Charter Flights

charter-flights
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
Transportation Department -- Aviation Safety Organization Changes2018-Mar-052018-03374The FAA Aircraft Certification Service (AIR) and Flight Standards Service (AFS) have reorganized to align with functional organization design concepts. The AIR reorganization included eliminating product directorates and restructuring and re-designating field offices. The AFS reorganization included eliminating geographic regions, realigning headquarters organizations, and restructuring field offices. Currently, various rules in the Code of Federal Regulations refer to specific AIR and AFS offices that are obsolete after the reorganizations. This rule replaces specific references with generic references not dependent on any particular office structure. This rule does not impose any new obligations and is only intended to eliminate any confusion about with whom regulated entities and other persons should interact when complying with these various rules in the future.
Transportation Department -- Revisions to Operational Requirements for the Use of Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS) and to Pilot Compartment View Requirements for Vision Systems2016-Dec-132016-28714Prior to this final rule, persons could only use an Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) in lieu of natural vision to descend below the decision altitude, decision height, or minimum descent altitude (DA/DH or MDA) down to 100 feet above the touchdown zone elevation (TDZE) using certain straight-in landing instrument approach procedures (IAPs). This final rule permits operators to use an EFVS in lieu of natural vision to continue descending from 100 feet above the TDZE to the runway and to land on certain straight-in IAPs under instrument flight rules (IFR). This final rule also revises and relocates the regulations that permit operators to use an EFVS in lieu of natural vision to descend to 100 feet above the TDZE using certain straight-in IAPs. Additionally, this final rule addresses provisions that permit operators who conduct EFVS operations under parts 121, 125, or 135 to use EFVS-equipped aircraft to dispatch, release, or takeoff under IFR, and revises the regulations for those operators to initiate and continue an approach, when the destination airport weather is below authorized visibility minimums for the runway of intended landing. This final rule establishes pilot training and recent flight experience requirements for operators who use EFVS in lieu of natural vision to descend below the DA/DH or MDA. EFVS-equipped aircraft conducting operations to touchdown and rollout are required to meet additional airworthiness requirements. This final rule also revises pilot compartment view certification requirements for vision systems using a transparent display surface located in the pilot's outside field of view. The final rule takes advantage of advanced vision capabilities, thereby achieving the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) goals of increasing access, efficiency, and throughput at many airports when low visibility is the limiting factor. Additionally, it enables EFVS operations in reduced visibilities on a greater number of approach procedure types while maintaining an equivalent level of safety.
Transportation Department -- Acceptance Criteria for Portable Oxygen Concentrators Used On Board Aircraft2016-May-242016-11918This final rule replaces the existing process by which the Federal Aviation Administration (Agency or FAA) approves portable oxygen concentrators (POC) for use on board aircraft in air carrier operations, commercial operations, and certain other operations using large aircraft. The FAA currently assesses each POC make and model on a case-by-case basis and if the FAA determines that a particular POC is safe for use on board an aircraft, the FAA conducts rulemaking to identify the specific POC model in an FAA regulation. This final rule replaces the current process and allows passengers to use a POC on board an aircraft if the POC satisfies certain acceptance criteria and bears a label indicating conformance with the acceptance criteria. The labeling requirement only affects POCs intended for use on board aircraft that were not previously approved for use on aircraft by the FAA. Additionally, this rulemaking will eliminate redundant operational requirements and paperwork requirements related to the physician's statement. As a result, this rulemaking will reduce burdens for POC manufacturers, passengers who use POCs while traveling, and affected aircraft operators. This final rule also makes conforming amendments to the Department of Transportation's (Department or DOT) rule implementing the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) to require carriers to accept all POC models that meet FAA acceptance criteria as detailed in this rule.
Transportation Department -- Disclosure of Seat Dimensions To Facilitate Use of Child Safety Seats on Airplanes During Passenger-Carrying Operations2015-Sep-302015-24720This final rule requires air carriers conducting domestic, flag, and supplemental operations to make available on their Web sites information to enable passengers to determine which child restraint system can be used on airplanes in these operations. Specifically, this final rule requires air carriers to make available on their Web sites the width of the narrowest and widest passenger seats in each class of service for each make, model and series of airplane used in passenger- carrying operations.
Transportation Department -- Safety Management Systems for Domestic, Flag, and Supplemental Operations Certificate Holders2015-Jan-082015-00143This final rule requires each air carrier operating under 14 CFR part 121 to develop and implement a safety management system (SMS) to improve the safety of its aviation-related activities. SMS is a comprehensive, process-oriented approach to managing safety throughout an organization. SMS includes an organization-wide safety policy; formal methods for identifying hazards, controlling, and continually assessing risk and safety performance; and promotion of a safety culture. SMS stresses not only compliance with technical standards but also increased emphasis on the overall safety performance of the organization.
Transportation Department -- Acceptance Criteria for Portable Oxygen Concentrators Used On Board Aircraft2014-Sep-192014-21964This rulemaking would replace Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 106 with acceptance criteria for portable oxygen concentrators to be used by passengers in air carrier operations, commercial operations and certain other operations using large aircraft. Currently, the agency assesses each portable oxygen concentrator on a case-by-case basis to determine whether it is safe for use on board aircraft. If the agency determines that a portable oxygen concentrator is safe for use on board aircraft, the specific model is identified in regulations. This rulemaking would replace the burdensome approval process with acceptance criteria and a requirement for manufacturers to demonstrate compliance by affixing a label on the exterior of the portable oxygen concentrator applied in a manner that ensures it will remain affixed for the life of the device. The proposed acceptance criteria and labeling requirement would only affect portable oxygen concentrators intended for use on board aircraft. Portable oxygen concentrators currently approved for use on board aircraft would not be affected by this proposal and will be listed in this rule as approved. This rulemaking would also eliminate redundant requirements and paperwork requirements that are not necessary for aviation safety thereby reducing burdens for portable oxygen concentrator manufacturers, passengers who use portable oxygen concentrators while traveling, and aircraft operators conducting air carrier operations, commercial operations or certain operations using large aircraft.
Transportation Department -- Disclosure of Seat Dimensions to Facilitate Use of Child Safety Seats on Airplanes During Passenger-Carrying Operations2014-Apr-012014-07172The FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 requires the Federal Aviation Administration to initiate rulemaking to require air carriers conducting domestic, flag, and supplemental operations to make available on their Web sites information to enable passengers to determine which child safety seats can be used on aircraft in these operations. To fulfill the requirements of the Act, the FAA proposes to require air carriers to make available on their Web sites the width of the widest passenger seat in each class of service for each make, model and series of airplane used in passenger-carrying operations. If finalized as proposed, this rule would provide greater information to caregivers to help them determine whether a particular child restraint system will fit in an airplane seat. This proposal does not affect existing regulations regarding the use of child restraint systems on board airplanes or a passenger under the age of 2 traveling onboard aircraft with or without the use of a child restraint system.
