Cargo Vessels

cargo-vessels
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
Homeland Security Department -- Cargo Securing Manuals2016-Aug-292016-20678The Coast Guard published an interim rule in the Federal Register on May 9, 2016, that prescribes when and how the loss or jettisoning of cargo at sea must be reported. That rule contained a typographical error that erroneously revised a force majeure regulation instead of a notice of hazardous conditions regulation. This document corrects that error.
Homeland Security Department -- Harmonization of Standards for Fire Protection, Detection, and Extinguishing Equipment2016-Jul-222016-15229The Coast Guard is issuing a final rule for certain design and approval standards for fire protection, detection, extinguishing equipment, and materials on inspected and uninspected vessels, outer continental shelf facilities, deepwater ports, and mobile offshore drilling units. This rule harmonizes Coast Guard approval processes for fire detection and alarm systems, and revises Coast Guard regulations for other types of equipment, materials, and components, such as spanner wrenches, non-metallic pipes, and sprinkler systems. This rule ensures Coast Guard regulations remain current and addresses advances in technology.
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2016-Jul-062016-15660This final rule makes non-substantive technical, organizational, and conforming amendments to existing regulations throughout title 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations to reorganize Coast Guard offices responsible for administering the Mariner Credentialing Program. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Homeland Security Department -- Inspection of Towing Vessels2016-Jun-202016-12857The Coast Guard is establishing safety regulations governing the inspection, standards, and safety management systems of towing vessels. We are taking this action because the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2004 reclassified towing vessels as vessels subject to inspection and authorized the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security to establish requirements for a safety management system appropriate for the characteristics, methods of operation, and nature of service of towing vessels. This rule, which includes provisions covering specific electrical and machinery requirements for new and existing towing vessels, the use and approval of third-party organizations, and procedures for obtaining Certificates of Inspection, will become effective July 20, 2016. However, certain existing towing vessels subject to this rule will have an additional 2 years before having to comply with most of its requirements.
Homeland Security Department -- Cargo Securing Manuals2016-May-092016-10725The Coast Guard is issuing an interim rule to require U.S. and foreign self-propelled cargo vessels of 500 gross tons or more, traveling on international voyages and carrying cargo that is other than solid or liquid bulk cargo, to have cargo securing manuals (CSMs) on board. The rule also requires those vessels to comply with certain provisions of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 as amended (SOLAS), authorizes recognized classification societies or other approval authorities to review and approve CSMs on behalf of the Coast Guard; and prescribes when and how the loss or jettisoning of cargo at sea must be reported. The Coast Guard requests public comment on its intention to extend, in a subsequent final rule, this interim rule's requirement for vessel CSMs to self-propelled cargo vessels under 500 gross tons, if these vessels carry dangerous goods in packaged form on international voyages. This interim rule promotes the Coast Guard's maritime safety and stewardship (environmental protection) missions, helps fulfill U.S. treaty obligations, and could help prevent or mitigate the consequences of vessel cargo loss.
Homeland Security Department -- Commercial Fishing Vessels Dispensing Petroleum Products2016-Mar-142016-05262The Coast Guard is revising its safety regulations for uninspected commercial fishing vessels (CFVs) carrying flammable or combustible liquid cargoes in bulk. The revisions align the regulations with the current applicable statute and make minor nonsubstantive changes. This rule promotes the Coast Guard's maritime safety and stewardship (environmental protection) missions.
Homeland Security Department -- 2013 Liquid Chemical Categorization Updates2015-Oct-222015-26371The Coast Guard proposes additional updates and revisions to regulatory tables that were amended by an interim rule published in August 2013. The tables list liquid hazardous materials, liquefied gases, and compressed gases approved for maritime transportation in bulk, and indicate how each cargo is categorized by its pollution risk and safe carriage requirements. These proposals would correct errors in the interim rule and bring the tables current through December 2013. Updated information is of value to shippers and to the owners and operators of U.S.-flag tank and bulk cargo vessels in any waters, and most foreign-flag tank and oceangoing bulk cargo vessels in U.S. waters. The proposed rule promotes the Coast Guard's maritime safety and stewardship (environmental protection) missions.
