 15, 2012 (77 FR 62624). The final rule established fuel economy standards for light-duty vehicles under th … This document contains corrections to the final rule regulation which was published in the Federal Register of Monday, October 15, 2012 (77 FR 62624). The final rule established fuel economy standards for light-duty vehicles under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), as amended by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA), 49 U.S.C. 32901 et seq.2017-and-later-model-year-light-duty-vehicle-greenhouse-gas-emissions-and-corporate-average-fuelFR-Doc-2012-25641
2017 and Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Corporate Average Fuel Economy StandardsProposed Rule2011-3035812/01/2011Environmental Protection AgencyEPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, are issuing this joint proposal to further reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve fuel economy for light-duty vehicles for model years 2017-2025. This proposal extends … EPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, are issuing this joint proposal to further reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve fuel economy for light-duty vehicles for model years 2017-2025. This proposal extends the National Program beyond the greenhouse gas and corporate average fuel economy standards set for model years 2012-2016. On May 21, 2010, President Obama issued a Presidential Memorandum requesting that NHTSA and EPA develop through notice and comment rulemaking a coordinated National Program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions of light-duty vehicles for model years 2017- 2025. This proposal, consistent with the President's request, responds to the country's critical need to address global climate change and to reduce oil consumption. NHTSA is proposing Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended by the Energy Independence and Security Act, and EPA is proposing greenhouse gas emissions standards under the Clean Air Act. These standards apply to passenger cars, light-duty trucks, and medium- duty passenger vehicles, and represent a continued harmonized and consistent National Program. Under the National Program for model years 2017-2025, automobile manufacturers would be able to continue building a single light-duty national fleet that satisfies all requirements under both programs while ensuring that consumers still have a full range of vehicle choices. EPA is also proposing a minor change to the regulations applicable to MY 2012-2016, with respect to air conditioner performance and measurement of nitrous oxides.2017-and-later-model-year-light-duty-vehicle-greenhouse-gas-emissions-and-corporate-average-fuelFR-Doc-2011-30358
Alternative Fuel Transportation Program; Alternative Fueled Vehicle Credit Program (Subpart F) Modification and Other AmendmentsProposed Rule2011-2676110/31/2011Energy DepartmentDOE today proposes a rule pursuant to the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), that would revise the allocation of marketable credits under DOE's Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (AFTP or Program), by inclu … DOE today proposes a rule pursuant to the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), that would revise the allocation of marketable credits under DOE's Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (AFTP or Program), by including EISA-specified electric drive vehicles and investments in qualified alternative fuel infrastructure, nonroad equipment, and relevant emerging technologies. DOE also is proposing modifications to the use of Program credits, revisions to the exemption process, clarifications of the Alternative Compliance option, and several technical and other amendments intended to make the Program regulations clearer.alternative-fuel-transportation-program-alternative-fueled-vehicle-credit-program-subpart-fFR-Doc-2011-26761
Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and VehiclesRule2011-2750210/25/2011Transportation DepartmentThis document contains corrections to the final rule regulations (49 CFR parts 523 and 535), which were published in the Federal Register of Thursday, September 15, 2011 (76 FR 57106). The regulations established fuel efficiency standa … This document contains corrections to the final rule regulations (49 CFR parts 523 and 535), which were published in the Federal Register of Thursday, September 15, 2011 (76 FR 57106). The regulations established fuel efficiency standards for medium- and heavy-duty engines and vehicles, as prescribed under the Energy Independence and Security Act (49 U.S.C. 32902(k)(2)).greenhouse-gas-emissions-standards-and-fuel-efficiency-standards-for-medium--and-heavy-duty-enginesFR-Doc-2011-27502
Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and VehiclesRule2011-2497809/28/2011Transportation DepartmentThis document contains corrections to the final rule regulations (49 CFR 535.6), which were published in the Federal Register of Thursday, September 15, 2011 (76 FR 57106). The regulations established fuel efficiency standards for med … This document contains corrections to the final rule regulations (49 CFR 535.6), which were published in the Federal Register of Thursday, September 15, 2011 (76 FR 57106). The regulations established fuel efficiency standards for medium- and heavy-duty engines and vehicles, as prescribed under the Energy Independence and Security Act (49 U.S.C. 32902(k)(2)).greenhouse-gas-emissions-standards-and-fuel-efficiency-standards-for-medium--and-heavy-duty-enginesFR-Doc-2011-24978
Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and VehiclesRule2011-2074009/15/2011Environmental Protection AgencyEPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, are each finalizing rules to establish a comprehensive Heavy-Duty National Program that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption for on-road heavy-duty vehi … EPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, are each finalizing rules to establish a comprehensive Heavy-Duty National Program that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption for on-road heavy-duty vehicles, responding to the President's directive on May 21, 2010, to take coordinated steps to produce a new generation of clean vehicles. NHTSA's final fuel consumption standards and EPA's final carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions standards are tailored to each of three regulatory categories of heavy-duty vehicles: Combination Tractors; Heavy-duty Pickup Trucks and Vans; and Vocational Vehicles. The rules include separate standards for the engines that power combination tractors and vocational vehicles. Certain rules are exclusive to the EPA program. These include EPA's final hydrofluorocarbon standards to control leakage from air conditioning systems in combination tractors, and pickup trucks and vans. These also include EPA's final nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) emissions standards that apply to all heavy- duty engines, pickup trucks and vans. EPA's final greenhouse gas emission standards under the Clean Air Act will begin with model year 2014. NHTSA's final fuel consumption standards under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 will be voluntary in model years 2014 and 2015, becoming mandatory with model year 2016 for most regulatory categories. Commercial trailers are not regulated in this phase of the Heavy-Duty National Program. The agencies estimate that the combined standards will reduce CO2 emissions by approximately 270 million metric tons and save 530 million barrels of oil over the life of vehicles sold during the 2014 through 2018 model years, providing over $7 billion in net societal benefits, and $49 billion in net societal benefits when private fuel savings are considered. EPA is also finalizing provisions allowing light-duty vehicle manufacturers to use CO2 credits to meet the light-duty vehicle N2O and CH4 standards, technical amendments to the fuel economy provisions for light-duty vehicles, and a technical amendment to the criteria pollutant emissions requirements for certain switch locomotives.greenhouse-gas-emissions-standards-and-fuel-efficiency-standards-for-medium--and-heavy-duty-enginesFR-Doc-2011-20740
Revisions and Additions to Motor Vehicle Fuel Economy LabelRule2011-1429107/06/2011Environmental Protection AgencyThe Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) are issuing a joint final rule establishing new requirements for the fuel economy and environment label that will be posted on th … The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) are issuing a joint final rule establishing new requirements for the fuel economy and environment label that will be posted on the window sticker of all new automobiles sold in the U.S. The labeling requirements apply for model year 2013 and later vehicles with a voluntary manufacturer option for model year 2012. The labeling requirements apply to passenger cars, light-duty trucks, and medium duty passenger vehicles such as larger sport-utility vehicles and vans. The redesigned label provides expanded information to American consumers about new vehicle fuel economy and fuel consumption, greenhouse gas and smog-forming emissions, and projected fuel costs and savings, and also includes a smartphone interactive code that permits direct access to additional Web resources. Specific label designs are provided for gasoline, diesel, ethanol flexible fuel, compressed natural gas, electric, plug-in hybrid electric, and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. This rulemaking is in response to provisions in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 that imposed several new labeling requirements and new advanced-technology vehicles entering the market. NHTSA and EPA believe that these changes will help consumers to make more informed vehicle purchase decisions, particularly as the future automotive marketplace provides more diverse vehicle technologies from which consumers may choose. These new label requirements do not affect the methodologies that EPA uses to generate consumer fuel economy estimates, or the automaker compliance values for NHTSA's corporate average fuel economy and EPA's greenhouse gas emissions standards. This action also finalizes a number of technical corrections to EPA's light-duty greenhouse gas emission standards program.revisions-and-additions-to-motor-vehicle-fuel-economy-labelFR-Doc-2011-14291
Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and VehiclesProposed Rule2010-2812011/30/2010Environmental Protection AgencyEPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, are each proposing rules to establish a comprehensive Heavy-Duty National Program that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase fuel efficiency for on-road h … EPA and NHTSA, on behalf of the Department of Transportation, are each proposing rules to establish a comprehensive Heavy-Duty National Program that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase fuel efficiency for on-road heavy-duty vehicles, responding to the President's directive on May 21, 2010, to take coordinated steps to produce a new generation of clean vehicles. NHTSA's proposed fuel consumption standards and EPA's proposed carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions standards would be tailored to each of three regulatory categories of heavy-duty vehicles: Combination Tractors; Heavy-Duty Pickup Trucks and Vans; and Vocational Vehicles, as well as gasoline and diesel heavy-duty engines. EPA's proposed hydrofluorocarbon emissions standards would apply to air conditioning systems in tractors, pickup trucks, and vans, and EPA's proposed nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) emissions standards would apply to all heavy-duty engines, pickup trucks, and vans. EPA is also requesting comment on possible alternative CO2-equivalent approaches for model year 2012-14 light-duty vehicles. EPA's proposed greenhouse gas emission standards under the Clean Air Act would begin with model year 2014. NHTSA's proposed fuel consumption standards under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 would be voluntary in model years 2014 and 2015, becoming mandatory with model year 2016 for most regulatory categories. Commercial trailers would not be regulated in this phase of the Heavy- Duty National Program, although there is a discussion of the possibility of future action for trailers.greenhouse-gas-emissions-standards-and-fuel-efficiency-standards-for-medium--and-heavy-duty-enginesFR-Doc-2010-28120
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