Transportation Department -- Combined Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs2013-Jul-152013-16852This rulemaking allows air carrier operators and commuter or on-demand operators that also conduct commercial air tour operations to combine the drug and alcohol testing required for each operation into one testing program. The current rule requires those operators to conduct separate testing programs for their commercial air tour operations. This results in an unnecessary duplication of effort. The intended effect of this rulemaking is to decrease operating costs by eliminating the requirement for duplicate programs while maintaining the level of safety intended by existing rules. This final rule also clarifies existing instructions within the rule, corrects a typographical error, and removes language describing a practice that has been discontinued.
Transportation Department -- Revisions to Operational Requirements for the Use of Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS) and to Pilot Compartment View Requirements for Vision Systems2013-Jun-112013-13454The FAA is proposing to permit operators to use an Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) in lieu of natural vision to continue descending from 100 feet above the touchdown zone elevation to the runway and land on certain straight-in instrument approach procedures under instrument flight rules (IFR). This proposal would also permit certain operators using EFVS-equipped aircraft to dispatch, release, or takeoff under IFR, and to initiate and continue an approach, when the destination airport weather is below authorized visibility minimums for the runway of intended landing. Under this proposal, pilot training, recent flight experience, and proficiency would be required for operators who use EFVS in lieu of natural vision to descend below decision altitude, decision height, or minimum descent altitude. EFVS- equipped aircraft conducting operations to touchdown and rollout would be required to meet additional airworthiness requirements. This proposal would also revise pilot compartment view certification requirements for vision systems using a transparent display surface located in the pilot's outside view. The proposal would take advantage of advanced vision capabilities thereby achieving the NextGen goals of increasing access, efficiency, and throughput at many airports when low visibility is the limiting factor. Additionally, it would enable EFVS operations in reduced visibilities on a greater number of approach procedure types while maintaining an equivalent level of safety.
Transportation Department -- Lavatory Oxygen Systems2013-Jan-282013-01695This action adds termination criteria and an expiration date to Special Federal Aviation Regulation 111, which temporarily authorizes variances from existing standards related to the provisioning of supplemental oxygen inside lavatories. This action is necessitated by the publication of Airworthiness Directive 2012-11-09, which mandates actions that restore supplemental oxygen to lavatories.
Transportation Department -- Minimum Altitudes for Use of Autopilots2012-Dec-042012-29274The FAA proposes to amend and harmonize minimum altitudes for use of autopilots for transport category airplanes. The proposed rule would enable the operational use of advanced autopilot and navigation systems by incorporating the capabilities of new and future autopilots, flight guidance systems, and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) guidance systems while protecting the continued use of legacy systems at current autopilot minimum use altitudes. The proposed rule would accomplish this through a performance-based approach, using the certified capabilities of autopilot systems as established by the Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) or as approved by the Administrator.
Transportation Department -- Combined Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs2012-Jul-022012-16009This rulemaking would allow air carrier operators and commuter or on-demand operators that also conduct commercial air tour operations to combine the drug and alcohol testing required for each operation into one testing program. The current rule requires those operators to conduct separate testing programs for their air tour operations. This results in an unnecessary duplication of effort. The intended effect of this rulemaking is to decrease operating costs by eliminating the requirement for duplicate programs while maintaining the level of safety intended by the current drug and alcohol testing regulations. This proposal would also clarify existing instructions within the rule, correct an inadvertent typographical error, clarify an existing requirement by rearranging its numerical order, and remove language that describes a practice that has been discontinued.
Transportation Department -- Removal of Six Month Line Check Requirement for Pilots Over Age 60; Technical Amendment2012-Jun-122012-14280The ``FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012,'' enacted on February 14, 2012, in Section 305 of the Act, removed the line check performance evaluation requirements for pilots over 60 years of age that applied to air carriers engaged in part 121 operations. This technical amendment conforms to the FAA's regulations as a result of the Act.
Transportation Department -- FAA-Approved Portable Oxygen Concentrators; Technical Amendment2012-Jan-272012-1830The FAA is amending regulations relating to operating rules for FAA approved portable oxygen concentrators (POC) onboard aircraft. This document updates the names of two manufacturers of approved POCs listed in the Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR).
Transportation Department -- Training and Qualification Requirements for Check Airmen and Flight Instructors; Technical Amendment2011-Jun-162011-14999The FAA is amending its regulations regarding separate requirements for check airmen who check only in flight simulators and flight instructors who instruct only in flight simulators. This document corrects minor technical errors in the codified text of those regulations.
Transportation Department -- Lavatory Oxygen Systems2011-Mar-082011-5325This action temporarily authorizes variances from existing standards related to the provisioning of supplemental oxygen inside lavatories. This action is necessitated by other mandatory actions that temporarily render such oxygen systems inoperative.
Transportation Department -- Removal of Expired Federal Aviation Administration Regulations and References2011-Feb-162011-3467The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is making minor technical changes to its regulations by removing expired Special Federal Aviation Regulations (SFARs) and cross-references, as well as other expired or obsolete regulations. None of these changes are substantive in nature since the regulations in question have expired and are not currently in effect. This technical amendment is necessary to update our regulations. The rule will not impose any additional burden or restriction on persons or organizations affected by these regulations.
Transportation Department -- Operations Specifications2011-Feb-102011-2834This amendment clarifies and standardizes the rules for applications by foreign air carriers and foreign persons for part 129 operations specifications and establishes new standards for amendment, suspension, and termination of those operations specifications. In addition, the FAA has moved definitions currently contained in a subpart to a separate part for clarity with no substantive changes to the definitions. The amendment also applies to foreign persons operating U.S.-registered aircraft in common carriage solely outside the United States. This action is necessary to update the process for issuing operations specifications and establishes a regulatory basis for current practices, such as amending, terminating, or suspending operations specifications.
Transportation Department -- Safety Management Systems for Part 121 Certificate Holders2010-Nov-052010-28050The FAA proposes to require each certificate holder operating under 14 CFR part 121 to develop and implement a safety management system (SMS) to improve the safety of their aviation related activities. A safety management system is a comprehensive, process- oriented approach to managing safety throughout an organization. An SMS includes an organization-wide safety policy; formal methods for identifying hazards, controlling, and continually assessing risk; and promotion of a safety culture. SMS stresses not only compliance with technical standards but increased emphasis on the overall safety performance of the organization.
Transportation Department -- Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification2010-Sep-172010-23283The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is making minor technical changes to a final rule published in the Federal Register on August 21, 2009. That final rule revised the training, qualification, certification, and operating requirements for pilots, flight instructors, ground instructors, and pilot schools. Through this technical amendment, we are clarifying the intent of Sec. 141.5(d) and reinserting language that was inadvertently removed pertaining to special courses of training under appendix K of part 141.
Transportation Department -- Operating Requirements: Domestic, Flag, Supplemental, Commuter, and On-Demand Operations: Corrections and Editorial Changes2010-May-122010-11266The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is making minor technical changes to a final rule published in the Federal Register on June 14, 1996. That final rule adopted corrections and editorial changes to several parts, which included an amendment to a section of part 119 that removed two subparagraphs. However, the FAA inadvertently did not also amend a separate section of part 119 to remove reference to the two obsolete subparagraphs. The FAA is issuing this technical amendment to correct that oversight.
