Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

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TitleActionFR DocPublishedAgency NameExcerptsAbstractHTMLPDF
TitleActionFR DocPublishedAgency NameExcerptsAbstractHTMLPDF
Restrictions on Qualified Financial Contracts of Certain FDIC-Supervised Institutions; Revisions to the Definition of Qualifying Master Netting Agreement and Related DefinitionsRule2017-2195110/30/2017Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThe FDIC is adding regulations to improve the resolvability of systemically important U.S. banking organizations and systemically important foreign banking organizations and enhance the resilience and the safety and soundness of ce … The FDIC is adding regulations to improve the resolvability of systemically important U.S. banking organizations and systemically important foreign banking organizations and enhance the resilience and the safety and soundness of certain State savings associations and State-chartered banks that are not members of the Federal Reserve System (``State non-member banks'' or ``SNMBs'') for which the FDIC is the primary Federal regulator (together, ``FSIs'' or ``FDIC-supervised institutions''). This final rule requires that FSIs and their subsidiaries (``covered FSIs'') ensure that covered qualified financial contracts (QFCs) to which they are a party provide that any default rights and restrictions on the transfer of the QFCs are limited to the same extent as they would be under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act) and the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (FDI Act). In addition, covered FSIs are generally prohibited from being party to QFCs that would allow a QFC counterparty to exercise default rights against the covered FSI based on the entry into a resolution proceeding under the FDI Act, or any other resolution proceeding of an affiliate of the covered FSI. The final rule also amends the definition of ``qualifying master netting agreement'' in the FDIC's capital and liquidity rules, and certain related terms in the FDIC's capital rules. These amendments are intended to ensure that the regulatory capital and liquidity treatment of QFCs to which a covered FSI is party would not be affected by the restrictions on such QFCs.restrictions-on-qualified-financial-contracts-of-certain-fdic-supervised-institutions-revisions-toFR-Doc-2017-21951
Revision of the FDIC's Freedom of Information Act RegulationsRule2016-2796111/22/2016Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThis rule amends the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation's (FDIC) regulations under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to incorporate certain changes made to the FOIA by the FOIA Improvement Act of 2016 (FOIA Improvement Act). In … This rule amends the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation's (FDIC) regulations under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to incorporate certain changes made to the FOIA by the FOIA Improvement Act of 2016 (FOIA Improvement Act). In addition, this rule amends certain provisions to reflect changes brought about by prior amendments to the FOIA that had been incorporated into agency practice and corrects inaccurate contact information and adjusts numbering and lettering of current provisions because of additions to the regulations.revision-of-the-fdics-freedom-of-information-act-regulationsFR-Doc-2016-27961
Restrictions on Qualified Financial Contracts of Certain FDIC-Supervised Institutions; Revisions to the Definition of Qualifying Master Netting Agreement and Related DefinitionsProposed Rule2016-2560510/26/2016Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThe FDIC is proposing to add a new part to its rules to improve the resolvability of systemically important U.S. banking organizations and systemically important foreign banking organizations and enhance the resilience and the safe … The FDIC is proposing to add a new part to its rules to improve the resolvability of systemically important U.S. banking organizations and systemically important foreign banking organizations and enhance the resilience and the safety and soundness of certain state savings associations and state-chartered banks that are not members of the Federal Reserve System (``state non-member banks'' or ``SNMBs'') for which the FDIC is the primary federal regulator (together, ``FSIs'' or ``FDIC-supervised institutions''). Under this proposed rule, covered FSIs would be required to ensure that covered qualified financial contracts (QFCs) to which they are a party provide that any default rights and restrictions on the transfer of the QFCs are limited to the same extent as they would be under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act) and the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (FDI Act). In addition, covered FSIs would generally be prohibited from being party to QFCs that would allow a QFC counterparty to exercise default rights against the covered FSI based on the entry into a resolution proceeding under the FDI Act, or any other resolution proceeding of an affiliate of the covered FSI. The proposal would also amend the definition of ``qualifying master netting agreement'' in the FDIC's capital and liquidity rules, and certain related terms in the FDIC's capital rules. These proposed amendments are intended to ensure that the regulatory capital and liquidity treatment of QFCs to which a covered FSI is party would not be affected by the proposed restrictions on such QFCs. The requirements of this proposed rule are substantively identical to those contained in the notice of proposed rulemaking issued by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (FRB) on May 3, 2016 (FRB NPRM) regarding ``covered entities'', and the notice of proposed rulemaking issued by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) on August 19, 2016 (OCC NPRM), regarding ``covered banks''.restrictions-on-qualified-financial-contracts-of-certain-fdic-supervised-institutions-revisions-toFR-Doc-2016-25605
Regulatory Capital Rules, Liquidity Coverage Ratio: Revisions to the Definition of Qualifying Master Netting Agreement and Related DefinitionsRule2016-2502110/17/2016Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThe FDIC is adopting a final rule that amends the definition of ``qualifying master netting agreement'' under the regulatory capital rules and the liquidity coverage ratio rule. In this final rule, the FDIC also is amending the definit … The FDIC is adopting a final rule that amends the definition of ``qualifying master netting agreement'' under the regulatory capital rules and the liquidity coverage ratio rule. In this final rule, the FDIC also is amending the definitions of ``collateral agreement,'' ``eligible margin loan,'' and ``repo-style transaction'' under the regulatory capital rules. These amendments are designed to ensure that the regulatory capital and liquidity treatment of certain financial contracts generally would not be affected by implementation of special resolution regimes in non-U.S. jurisdictions that are substantially similar to the U.S. resolution framework or by changes to the International Swaps and Derivative Association (ISDA) Master Agreement that provide for contractual submission to such regimes. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Federal Reserve) issued in December 2014, a joint interim final rule that is substantially identical to this final rule.regulatory-capital-rules-liquidity-coverage-ratio-revisions-to-the-definition-of-qualifying-masterFR-Doc-2016-25021