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2015-Oct-162015-26119This final rule makes non-substantive technical, organizational, and conforming amendments to existing regulations throughout Title 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Homeland Security Department -- MARPOL Annex I Amendments2015-Feb-042015-01925In this final rule the Coast Guard is updating our regulations to harmonize U.S. regulations with international conventions regarding oil pollution. We are amending the regulations covering Title 33: Navigation and Navigable Waters to align with recent amendments to Annex I of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978, which were adopted by the International Maritime Organization's Marine Environment Protection Committee during its 52nd, 54th, 55th, and 59th sessions. This final rule also amends sections of the Vessel Response Plan regulations to include the Safety of Life at Sea Material Safety Data Sheets as an equivalent hazardous communications standard.
Homeland Security Department -- Vessel Requirements for Notices of Arrival and Departure, and Automatic Identification System2015-Jan-302015-01331Consistent with statutory requirements and provisions, the Coast Guard is expanding the applicability of notice of arrival (NOA) and automatic identification system (AIS) requirements to include more commercial vessels. This final rule amends the applicability of notice of arrival requirements to include additional vessels, sets forth a mandatory method for electronic submission of NOAs, and modifies related reporting content, timeframes, and procedures. This final rule also extends the applicability of AIS requirements beyond Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) areas to all U.S. navigable waters, and requires that additional commercial vessels install and use AIS, consistent with statutory requirements, and in limited cases, the Secretary's discretionary authority. These changes will improve navigation safety, enhance our ability to identify and track vessels, and heighten our overall maritime domain awareness (MDA), thus helping us address threats to maritime transportation safety and security.
Homeland Security Department -- Offshore Supply Vessels of at Least 6,000 GT ITC2014-Oct-172014-24716The Coast Guard published an interim rule in the Federal Register on August 18, 2014, to ensure the safe carriage of oil, hazardous substances, and individuals in addition to the crew on U.S.- flagged OSVs of at least 6,000 gross tonnage as measured under the Convention Measurement System. In that interim rule, we revised a paragraph listing consensus standards incorporated by reference. In doing so, we inadvertently duplicated two paragraphs and presented others out of order. This correction resolves that error by removing the doubled paragraphs and reordering the others.
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping and Transportation; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2014-Sep-292014-21994The Coast Guard is issuing a final rule that makes non- substantive changes throughout Title 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public. These changes are provided to coincide with the annual recodification of Titles 46 and 49 on October 1, 2014.
Homeland Security Department -- Lifesaving Devices-Uninspected Commercial Barges and Sailing Vessels2014-Sep-102014-21541The Coast Guard is aligning its regulations with the 2010 Coast Guard Authorization Act. Before 2010, certain uninspected commercial vessels including barges and sailing vessels fell outside the scope of the statute requiring the Coast Guard to regulate lifesaving devices on uninspected vessels. Lifesaving devices were required on such uninspected commercial vessels only if they carried passengers for hire. The 2010 Act brought all uninspected commercial vessels within the scope of the statutory requirement to carry lifesaving devices even if they carry no passengers for hire. The effect of the 2010 Act was to bring, for the first time, uninspected non-passenger commercial barges and sailing vessels within the scope of the lifesaving devices requirement. The Coast Guard is now requiring the use of wearable personal flotation devices for individuals on board those vessels, and amending several regulatory tables to reflect that requirement. This rulemaking promotes the Coast Guard's marine safety mission.
Homeland Security Department -- Commercial Fishing Vessels Dispensing Petroleum Products2014-Aug-202014-19142The Coast Guard proposes revisions to its regulations for commercial fishing vessels carrying flammable or combustible liquid cargoes in bulk. The proposed revisions would reflect a 1984 statutory change that eliminated fishery-specific and geographical limitations on a statutory exemption that, effectively, permits certain commercial fishing vessels to carry and dispense flammable and combustible material including petroleum products; additionally, this proposed revision would simplify regulatory text. This notice of proposed rulemaking promotes the Coast Guard's maritime safety mission.
Homeland Security Department -- Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2014-Jul-072014-14897This final rule makes non-substantive changes throughout Title 33 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this final rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard navigation and navigable waters regulations. These changes will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Homeland Security Department -- Double Hull Tanker Escorts on the Waters of Prince William Sound, Alaska2014-Jun-132014-13809The Coast Guard is finalizing the escort requirements for double hull tankers over 5,000 gross tons transporting oil in bulk on the waters of Prince William Sound, Alaska (PWS). This final rule mandates two tug escorts for these tankers. The Coast Guard previously published an interim rule on August 19, 2013. Section 711 of the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2010 directed the Coast Guard to promulgate regulations as soon as practicable to ensure that tug escort requirements apply to these double hull tankers.