Transportation Department -- Operations Specifications2010-May-072010-10890This proposed rule would clarify and standardize the rules for applications by foreign air carriers and foreign persons for operations specifications and establish new standards for amendment, suspension or termination of those operations specifications. The proposed rule would also apply to foreign persons operating U.S.-registered aircraft in common carriage solely outside the United States. This action is necessary to update the process for issuing operations specifications, and it will establish a regulatory basis for current practices, such as amending, terminating or suspending operations specifications.
Transportation Department -- Extension of the Compliance Date for Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations2010-Apr-052010-7660On March 7, 2008, the FAA published a final rule titled ``Revisions to Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations.'' The rule required certain upgrades of cockpit voice recorder and digital flight data recorder equipment on certain aircraft beginning April 7, 2010. That compliance date is being changed for certain requirements on certain aircraft.
Transportation Department -- Extended Operations (ETOPS) of Multi-Engine Airplanes; Technical Amendment2010-Mar-152010-5589The Federal Aviation Administration is making a minor amendment to a previously published final rule. That final rule applied to air carrier, commuter, and on-demand turbine powered multi-engine airplanes used in passenger-carrying, and some all-cargo, extended- range operations. This technical amendment corrects an incorrect citation reference.
Transportation Department -- Drug and Alcohol Testing Program; Correction2010-Jan-202010-908The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is correcting its drug and alcohol testing regulations published on May 14, 2009. The FAA inadvertently excluded necessary wording within the text of two separate definitions; added wording to the sections describing refusals to submit to drug or alcohol tests; directed readers to an incorrect subpart for a referenced definition; omitted a cross reference to a list of applicable regulations; and added wording when describing an operator. This rule corrects those inadvertent errors and includes other minor editorial corrections. These corrections will not impose any additional requirements on operators affected by these regulations.
Transportation Department -- Extension of the Compliance Date for Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations2010-Jan-072010-31On March 7, 2008, the FAA published a final rule titled ``Revisions to Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations.'' The rule required certain upgrades of digital flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder equipment on certain aircraft beginning April 7, 2010. The FAA is proposing to change that compliance date for some aircraft as outlined in this notice. This action follows petitions from several aircraft manufacturers and industry organizations indicating an inability to comply with the April 2010 requirement.
Transportation Department -- Revisions to Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations2009-Jul-099-16056The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is amending a final rule published in the Federal Register on March 7, 2008. That final rule amended cockpit voice recorder and digital flight data recorder regulations affecting certain air carriers, operators, and aircraft. In that final rule, the FAA failed to include conforming amendments to certain operating rules to ensure that certain new requirements apply to only newly manufactured aircraft.
Transportation Department -- Drug and Alcohol Testing Program2009-May-149-11289This action amends the FAA's drug and alcohol regulations to place them in a new part. The FAA is not making any substantive changes to the drug and alcohol regulations in this rulemaking.
Transportation Department -- OST Technical Corrections2008-Jun-128-12108DOT is amending a number of its regulations to reflect reorganization of some elements of DOT and the move of DOT's Headquarters site in Washington, DC. This action is taken on DOT's initiative.
Transportation Department -- Revisions to Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations2008-Mar-078-3949This final rule amends cockpit voice recorder (CVR) and digital flight data recorder (DFDR) regulations affecting certain air carriers, operators, and aircraft manufacturers. This final rule increases the duration of certain CVR recordings, increases the data recording rate for certain DFDR parameters, requires physical separation of the DFDR and CVR, improves the reliability of the power supplies to both the CVR and DFDR, and requires that certain datalink communications received on an aircraft be recorded if datalink communication equipment is installed. This final rule is based on recommendations issued by the National Transportation Safety Board following its investigations of several accidents and incidents, and includes other revisions the FAA has determined are necessary. These changes to CVR and DFDR systems are intended to improve the quality and quantity of information recorded, and increase the potential for retaining important information needed for accident and incident investigations.
Transportation Department -- Commuter Operations and General Certification and Operations Requirements; Qualifications for Director of Maintenance for Part 135 Operations2007-Sep-277-19056The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is making a minor technical change to a final rule, Commuter Operations and General Certification and Operations Requirements. This final rule established the requirements for certain management officials for certificate holders. In the final rule the FAA unintentionally included an incorrect experience requirement for the Director of Maintenance for commuter and on-demand operators. This amendment corrects that experience requirement.
Transportation Department -- Area Navigation (RNAV) and Miscellaneous Amendments2007-Jun-077-10609The FAA is amending its regulations to reflect technological advances that support area navigation (RNAV); include provisions on the use of suitable RNAV systems for navigation; amend certain terms for consistency with those of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO); remove reference to the middle marker in certain sections because a middle marker is no longer operationally required; clarify airspace terminology; and incorporate by reference obstacle departure procedures into Federal regulations. The changes will facilitate the use of new navigation reference sources, enable advancements in technology, and increase efficiency of the National Airspace System.
Transportation Department -- National Air Tour Safety Standards2007-Feb-1307-580This final rule sets safety and oversight rules for a broad variety of sightseeing and commercial air tour flights. The rule responds to National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) recommendations, Government Accountability Office (GAO) reports, and Department of Transportation Inspector General Reports that recommend better oversight of the sightseeing and commercial air tour industry. The intended effect of this final rule is to standardize requirements for air tour operators and consolidate air tour safety standards within part 136.
Transportation Department -- Flight Simulation Training Device Initial and Continuing Qualification and Use2006-Oct-3006-8677The FAA is amending the regulations to establish a new part to set forth qualification requirements for flight simulation training devices (FSTD). The new part consolidates and updates FSTD requirements that currently exist in different parts of the FAA's regulations and in advisory circulars. In addition, the FAA is requiring that sponsors of FSTDs have a Quality Management System. These changes are necessary to promote standardization and accountability for FSTD qualification, maintenance, and evaluation. The intended effect of the new part is to ensure that users of FSTDs receive training in devices that closely match the performance and handling characteristics of the aircraft being simulated.
Transportation Department -- Disqualification for Airman and Medical Certificate Holders Based on Alcohol Violations and Refusals To Submit to Drug or Alcohol Testing2006-Oct-246-17823This document makes a correction to the final regulation published in the Federal Register on June 21, 2006. (71 FR 35760) This rule amended the airman medical certification standards to disqualify an airman based on an alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater breath alcohol concentration (BAC) or a refusal to take a drug or alcohol test required by the Department of Transportation (DOT) or a DOT agency.