Net Stable Funding Ratio: Liquidity Risk Measurement Standards and Disclosure RequirementsProposed Rule2016-1150506/01/2016Treasury DepartmentThe Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Board), and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) are inviting comment on a proposed rule that would impleme … The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Board), and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) are inviting comment on a proposed rule that would implement a stable funding requirement, the net stable funding ratio (NSFR), for large and internationally active banking organizations. The proposed NSFR requirement is designed to reduce the likelihood that disruptions to a banking organization's regular sources of funding will compromise its liquidity position, as well as to promote improvements in the measurement and management of liquidity risk. The proposed rule would also amend certain definitions in the liquidity coverage ratio rule that are also applicable to the NSFR. The proposed NSFR requirement would apply beginning on January 1, 2018, to bank holding companies, certain savings and loan holding companies, and depository institutions that, in each case, have $250 billion or more in total consolidated assets or $10 billion or more in total on-balance sheet foreign exposure, and to their consolidated subsidiaries that are depository institutions with $10 billion or more in total consolidated assets. In addition, the Board is proposing a modified NSFR requirement for bank holding companies and certain savings and loan holding companies that, in each case, have $50 billion or more, but less than $250 billion, in total consolidated assets and less than $10 billion in total on-balance sheet foreign exposure. Neither the proposed NSFR requirement nor the proposed modified NSFR requirement would apply to banking organizations with consolidated assets of less than $50 billion and total on-balance sheet foreign exposure of less than $10 billion. A bank holding company or savings and loan holding company subject to the proposed NSFR requirement or modified NSFR requirement would be required to publicly disclose the company's NSFR and the components of its NSFR each calendar quarter.net-stable-funding-ratio-liquidity-risk-measurement-standards-and-disclosure-requirementsFR-Doc-2016-11505
Regulatory Capital Rules, Liquidity Coverage Ratio: Proposed Revisions to the Definition of Qualifying Master Netting Agreement and Related DefinitionsProposed Rule2015-0132401/30/2015Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThe FDIC invites comment on a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPR or proposed rule) that would amend the definition of ``qualifying master netting agreement'' under the regulatory capital rules, and the liquidity coverage ratio rul … The FDIC invites comment on a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPR or proposed rule) that would amend the definition of ``qualifying master netting agreement'' under the regulatory capital rules, and the liquidity coverage ratio rule. The FDIC also is proposing to amend the definitions of ``collateral agreement,'' ``eligible margin loan,'' and ``repo-style transaction'' under the regulatory capital rules. The amendments are designed to ensure that the regulatory capital and liquidity treatment of certain financial contracts generally would not be affected by implementation of special resolution regimes in foreign jurisdictions if such regimes are substantially similar to Title II of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and the Federal Deposit Insurance Act in the United States, or by the International Swaps and Derivative Association Resolution Stay Protocol that provide for contractual submission to such regimes. In December 2014, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Board) adopted a joint interim final rule that is related to this proposed rule.regulatory-capital-rules-liquidity-coverage-ratio-proposed-revisions-to-the-definition-of-qualifyingFR-Doc-2015-01324
Annual Stress TestRule2014-2761011/21/2014Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThe Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the Corporation or FDIC) is issuing a final rule that implements proposed revisions to regulations regarding the annual stress testing requirements for state nonmember banks and state saving … The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the Corporation or FDIC) is issuing a final rule that implements proposed revisions to regulations regarding the annual stress testing requirements for state nonmember banks and state savings associations with total consolidated assets of more than $10 billion (covered banks). The regulations, which implement section 165(i)(2) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the Dodd-Frank Act), require covered banks to conduct annual stress tests, report the results of such stress tests to the Corporation and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the Board), and publicly disclose a summary of the results of the required stress tests. The final rule revises the 2016 stress test cycle and for years thereafter to begin on January 1 of the calendar year rather than October 1, as is provided for by the current rule. Additionally, the final rule modifies the ``as of'' dates for financial data (that covered banks will use to perform their stress tests) as well as the reporting dates and public disclosure dates of the annual stress tests for both $10 billion to $50 billion covered banks and over $50 billion covered banks.annual-stress-testFR-Doc-2014-27610