Homeland Security Department -- Harmonization of Standards for Fire Protection, Detection, and Extinguishing Equipment2014-Jan-132013-29863The Coast Guard proposes to amend its regulations for certain design and approval standards for fire protection, detection, and extinguishing equipment on inspected and uninspected vessels, outer continental shelf facilities, deepwater ports, and mobile offshore drilling units. The proposed amendments would harmonize Coast Guard regulations with appropriate national and international consensus standards; address advances in fire protection technologies and standards; update Coast Guard approval processes for fire detection and alarm systems; and revise Coast Guard regulations for other types of equipment or components, such as spanner wrenches, non-metallic pipes, and sprinkler systems. These proposed changes are necessary to ensure Coast Guard regulations remain current and address advances in technology.
Homeland Security Department -- Implementation of the Amendments to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, and Changes to National Endorsements2013-Dec-242013-28032The Coast Guard issues this final rule to implement the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, as amended (STCW Convention), as well as the Seafarers' Training, Certification and Watchkeeping Code (STCW Code), to address the comments received from the public in response to the supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking (SNPRM), and to incorporate the 2010 amendments to the STCW Convention that came into force on January 1, 2012. In addition, this final rule makes other changes not required by the STCW Convention or Code, but necessary to reorganize, clarify, and update these regulations.
Homeland Security Department -- Cargo Securing Manuals2013-Nov-152013-26886The Coast Guard proposes requiring cargo securing manuals (CSMs) on vessels of 500 gross tons or more traveling on international voyages and carrying cargo that is other than solid or liquid bulk cargo. The proposed regulations would authorize recognized classification societies or other approval authorities to review and approve CSMs on behalf of the Coast Guard. They would also prescribe when and how the loss or jettisoning of cargo at sea must be reported. The proposed regulations would help fulfill U.S. treaty obligations and could help prevent or mitigate the consequences of vessel cargo loss. This rulemaking promotes the Coast Guard's maritime safety and stewardship missions.
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping and Transportation; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2013-Sep-302013-22624The Coast Guard is issuing a final rule that makes non- substantive changes throughout titles 46 and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard shipping and transportation regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public. These changes are provided to coincide with the annual recodification of titles 46 and 49 on October 1, 2013.
Homeland Security Department -- Bulk Packaging To Allow for Transfer of Hazardous Liquid Cargoes2013-Sep-062013-21627The Coast Guard is amending its regulations concerning the transfer of hazardous materials to and from bulk packaging on vessels. The Coast Guard is expanding the list of bulk packaging approved for hazardous material transfers to include International Maritime Organization (IMO) Type 1 and Type 2 portable tanks, United Nations (UN) portable tanks, and Intermediate Bulk Containers (IBCs). The Coast Guard is also expanding the list of allowed hazardous materials to provide greater flexibility in the selection and use of packaging in the transportation of hazardous materials. This rule will eliminate the need to obtain special permits or Competent Authority Approvals to use IMO Type 1 or Type 2 portable tanks, UN portable tanks, or IBCs.
Homeland Security Department -- Seagoing Barges2013-Aug-292013-20351The Coast Guard is revising several vessel inspection and certification regulations to align them with a statutory definition of ``seagoing barge'' and with a statutory exemption from inspection and certification requirements for certain seagoing barges. The revisions are intended to eliminate ambiguity in existing regulations, to reduce the potential for confusion among the regulated public, and to help the Coast Guard perform its maritime safety and stewardship missions.
Homeland Security Department -- Double Hull Tanker Escorts on the Waters of Prince William Sound, Alaska2013-Aug-192013-20075The Coast Guard is amending the escort requirements for certain tankers operating on the waters of Prince William Sound, Alaska (PWS). This interim rule is necessary to implement section 711 of the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2010 (Act), which mandates two tug escorts for double hull tankers over 5,000 gross tons transporting oil in bulk in PWS. The Act directed the Coast Guard to promulgate interim regulations as soon and practicable to ensure that tug escort requirements apply to certain double hull tankers.