Transportation Department -- Use of Additional Portable Oxygen Concentrator Devices Onboard Aircraft2006-Sep-1206-7597This action amends Special Federal Aviation Regulation 106 (SFAR 106), Use of Certain Portable Oxygen Concentrator Devices Onboard Aircraft, to allow for the use of the AirSep Corporation's FreeStyle, SeQual Technologies' Eclipse, and Respironics Inc.'s EverGo portable oxygen concentrator (POC) devices onboard aircraft, provided certain conditions in the SFAR are met. This action is necessary to allow all POC devices deemed acceptable by the FAA to be available to the traveling public in need of oxygen therapy for use in air commerce. When this rule becomes effective, there will be a total of five different POC devices the FAA finds acceptable for use onboard aircraft during travel, and passengers will be able to carry these devices onboard the aircraft and use them with the approval of the aircraft operator.
Transportation Department -- Canadian Charter Air Taxi Operators2006-Aug-236-13664DOT is updating its rule concerning Canadian charter air taxis to make the rule consistent with the 1995 U.S.-Canada bilateral aviation agreement. When promulgated in 1981, the rule comported with the 1974 U.S.-Canada bilateral aviation agreement governing non- scheduled air services. However, the rule has not been updated to reflect the more liberal 1995 bilateral. Consequently, the rule, in its current form, contains certain restrictions on Canadian charter air taxis that are contrary to the 1995 bilateral. This final rule eliminates or amends those provisions. It also makes several other technical changes to the rule and adds a provision making it clear that Canadian charter air taxis are exempt from the statutory requirement of foreign air carriers to file family assistance plans.
Transportation Department -- Disqualification for Airman and Airman Medical Certificate Holders Based on Alcohol Violations or Refusals To Submit to Drug and Alcohol Testing2006-Jun-216-9814This final rule changes the airman medical certification standards to disqualify an airman based on an alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater breath alcohol concentration (BAC) or a refusal to take a drug or alcohol test required by the Department of Transportation (DOT) or a DOT agency. Further, this rulemaking standardizes the time period for reporting refusals and certain test results to the FAA, and requires employers to report pre-employment and return-to-duty test refusals. It also amends the airman medical certification requirements to allow suspension or revocation of airman medical certificates for pre-employment and return-to-duty test refusals. Finally, we have updated the regulations to recognize current breath alcohol testing technology. These amendments are necessary to ensure that persons who engage in substance abuse do not operate aircraft or perform contract air traffic control duties until it is determined that these individuals can safely exercise the privileges of their certificates.
Transportation Department -- Damage Tolerance Data for Repairs and Alterations2006-Apr-2106-3758This action would require holders of design approvals to make available to operators damage tolerance data for repairs and alterations to fatigue critical airplane structure. This proposal is needed to support operator compliance with the requirement to include damage tolerance inspections and procedures in their maintenance programs, and to enable operators to take into account the possible adverse effects of repairs and alterations on fatigue critical structure. The intended effect of this proposal is to ensure the continued airworthiness of fatigue critical airplane structure by requiring design approval holders to support operator compliance with specified damage tolerance requirements.
Transportation Department -- Antidrug and Alcohol Misuse Prevention Programs for Personnel Engaged in Specified Aviation Activities2006-Apr-0506-3277The FAA is delaying the compliance date for the final rule clarifying that contractors, including subcontractors at any tier, must be subject to drug and alcohol testing. This action is necessary because it has come to our attention that some original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and other entities may be confused regarding whether they are performing maintenance or preventive maintenance duties subject to drug and alcohol testing, or manufacturing duties not subject to testing. The effective date of April 10, 2006, will remain the same, but this action extends the compliance date until October 10, 2006, which gives OEMs and others sufficient time to determine what work is subject to drug and alcohol testing.
Transportation Department -- Charter Rules for Foreign Direct Air Carriers2006-Feb-0306-972The Department is amending its charter regulations by adding definitions of sixth- and seventh-freedom charters to the definitions section of 14 CFR Part 212, and by requiring foreign air carrier applicants for charter authority to provide updated reciprocity statements and operational data relative to its homeland-U.S. services.
Transportation Department -- Antidrug and Alcohol Misuse Prevention Programs for Personnel Engaged in Specified Aviation Activities2006-Jan-1006-205This final rule amends the FAA regulations governing drug and alcohol testing to clarify that each person who performs a safety- sensitive function for a regulated employer by contract, including by subcontract at any tier, is subject to testing. These amendments are necessary because in the 1990s, the FAA issued conflicting guidance about which contractors were subject to drug and alcohol testing. This action also rescinds all prior guidance on the subject of testing contractors.
Transportation Department -- Hazardous Materials Training Requirements; Correction2005-Dec-2005-24225This document corrects the final rule, ``Hazardous Materials Training Requirements'' published in the Federal Register of October 7, 2005.
Transportation Department -- Supplemental Oxygen2005-Nov-1005-22456In this direct final rule, the FAA is amending its regulation on the use of pilot supplemental oxygen. The amendment changes the flight level at which the remaining pilot at the controls of the airplane must put on and use his oxygen mask if the other pilot at any time leaves his control station of the airplane. This amendment revises that altitude to ``above flight level 350'' from ``above flight level 250.'' It will also eliminate the needless use of oxygen that is not otherwise required to provide for safety in air carrier operations. This will reduce needless expenditures to replace oxygen equipment that is subject to excessive wear and tear.
Transportation Department -- Digital Flight Data Recorder Requirements2005-Jul-1805-14036The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is making minor technical changes to a final rule published in the Federal Register on July 18, 2003 (68 FR 42932). That final rule amended appendices in 14 CFR parts 121, 125, and 135. In that final rule the FAA inadvertently did not make conforming amendments to two parts of Appendix M of part 121.
Transportation Department -- Use of Certain Portable Oxygen Concentrator Devices Onboard Aircraft2005-Jul-1205-13664This Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) will permit passengers to use certain portable oxygen concentrator (POC) devices on aircraft, provided certain conditions in this SFAR are satisfied. The SFAR includes a POC preparation requirement for carry-on baggage transport, and a battery-packaging standard necessary for the safe carriage of extra POC batteries in carry-on baggage. This rulemaking action is necessary to address the travelling needs of people on oxygen therapy.
Transportation Department -- Elimination of Commuter Air Carrier Registrations2005-May-1605-9655This action amends the regulations governing air taxi operators and commuter air carriers to eliminate the requirement that commuter air carriers file initial and amended registration forms. The information provided on such forms is duplicative of information that commuter air carriers are separately required to file under other regulations. Accordingly, this amendment simplifies the process of applying for and maintaining commuter air carrier authority. This action also makes conforming amendments to other rules affected by the amendment, as well as to make other minor administrative, editorial, clarifying, and organizational changes to rules applicable to air taxi operators and commuter air carriers.
Transportation Department -- Emergency Medical Equipment2005-Mar-2405-5764We are amending the regulations for emergency medical equipment to allow approved power sources that do not have TSO markings to be used in automated external defibrillators carried on board aircraft. We have found that in at least one instance, power sources manufactured before the manufacturer received TSO marking approval are identical to those manufactured with a TSO marking. Allowing already- purchased power sources to be used through their effective life will save operators money and will not result in decreased safety when the agency has made a finding of equivalency.