Liquidity Coverage Ratio: Liquidity Risk Measurement StandardsRule2014-2252010/10/2014Treasury DepartmentThe Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Board), and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) are adopting a final rule that implements a quantitative li … The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Board), and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) are adopting a final rule that implements a quantitative liquidity requirement consistent with the liquidity coverage ratio standard established by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS). The requirement is designed to promote the short-term resilience of the liquidity risk profile of large and internationally active banking organizations, thereby improving the banking sector's ability to absorb shocks arising from financial and economic stress, and to further improve the measurement and management of liquidity risk. The final rule establishes a quantitative minimum liquidity coverage ratio that requires a company subject to the rule to maintain an amount of high-quality liquid assets (the numerator of the ratio) that is no less than 100 percent of its total net cash outflows over a prospective 30 calendar-day period (the denominator of the ratio). The final rule applies to large and internationally active banking organizations, generally, bank holding companies, certain savings and loan holding companies, and depository institutions with $250 billion or more in total assets or $10 billion or more in on- balance sheet foreign exposure and to their consolidated subsidiaries that are depository institutions with $10 billion or more in total consolidated assets. The final rule focuses on these financial institutions because of their complexity, funding profiles, and potential risk to the financial system. Therefore, the agencies do not intend to apply the final rule to community banks. In addition, the Board is separately adopting a modified minimum liquidity coverage ratio requirement for bank holding companies and savings and loan holding companies without significant insurance or commercial operations that, in each case, have $50 billion or more in total consolidated assets but that are not internationally active. The final rule is effective January 1, 2015, with transition periods for compliance with the requirements of the rule.liquidity-coverage-ratio-liquidity-risk-measurement-standardsFR-Doc-2014-22520
Liquidity Coverage Ratio: Liquidity Risk Measurement, Standards, and MonitoringProposed Rule2013-2708211/29/2013Treasury DepartmentThe Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Board), and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) are requesting comment on a proposed rule (proposed rule) tha … The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Board), and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) are requesting comment on a proposed rule (proposed rule) that would implement a quantitative liquidity requirement consistent with the liquidity coverage ratio standard established by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision. The requirement is designed to promote the short-term resilience of the liquidity risk profile of internationally active banking organizations, thereby improving the banking sector's ability to absorb shocks arising from financial and economic stress, as well as improvements in the measurement and management of liquidity risk. The proposed rule would apply to all internationally active banking organizations, generally, bank holding companies, certain savings and loan holding companies, and depository institutions with more than $250 billion in total assets or more than $10 billion in on-balance sheet foreign exposure, and to their consolidated subsidiaries that are depository institutions with $10 billion or more in total consolidated assets. The proposed rule would also apply to companies designated for supervision by the Board by the Financial Stability Oversight Council under section 113 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act that do not have significant insurance operations and to their consolidated subsidiaries that are depository institutions with $10 billion or more in total consolidated assets. The Board also is proposing on its own a modified liquidity coverage ratio standard that is based on a 21- calendar day stress scenario rather than a 30 calendar-day stress scenario for bank holding companies and savings and loan holding companies without significant insurance or commercial operations that, in each case, have $50 billion or more in total consolidated assets.liquidity-coverage-ratio-liquidity-risk-measurement-standards-and-monitoringFR-Doc-2013-27082
Annual Stress TestRule2012-2519410/15/2012Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThe Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the ``Corporation'' or ``FDIC'') is issuing a final rule that implements the requirements of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the ``Dodd-Frank Act'') regarding st … The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the ``Corporation'' or ``FDIC'') is issuing a final rule that implements the requirements of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the ``Dodd-Frank Act'') regarding stress tests (``final rule''). The Dodd- Frank Act requires the Corporation to issue regulations that require FDIC-insured state nonmember banks and FDIC-insured state-chartered savings associations with total consolidated assets of more than $10 billion to conduct annual stress tests, report the results of such stress tests to the Corporation and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (``Board''), and publish a summary of the results of the stress tests. The final rule requires large covered banks to conduct annual stress tests beginning on the effective date of this final rule. The Corporation, however, will delay implementation of the annual stress test requirements under the final rule for institutions with total consolidated assets of more than $10 billion but less than $50 billion until September 30, 2013. The final rule requirement for public disclosure of a summary of the stress testing results for these institutions will be implemented starting with the 2014 stress test, with the disclosure occurring during the period starting June 15 and ending June 30 of 2015.annual-stress-testFR-Doc-2012-25194
Annual Stress TestProposed Rule2012-113501/23/2012Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThe Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the ``Corporation'' or ``FDIC'') requests comment on this proposed rule that implements the requirements in Section 165(i) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the … The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the ``Corporation'' or ``FDIC'') requests comment on this proposed rule that implements the requirements in Section 165(i) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the ``Dodd-Frank Act'') regarding stress tests (``proposed rule''). This proposed rule would implement section 165(i)(2) by requiring state nonmember banks and state savings associations supervised by the Corporation with total consolidated assets of more than $10 billion to conduct annual stress tests in accordance with the proposed rule, report the results of such stress tests to the Corporation and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (``Board'') at such time and in such a form containing the information required by the Corporation, and publish a summary of the results of the required stress tests.annual-stress-testFR-Doc-2012-1135
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