Homeland Security Department -- 2012 Liquid Chemical Categorization Updates2013-Aug-162013-19422The Coast Guard is updating and revising regulatory tables that list liquid hazardous materials, liquefied gases, and compressed gases that have been approved for maritime transportation in bulk, and that indicate how each substance's pollution potential has been categorized. The interim rule provides new information about approved substances and their categorizations, but would not make any changes in which substances are approved or how each substance is categorized. Updated information is of value to shippers and to the owners and operators of U.S.-flag tank and bulk cargo vessels in any waters and most foreign-flag tank and oceangoing bulk cargo vessels in U.S. waters. This interim rule promotes the Coast Guard's maritime safety and stewardship missions.
Homeland Security Department -- Lifesaving Devices-Uninspected Commercial Barges and Sailing Vessels2013-Jul-172013-16955The Coast Guard proposes aligning its regulations with the 2010 Coast Guard Authorization Act. Before 2010, uninspected commercial barges and uninspected commercial sailing vessels fell outside the scope of a statute requiring the regulation of lifesaving devices on uninspected vessels. Lifesaving devices were required on uninspected commercial barges and sailing vessels only if they carried passengers for hire. The 2010 Act brought uninspected commercial barges and sailing vessels within the scope of the statutory requirement to carry lifesaving devices even if they carry no passengers. The Coast Guard proposes requiring use of wearable personal flotation devices for individuals on board uninspected commercial barges and sailing vessels, and amending several regulatory tables to reflect that requirement. This rulemaking promotes the Coast Guard's marine safety mission.
Homeland Security Department -- Marine Vapor Control Systems2013-Jul-162013-15808The Coast Guard is revising existing safety regulations for facility and vessel vapor control systems (VCSs) to promote maritime safety and marine environmental protection. The revisions promote safe VCS operation in an expanded range of activities now subject to current Federal and State environmental requirements, reflect industry advances in VCS technology, and codify the standards for the design and operation of a VCS at tank barge cleaning facilities. They increase operational safety by regulating the design, installation, and use of VCSs, but they do not require anyone to install or use VCSs.
Homeland Security Department -- Updates to Standards Incorporated by Reference; Reapproved ASTM Standards; Technical Amendment2013-Feb-272013-03724Many of the Coast Guard's regulations incorporate by reference consensus standards that are developed by organizations other than the Coast Guard. This final rule updates references to standards developed by ASTM International, that have been reapproved, without change, since their incorporation into Coast Guard regulation. This rule does not address standards that have changed substantively, and it will not have any substantive impact on the regulated public.
Homeland Security Department -- Seagoing Barges2013-Jan-092012-30984The Coast Guard is proposing to revise several vessel inspection and certification regulations to align them with a statutory definition of ``seagoing barge'' and with an exemption from inspection and certification requirements for certain seagoing barges. The proposed revisions are intended to eliminate ambiguity in existing regulations, to reduce the potential for confusion among the regulated public, and to help the Coast Guard perform its maritime safety and stewardship missions.
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping and Transportation; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2012-Oct-012012-23551This final rule makes non-substantive changes throughout Titles 46 and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard shipping and transportation regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public. These changes are provided to coincide with the annual recodification of Titles 46 and 49 on October 1, 2012.
Homeland Security Department -- Alternate Tonnage Threshold for Oil Spill Response Vessels2012-Jun-292012-15976The Coast Guard is establishing an alternate size threshold based on the measurement system established under the International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships, 1969, for oil spill response vessels, which are properly certificated under 46 CFR chapter I, subchapter L. The present size threshold of 500 gross register tons is based on the U.S. regulatory measurement system. This final rule provides an alternative for owners and operators of offshore supply vessels that may result in an increase in oil spill response capacity and capability. This final rule adopts, without change, the interim rule amending 46 CFR part 126 published in the Federal Register on Monday, December 12, 2011.
Homeland Security Department -- Carbon Dioxide Fire Suppression Systems on Commercial Vessels2012-Jun-072012-12334The Coast Guard is amending the current regulations for fire suppression systems on several classes of commercial vessels. The amendments clarify that approved alternatives to carbon dioxide systems may be used to protect some spaces on these vessels, and set general requirements for alternative systems. Additionally, certain new carbon dioxide systems must be equipped with lockout valves and odorizing units to protect persons after a carbon dioxide discharge. By requiring these features on carbon dioxide systems and by making a wider range of fire suppression systems available, the regulations advance the Coast Guard's strategic goals of promoting marine safety and maritime mobility.