Transportation Department -- Revisions to Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations2005-Feb-2805-3726The FAA proposes to amend the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) and digital flight data recorder (DFDR) regulations for certain air carriers, operators, and aircraft manufacturers. This proposed rule would increase the duration of CVR and flight data recorder (FDR) recordings; increase the data recording rate of certain DFDR parameters; require physical separation of the DFDR and CVR; improve the reliability of the power supply to both the CVR and DFDR; and if data-link communication equipment is installed, require that all data- link communications received on an aircraft be recorded. This proposal is based on recommendations issued by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) following the investigations of several accidents and incidents, and includes other revisions that the FAA has determined are necessary. The proposed improvements to the CVR and DFDR systems are intended to improve the quality and quantity of information recorded and increase the potential for retaining important information needed during accident and incident investigations.
Transportation Department -- Reports by Carriers on Incidents Involving Animals During Air Transport2005-Feb-1405-2755The Department of Transportation (Department or DOT) is making a technical change to the August 11, 2003, final rule implementing section 710 of the Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment and Reform Act for the 21st Century (AIR-21) to require the reporting airlines to submit the required information on the loss, injury, or death of an animal during air transport to DOT's Aviation Consumer Protection Division rather than the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and, accordingly, is making the rule part of DOT's economic regulations.
Transportation Department -- Charter Rules for Foreign Direct Air Carriers2005-Jan-2105-1107The Department seeks comment on a proposal to revise its rules on charter operations. This proposal arises from a petition filed by the National Air Carrier Association (NACA). NACA seeks to make changes to the definitions and standards the Department uses to determine whether to grant or deny foreign air carrier requests to conduct certain types of international charter flights. The Department grants NACA's petition, and proposes to make some, but not all of the changes sought by NACA. The Department proposes to make revisions to definitions relating to charter types, and to modify the Department's current charter application form so as to require updated reciprocity information as well as numbers of U.S.-homeland services vs. U.S.-non-homeland services. The Department does not anticipate adopting NACA's requests to impose a reciprocity standard that ensures substantially equivalent opportunities for U.S. carriers in the homeland of the applicant, or to accord U.S. carriers a right of ``first refusal'' over foreign carrier requests to conduct certain U.S.-originating charter operations. Specifically, the Department proposes to clarify the definition of ``fifth freedom charter'' by adding definitions of ``sixth- and seventh-freedom charters.'' The Department also proposes modifications to OST Form 4540 (Foreign Air Carrier Application for Statement of Authorization). Specifically, the Department proposes to require an updated reciprocity statement by foreign carriers for a statement of authorization to allow us to ensure that our reciprocity standards have been satisfied and are properly supported. The Department also proposes to require that foreign carrier applicants for a statement of authorization include historical data relative to the applicant's U.S.- home country operations to allow the Department to readily evaluate levels of third- and fourth-freedom versus fifth-, sixth-, and seventh- freedom operations. This data will allow the Department to satisfy any concerns we might have as to the applicant's reliance on fifth-, sixth- and seventh-freedom operations. These proposed modifications will ensure that the Department has the most current information on the state of reciprocity for each foreign carrier applicant for fifth-, sixth-, or seventh-freedom charter authority.
Transportation Department -- Disqualification for Airman and Medical Certificate Holders Based on Alcohol Violations and Refusals to Submit to Drug or Alcohol Testing2004-Dec-1404-27216The FAA proposes to amend the airman medical certification standards to disqualify an airman based on an alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater breath alcohol concentration (BAC) or a refusal to take a drug or alcohol test required by the Department of Transportation (DOT) or a DOT agency. Further, the FAA proposes to standardize the time period for reporting refusals and certain test results to the FAA, and to require employers to report pre-employment and return-to-duty test refusals. We also propose to amend the airman certification requirements to allow suspension or revocation of airman certificates for pre-employment and return-to-duty test refusals. Finally, we propose to amend the regulations to recognize current breath alcohol testing technology. These amendments are necessary to ensure that persons who engage in substance abuse do not operate aircraft or perform contract air traffic control tower operations until it is determined that these individuals can operate safely.
Transportation Department -- Elimination of Commuter Air Carrier Registrations2004-Oct-2804-23859The Department proposes to amend the regulations governing air taxi operators and commuter air carriers to eliminate the requirement that commuter air carriers file initial and amended registration forms. The information provided on such forms is duplicative of information that commuter air carriers are separately required to file under other regulations. Accordingly, the proposed amendment will simplify the process of applying for and maintaining commuter air carrier authority. The Department also proposes to make conforming amendments to other rules affected by the proposed amendment, as well as to make other minor administrative, editorial, clarifying, and organizational changes to rules applicable to air taxi operators and commuter air carriers.
Transportation Department -- Use of Certain Portable Oxygen Concentrator Devices Onboard Aircraft2004-Jul-1404-15969This action proposes to address the traveling needs of persons on oxygen therapy by permitting the use of certain portable oxygen concentrator devices on aircraft, providing certain conditions are satisfied.
Transportation Department -- Antidrug and Alcohol Misuse Prevention Programs for Personnel Engaged in Specified Aviation Activities2004-May-1704-10815In Notice 02-04, published on February 28, 2002, the FAA proposed to make it clear that each person who performs a safety- sensitive function directly or by contract (including by subcontract at any tier) for an employer is subject to drug and alcohol testing. The comment period closed on July 29, 2002. Several commenters stated that the change was more than clarifying and would have an economic impact. The FAA has prepared an initial regulatory evaluation on this issue. The FAA is reopening the issue for public comment before making a final determination.
Transportation Department -- Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs: Drug and Alcohol Management Information System Reporting; Correction2004-Mar-1804-6097This document makes corrections to the final regulations (Appendix J to part 121) published in the Federal Register on December 31, 2003 (68 FR 75455), which revised reporting requirements and guidance for drug and alcohol testing for each Department of Transportation (DOT) agency.
Transportation Department -- Certification of Airports2004-Feb-1004-2255This rule revises the airport certification regulation and establishes certification requirements for airports serving scheduled air carrier operations in aircraft designed for more than 9 passenger seats but less than 31 passenger seats. In addition, this rule amends a section of an air carrier operation regulation to conform with changes to airport certification requirements. This rule is necessary to ensure safety in air transportation at all certificated airports.
Transportation Department -- Antidrug and Alcohol Misuse Prevention Programs for Personnel Engaged in Specified Aviation Activities2004-Jan-1204-482As a result of a number of years of experience inspecting the aviation industry's Antidrug and Alcohol Misuse Prevention Programs, the FAA is clarifying regulatory language, increasing consistency between the antidrug and alcohol misuse prevention program regulations where possible, and eliminating regulatory provisions that are no longer appropriate. The major changes the FAA is making include the requirements for submission of antidrug plans and alcohol misuse prevention certification statements by employers and contractors; and the timing of pre-employment testing. The effect of these changes is to improve safety and lessen administrative burdens on the regulated public.
Transportation Department -- Enhanced Flight Vision Systems2004-Jan-0904-427The FAA is revising its regulations for landing under instrument flight rules to allow aircraft to operate below certain specified altitudes during instrument approach procedures, even when the airport environment is not visible using natural vision, if the pilot uses certain FAA-certified enhanced flight vision systems. This action informs the public and the aviation industry of the approval of the use of new technology for certain operational benefits.
Transportation Department -- Extended Operations (ETOPS) of Multi-engine Airplanes2003-Nov-1403-28407The FAA proposes to issue regulations governing the design, maintenance, and operation of airplanes and engines for flights that go beyond certain distances from an adequate airport. This proposal would extend some requirements that previously applied only to two-engine airplanes to airplanes with more than two-engines. The proposed rule implements existing policy, industry best practices and recommendations, and international standards to ensure that long-range flights will operate safely.
Transportation Department -- Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii2003-Oct-2303-26836This final rule continues the existing safety requirements in Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71 (SFAR 71) and eliminates the termination date for SFAR 71. The procedural, operational, and equipment safety requirements of SFAR 71 will continue to apply to Parts 91, 121, and 135 air tour operators in Hawaii. SFAR 71 does not apply to operations conducted under part 121 in airplanes with a passenger-seating configuration of more than 30 seats and a payload capacity of more than 7,500 pounds or to flights conducted in gliders or hot air balloons.
Transportation Department -- National Air Tour Safety Standards2003-Oct-2203-26104The FAA is proposing national safety standards to govern commercial air tours (i.e., sightseeing). These safety standards are proposed as a result of accidents and incidents involving air tour operators and subsequent National Transportation Safety Board recommendations. The proposed rule is intended to increase the safety of commercial air tours on a national basis by requiring certification of air tour operators and by establishing new safety requirements.
Transportation Department -- Regulation of Fractional Aircraft Ownership Programs and On-Demand Operations2003-Sep-1703-23021The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is updating and revising the regulations governing operations of aircraft in fractional ownership programs. The FAA has determined that the current regulations do not adequately define fractional ownership programs and do not clearly allocate responsibility and authority for safety and compliance with the regulations. This final rule defines fractional ownership programs and their various participants, allocates responsibility and authority for safety of flight operations for purposes of compliance with the regulations, and ensures that fractional ownership program aircraft operations will maintain a high level of safety. These regulations provide a level of safety for fractional ownership programs equivalent to certain regulations that apply to on-demand operators. The rule also revises some requirements that apply to on-demand operators that meet certain criteria. The revisions permit these operators to follow an alternate means of compliance for certain commercial operations.
Transportation Department -- Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii2003-Aug-0803-20277This action proposes to continue the existing safety requirements in Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71 (SFAR 71) and eliminate the termination date for SFAR 71. Currently, SFAR 71 is a final rule that will expire on October 26, 2003. Since 1994, the FAA has extended SFAR 71 for two 3-year periods. The procedural, operational, and equipment safety requirements of SFAR 71 would continue to apply to parts 91, 121, and 135 air tour operators in Hawaii. SFAR 71 does not apply to operations conducted under part 121 in airplanes with a passenger-seating configuration of more than 30 seats and a payload capacity of more than 7,500 pounds or to flights conducted in gliders or hot air balloons.
Transportation Department -- DOD Commercial Air Carrier Evaluators2003-Jul-1003-17459This final rule clarifies existing regulations as they apply to Department of Defense (DOD) commercial air carrier evaluators. These amendments are necessary to clarify DOD's congressionally mandated cockpit evaluation mission and authority for the aviation security community and for industry. DOD's Air Mobility Command (AMC) will create and issue a new credential to permit DOD commercial air carrier evaluators uninterrupted access to the cockpit for evaluations. These amendments explicitly clarify existing DOD legal authority and responsibilities.
Transportation Department -- Hazardous Materials Training Requirements2003-May-0803-11244The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is proposing to amend its hazardous materials (hazmat) training requirements for certain air carriers and commercial operators. In addition, the FAA is proposing that certain repair stations document for the FAA that persons handling hazmat for transportation have been trained as required by the Department of Transportation's Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMRs). The FAA is updating its regulations because hazmat transport and the aviation industry have changed significantly since the FAA promulgated its hazmat training regulations over 25 years ago. The proposed rule would set clear training standards and ensure uniform compliance with training requirements.
Transportation Department -- Flightcrew Compartment Access and Door Designs2003-Apr-0903-8735This action supersedes Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) 92-4, which was published on March 19, 2002, to allow operators to quickly modify the flightcrew compartment door to delay or deter unauthorized entry to the flightcrew compartment. This action temporarily authorizes variances from existing design standards for the doors and certain operational rules associated with the modifications. It allows for approval for return to service of modified airplanes without prior approved data if the modification constitutes a major alteration. This action prohibits the possession of flightdeck compartment door keys by other than the flightcrew during flight, unless the flightdeck door has an internal flightdeck locking device installed, operative, and in use. This action extends regulatory relief for all-cargo transport category airplanes and a limited number of passenger airplanes beyond April 9, 2003.
Transportation Department -- Collision Avoidance Systems2003-Apr-0103-7653The FAA is revising the applicability of certain collision avoidance system requirements for airplanes. The current rules are based on passenger seating configuration and therefore exclude all- cargo airplanes. This final rule will use airplane weight and performance characteristics as the basis for collision avoidance system requirements to capture cargo airplanes weighing more than 33,000 pounds (lbs.) maximum certificated takeoff weight (MCTOW). This final rule is intended to reduce the risk of a mid-air collision involving a cargo airplane, which will increase safety for cargo crewmembers, the public on the ground, and occupants of airplanes that already have collision avoidance systems.
Transportation Department -- Special Operating Rules for the Conduct of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) Area Navigation (RNAV) Operations Using Global Positioning Systems (GPS) in Alaska2003-Mar-2103-6749Under Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) No. 97, the FAA allows the use of Global Positioning System/Wide Area Augmentation Systems for the en route portion of flights on routes in Alaska outside the operational service volume of ground based navigation aids. The use of aircraft navigation equipment other than area navigation systems, that only permit navigation to or from ground-based navigation stations, often results in less than optimal routes or instrument procedures and an inefficient use of airspace. SFAR 97 optimizes routes and instrument procedures and provides for a more efficient use of airspace. Further, the FAA anticipates that it will result in an associated increase in flight safety.
Transportation Department -- Enhanced Flight Vision Systems2003-Feb-1003-3265The FAA is proposing to revise its regulations for takeoff and landing under instrument flight rules (IFR) to allow for the use of FAA-certified enhanced flight vision systems (EFVS) that would enable the pilot to meet enhanced flight visibility requirements. The action would allow the use of new technology. This NPRM also contains proposed EFVS-related changes to the FAA's previously published Area Navigation (RNAV) NPRM, which was published on December 17, 2002.