Homeland Security Department -- MARPOL Annex I Amendments2012-Apr-092012-7919In this notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM), we are proposing to update our regulations to harmonize U.S. regulations with international conventions regarding oil pollution and safety of life at sea. The Coast Guard proposes to amend our regulations covering Navigation and Navigable Waters to align with recent amendments to Annex I of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978, which were adopted by the Marine Environment Protection Committee during its 52nd, 54th, 56th, and 59th sessions. In addition, we are proposing to incorporate guidance from the Maritime Safety Committee, based on updates to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea 1974, into our regulations covering shipping. Finally, we are seeking public comment on an alternative to add a requirement that some new U.S. non-oceangoing vessels be equipped with an oily bilge water storage tank.
Homeland Security Department -- Seagoing Barges2012-Mar-292012-4762The United States Coast Guard published a direct final rule in the Federal Register on December 14, 2011 (76 FR 77712) revising regulations for the inspection and certification of seagoing barges to align with the language of the applicable statues. That document inadvertently transposed the titles of two tables in our amendatory instructions. Additionally, the Coast Guard is republishing the vessel inspection tables that rule amends in their entirety, so that the format of the tables is consistent with current Federal Register format requirements.
Homeland Security Department -- Interest on Untimely Paid Vessel Repair Duties2012-Mar-262012-7229This document adopts as a final rule, without change, the proposed amendments to the CBP regulations that provide that where an owner or master of a vessel documented under the laws of the United States fails to timely pay the duties determined to be due to CBP that are associated with the purchase of equipment for, or repair to, the vessel while it is outside the United States, interest will accrue on the amounts owed to CBP and that person will be liable for interest. The purpose of this document is to ensure that the CBP regulations reflect that CBP collects interest as part of its inherent revenue collection functions in situations where an owner or master of a vessel fails to pay the vessel repair duties determined to be due within 30 days of CBP issuing the bill.
Homeland Security Department -- Bulk Packaging To Allow for Transfer of Hazardous Liquid Cargoes2012-Mar-092012-5551The Coast Guard proposes to amend its regulations concerning the transfer of hazardous materials to and from portable tanks on vessels. The Coast Guard proposes to expand the list of portable tanks approved for hazardous material transfers to include IMO Type 1 and IMO Type 2 portable tanks, UN portable tanks, and Intermediate Bulk Containers. In addition, the Coast Guard proposes to expand the list of allowed hazardous materials. The proposed amendments would provide greater flexibility in the selection and use of portable tanks and would allow for the transport of additional hazardous materials. The proposed effect would be to eliminate the need to obtain special permits or Competent Authority Approvals to use IMO Type 1 or IMO Type 2 portable tanks, UN portable tanks, or Intermediate Bulk Containers, or to transport hazardous materials not on the list.
Homeland Security Department -- Seagoing Barges2011-Dec-142011-32007By this direct final rule, the Coast Guard is revising regulations for the inspection and certification of seagoing barges to align with the language of the applicable statutes. The statutory language exempts certain seagoing barges from inspection. Through this rule, we seek to make the language of the regulation consistent with the language of the statute.
Homeland Security Department -- Alternate Tonnage Threshold for Oil Spill Response Vessels2011-Dec-122011-31708The Coast Guard is establishing an alternate size threshold based on the measurement system established under the International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships, 1969, for Oil Spill Response Vessels (OSRVs), which are properly certificated under 46 CFR subchapter L. The present size threshold of 500 gross registered tons is based on the U.S. regulatory measurement system. This rule provides an alternative for owners and operators of offshore supply vessels (OSVs) that may result in an increase in oil spill response capacity and capability.
Homeland Security Department -- Addition of the Cook Islands to the List of Nations Entitled to Special Tonnage Tax Exemption2011-Nov-032011-28472The Department of State has informed U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) that discriminating or countervailing duties are not imposed by the government of the Cook Islands on vessels owned by citizens of the United States. Accordingly, vessels of the Cook Islands are exempt from special tonnage taxes and light money in ports of the United States. This document amends the CBP regulations by adding the Cook Islands to the list of nations whose vessels are exempt from payment of any higher tonnage duties than are applicable to vessels of the United States and from the payment of light money.