Transportation Department -- Special Operating Rules for the Conduct of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) Area Navigation (RNAV) Operations Using Global Positioning Systems (GPS) in Alaska2003-Jan-2403-1601Under this Special Federal Aviation Regulation, the FAA proposes to allow the use of Global Positioning System/Wide Area Augmentation Systems for the en route portion of flights on routes in Alaska outside the operational service volume of ground based navigation aids. The use of aircraft navigation equipment other than area navigation systems, that only permit navigation to or from ground- based navigation stations, often results in less than optimal routes or instrument procedures and an inefficient use of airspace. This SFAR would optimize routes and instrument procedures and provide for a more efficient use of airspace. Further, it would result in an associated increase in flight safety.
Transportation Department -- Area Navigation (RNAV) and Miscellaneous Amendments2002-Dec-1702-31150The FAA is proposing to amend its regulations to reflect technological advances that support area navigation (RNAV); make certain terms consistent with those of the International Civil Aviation Organization; remove the middle marker as a required component of instrument landing systems; and clarify airspace terminology. The proposed changes are intended to facilitate the transition from ground- based navigation to new reference sources, enable advancements in technology, and increase efficiency of the National Airspace System.
Transportation Department -- Corrosion Prevention and Control Program2002-Oct-0302-24932This document proposes to require that the maintenance or inspection programs for all airplanes operated under part 121 of Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations, all U.S.-registered multiengine airplanes operated in common carriage by foreign air carriers or foreign persons under 14 CFR part 129, and all multiengine airplanes used in scheduled operations under 14 CFR part 135 include FAA-approved corrosion prevention and control programs. Such programs are needed because existing maintenance and inspection programs may not provide comprehensive, systematic measures to prevent and control corrosion. These proposals form a part of the FAA's response to legislation emanating from the Aging Aircraft Safety Act of 1991. These actions are intended to control the detrimental effects of corrosion and the resulting airplane structural material loss.
Transportation Department -- Reports by Carriers on Incidents Involving Animals During Air Transport2002-Sep-2702-24127This action implements Section 710 the Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment and Reform Act for the 21st Century (AIR-21) by requiring air carriers that provide scheduled passenger air transportation to submit monthly to the Secretary of Transportation, through the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), a report on any incidents involving the loss, injury or death of an animal during air transport provided by the air carrier.
Transportation Department -- Civil Aviation Security Rules2002-May-1002-11658The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is making minor technical changes to a final rule published in the Federal Register on February 22, 2002, effective February 17, 2002. That final rule transferred certain FAA regulations to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and removed parts 107, 108, 109, 191, and Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) No. 91 from title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The final rule, however, did not make conforming amendments to several cross-references to parts 107 and 108 appearing elsewhere in the FAA's regulations. This technical amendment conforms the cross-references to parts 107 and 108. These changes are not substantive in nature and will not impose any additional burden or restriction on persons or organizations affected by these regulations.
Transportation Department -- Flightcrew Compartment Access and Door Designs2002-Mar-1902-6366This action supersedes Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) 92-3, which was published on January 15, 2002, to allow operators to quickly modify the flightcrew compartment door to delay or deter unauthorized entry to the flightcrew compartment. This action temporarily authorizes variances from existing design standards for the doors and certain operational rules associated with the modifications. It allows for approval for return to service of modified airplanes without prior approved data if the modification constitutes a major alteration. This action also mandates these modifications on airplanes in certain passenger and cargo carrying operations. This action prohibits the possession of flightdeck compartment door keys by other than the flightcrew during flight, unless the flightdeck door has an internal flightdeck locking device installed, operative, and in use. This action is being taken in the wake of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks against four U.S. commercial airplanes.
Transportation Department -- Removal of Expired Special Federal Aviation Regulations2002-Mar-0102-4846The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is making minor technical changes to its regulations by removing Special Federal Aviation Regulations (SFARs) that have expired, as well as references to them, from the Code of Federal Regulations. None of these changes are substantive in nature since the regulations in question have expired and are not currently in effect. This technical amendment is necessary to update our regulations. The rule will not impose any additional burden or restriction on persons or organizations affected by these regulations.
Transportation Department -- Antidrug and Alcohol Misuse Prevention Programs for Personnel Engaged in Specified Aviation Activities2002-Feb-2802-3847After a number of years of experience inspecting the aviation industry's Antidrug and Alcohol Misuse Prevention Programs, the FAA is proposing to clarify regulatory language, increase consistency between the antidrug and alcohol misuse prevention program regulations where possible, and revise regulatory provisions as appropriate. Specifically, the FAA proposes to change the antidrug plan and alcohol misuse prevention certification statement submission requirements for employers and contractors. The FAA proposes to revise the timing of pre-employment testing. The FAA also proposes to modify the reasonable cause and reasonable suspicion testing requirements. The FAA believes that changing the regulations would improve safety and lessen a burden on the regulated public.
Transportation Department -- Civil Aviation Security Rules2002-Feb-2202-4081This rulemaking transfers the FAA's rules governing civil aviation security to TSA. This rulemaking also amends those rules to enhance security as required by recent legislation. This rulemaking also requires additional qualifications, training, and testing of individuals who screen persons and property that are carried in passenger aircraft. It is intended to improve the quality of screening conducted by aircraft operators and foreign air carriers. This rule is being adopted to improve the qualifications of individuals performing screening, and thereby to improve the level of security in air transportation. This will help ensure a smooth transition of aviation security from the FAA to TSA, and will avoid disruptions in air transportation due to any shortage of qualified screeners.
Transportation Department -- Flightcrew Compartment Access and Door Designs2002-Jan-1502-967This action supersedes SFAR 92-2, which was published on November 21, 2001 to allow operators to quickly modify the flightcrew compartment door to delay or deter unauthorized entry to the flightcrew compartment. This action temporarily authorizes variances from existing design standards for the doors and allows for approval for return to service of modified airplanes without prior approved data if the modification constitutes a major alteration. This action also mandates these modifications on aircraft in certain passenger and cargo carrying operations and extends the January 15, 2002, reporting date. This action prohibits the possession of flightdeck compartment door keys by other than the flightcrew during flight, unless the flightdeck door has an internal flightdeck locking device installed, operative, and in use. This action is being taken in the wake of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks against four U.S. commercial airplanes.
Transportation Department -- Flightcrew Compartment Access and Door Designs2001-Nov-2101-29280This action supersedes SFAR 92-1, which was published October 17, 2001, allowing air carriers to quickly modify the flightcrew compartment door to delay or deter unauthorized entry to the flightcrew compartment. This action temporarily authorizes variances from existing design standards for the doors and allows for approval for return to service of modified airplanes without prior approved data if the modification constitutes a major alteration. This action prohibits the possession of flightdeck compartment door keys by other than the flightcrew during flight, unless the flightdeck door has an internal flightdeck locking device installed, operative, and in use. This action also clarifies the 90 day and 180 day time frames in earlier versions of this SFAR with specific dates. This action is being taken in the wake of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks against four U.S. commercial airplanes.
Transportation Department -- Antidrug and Alcohol Misuse Prevention Programs for Personnel Engaged in Specified Aviation Activities2001-Nov-1901-28868The FAA is making minor technical amendments to its drug and alcohol regulations final rule, which was effective August 1, 2001. Since publication of the final rule, we have become aware of minor corrections that need to be made to avoid confusion. The effect of this technical amendment will be to correct the rule language to reflect the intent of the final rule.
Transportation Department -- Collision Avoidance Systems2001-Nov-0101-27340This document proposes to use airplane weight and performance characteristics to require a collision avoidance system on airplanes operating under part 121, 125, or 129. The current traffic alert and collision avoidance system (TCAS) rules for parts 121 and 125 require use of TCAS based on airplane weight and passenger-seating configuration criteria and, in some cases, combination passenger/cargo configuration criteria. Part 129 uses passenger-seating configuration and the type of airplane power plant. This proposal would require use of a collision avoidance system by all-cargo airplanes for the first time, and would standardize the requirements for all-cargo and passenger-carrying airplanes. In the past, cargo air carriers had small fleets which operated primarily at night. However, the air cargo industry has experienced rapid growth and cargo fleets are expanding. Also, cargo operations are increasingly occurring around the clock and those operations occur in airspace shared with passenger airplanes. Therefore, the FAA is proposing collision avoidance system requirements for certain cargo airplanes to minimize the possibility of midair collisions involving a cargo airplane. In addition, this proposal would standardize the collision avoidance system requirements for part 121, 125, and 129 airplanes.
Transportation Department -- Flightcrew Compartment Access and Door Designs2001-Oct-1701-26204This action supersedes SFAR 92 which was published October 9, 2001, by allowing certain air carriers to quickly modify the flightcrew compartment door to delay or deter unauthorized entry to the flightcrew compartment. This action temporarily authorizes variances from existing design standards for the doors and allows for approval for return to service of modified airplanes without prior approved data if the modification constitutes a major alteration. This action prohibits the possession of flightdeck compartment door keys by other than the flightcrew during flight. This action is being taken in the wake of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks against four U.S. commercial airplanes.
Transportation Department -- Flightcrew Compartment Access and Door Designs2001-Oct-0901-25376This action allows airline operators to quickly modify the flightcrew compartment door to delay or deter unauthorized entry to the flightcrew compartment. This action temporarily authorizes variances from existing design standards for the doors and allows for approval for return to service of modified airplanes without prior approved data if the modification constitutes a major alteration. This action prohibits the possession of flightdeck compartment door keys by cabin flight attendants during flight. This action is being taken in the wake of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks against four U.S. commercial airplanes.
Transportation Department -- Antidrug and Alcohol Misuse Prevention Programs for Personnel Engaged in Specified Aviation Activities2001-Aug-0901-19231The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is revising its drug and alcohol regulations. This final rule incorporates changes in the Department of Transportation (DOT) final rule, ``Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs,'' published December 19, 2000. In addition, this rule changes the drug testing program and alcohol misuse prevention program regulations in light of the amendments that have been made to the medical standards and certification requirements. Certain requirements under reasonable suspicion and post-accident alcohol testing have been eliminated because these requirements are outdated and no longer valid. Finally, this rule eliminates the approval process for consortia to be consistent with the other DOT Modal Administrations and the DOT Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs. The effect of these changes is to update and clarify the regulations based on DOT's revisions and previous FAA rulemakings.
Transportation Department -- Regulation of Fractional Aircraft Ownership Programs and On-Demand Operations2001-Jul-1801-17503The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) proposes to update and revise the regulations governing operations by aircraft in fractional ownership programs. This action is undertaken because the FAA has determined that current regulations do not adequately define fractional ownership programs and do not clearly allocate responsibility and authority for safety and compliance with the regulations. The proposed revisions would define fractional ownership programs and their various participants, allocate responsibility and authority for safety of flight operations for purposes of compliance with the regulations, and ensure that fractional ownership program aircraft operations maintain a high level of safety. Elements of this proposal would provide in certain of the regulations applicable to fractional ownership programs a level of safety equivalent to certain regulations that apply to on-demand operators. Changes are also proposed to some regulations that apply to on-demand operators meeting certain criteria to permit these operators an alternate means of compliance for certain commercial operations.
Transportation Department -- Parachute Operations2001-May-0901-11726This rule amends regulations that govern parachute operations. Amendments to these regulations reflect changes in the requirements applicable to radio communications, airspace classification, parachute packing, tandem parachute operations, and foreign parachutists. Through this rule, the FAA intends to enhance the safety of parachute operation in the National Airspace System (NAS).
Transportation Department -- Antidrug and Alcohol Misuse Prevention Programs for Personnel Engaged in Specified Aviation Activities2001-Apr-3001-9410<RM>This action proposes amendments to the industry drug and alcohol testing regulations to conform with the changes in the Department of Transportation's revision of its drug and alcohol testing procedures regulation, Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs. We also propose to change the antidrug and alcohol misuse prevention program regulations in light of the amendments that have been made to the medical standards and certification requirements. We further propose eliminating certain requirements under reasonable suspicion and post-accident alcohol testing because these requirements are outdated and no longer valid. These proposals are intended to update and clarify the regulations based on the Department of Transportation's revisions and previous FAA rulemakings.
Transportation Department -- Emergency Exits2001-Apr-2501-10238The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA or ``we'') is amending our regulations by removing an obsolete cross reference. This change is necessary to correct an error and will not impose any additional burdens or restrictions on persons or organizations affected by these regulations.
Transportation Department -- Emergency Medical Equipment2001-Apr-1201-8932This action responds to the Aviation Medical Assistance Act of 1998 by requiring that air carrier operators carry automated external defibrillators on large, passenger-carrying aircraft and augment currently required emergency medical kits. It affects those air carrier operations for which at least one flight attendant is required and includes provisions designed to provide the option of treatment of serious medical events during flight time.
Transportation Department -- Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park2000-Feb-0300-2406On December 31, 1996, the FAA published a final rule, Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park. That final rule codified the provisions of Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) No. 50-2, Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP); modified the dimensions of the GCNP Special Flight Rules Area (SFRA); established new and modified existing flight- free zones; established new and modified existing flight corridors; established reporting requirements for commercial sightseeing air carriers operating in the SFRA; prohibited commercial sightseeing operations during certain time periods; and limited the number of aircraft that can be used for commercial sightseeing operations in the SFRA. In February 1997 the FAA delayed the effective date for the new and modified flight-free zones, SFRA modification, and corridors portion of the final rule and reinstated portions of and amended the expiration date of SFAR No. 50-2. However, that action did not affect or delay the implementation of the curfew, aircraft limitations, reporting requirements, or other portions of the rule. That extension was subsequently extended until January 31, 2000. This action further delays the effective date for the flight-free zones, SFRA modification, and corridors portions of the December 31, 19996, final rule until January 31, 20001, and amends the expiration date of SFAR 50-2 until the FAA issues new regulations to substantially restore natural quite in GCNP.
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