Homeland Security Department -- Lifesaving Equipment: Production Testing and Harmonization With International Standards2011-Oct-112011-25035The Coast Guard is amending its regulations for certain lifesaving equipment, including launching appliances (winches and davits), release mechanisms, survival craft (lifeboats, inflatable liferafts, and inflatable buoyant apparatuses), rescue boats, and automatic disengaging devices. The amended regulations harmonize the Coast Guard's design, construction, and performance standards for this lifesaving equipment with international standards. In addition, the regulations provide for the use of qualified independent laboratories, instead of Coast Guard inspectors, during the approval process and for production inspections of certain types of lifesaving equipment. Because the International Maritime Organization (IMO) has recently changed its international standards for lifeboat release mechanisms, the Coast Guard is issuing these amended regulations as an interim rule and will finalize the regulations after proposing amendments as necessary to address the recent IMO changes regarding release mechanisms. Additionally, recent IMO action modified the international standards for liferafts, and the Coast Guard is proposing new changes to its regulations to implement the modified international standards. The Coast Guard is publishing the proposal regarding liferafts separately in the Proposed Rules section of this issue of the Federal Register.
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping and Transportation; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2011-Sep-302011-25276This final rule makes non-substantive changes throughout Titles 46 and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard shipping and transportation regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public. These changes are provided to coincide with the annual recodification of Titles 46 and 49 on October 1, 2011.
Homeland Security Department -- Implementation of the Amendments to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, and Changes to Domestic Endorsements.2011-Aug-012011-17093The Coast Guard proposes to amend the existing regulations that implement the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, as amended (STCW Convention), as well as the Seafarer's Training, Certification and Watchkeeping Code (STCW Code). The changes proposed in this Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (SNPRM) address the comments received from the public response to the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), in most cases through revisions based on those comments, and propose to incorporate the 2010 amendments to the STCW Convention that will come into force on January 1, 2012. In addition, this SNPRM proposes to make other non-STCW changes necessary to reorganize, clarify, and update these regulations.
Homeland Security Department -- Interest on Untimely Paid Vessel Repair Duties2011-Apr-012011-7815This document proposes to amend title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations (19 CFR) to provide that where an owner or master of a vessel documented under the laws of the United States fails to timely pay the duties determined to be due to Customs and Border Protection (CBP) that are associated with the purchase of equipment for, or repair to, the vessel while it is outside the United States, interest will accrue on the amounts owed to CBP and that person will be liable for interest. The purpose of this document is to ensure that title 19 of the CFR reflects that CBP collects interest as part of its inherent revenue collection functions in situations where an owner or master of a vessel fails to pay the vessel repair duties determined to be due within 30 days of CBP issuing the bill.
Homeland Security Department -- Passenger Weight and Inspected Vessel Stability Requirements2010-Dec-142010-30391The Coast Guard amends its regulations governing the maximum weight and number of passengers that may safely be permitted on board a vessel and other stability regulations, including increasing the Assumed Average Weight per Person (AAWPP) to 185 lb. The Coast Guard determines the maximum number of persons permitted on a vessel by several factors, including an assumed average weight for each passenger, which is in need of an update because the average American weighs significantly more than the assumed weight per person utilized in current regulations. Updating regulations to more accurately reflect today's average weight per person will maintain intended safety levels by accounting for this weight increase. The Coast Guard is also taking this opportunity to improve and update intact stability and subdivision and damage stability regulations.
Homeland Security Department -- Technical Corrections to Customs and Border Protection Regulations2010-Nov-152010-28709Customs and Border Protection (CBP) periodically reviews its regulations to ensure that they are current, correct, and consistent. Through this review process, CBP discovered a number of discrepancies. This document amends various sections of title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations to remedy those discrepancies.
Homeland Security Department -- Marine Vapor Control Systems2010-Oct-212010-25384The Coast Guard proposes to increase maritime domain safety by revising existing safety regulations for facility and vessel vapor control systems (VCSs). The proposed changes would make VCS requirements more compatible with new Federal and State environmental requirements, reflect industry advancements in VCS technology, and codify the standards for the design and operation of a VCS at tank barge cleaning facilities. These changes would increase the safety of operations by regulating the design, installation, and use of VCSs, but would not require anyone to install or use VCSs.
Homeland Security Department -- Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code2010-Oct-192010-25383The Coast Guard is harmonizing its regulations with amendments to Chapter VI and Chapter VII of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended, (SOLAS) that make the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code mandatory. The amendments require that all vessels subject to SOLAS, and carrying bulk solid cargoes other than grain, comply with the IMSBC Code. The Coast Guard is amending its regulations governing the carriage of solid hazardous materials in bulk to allow use of the IMSBC Code as an equivalent form of compliance for all domestic and foreign vessels operating in U.S. navigable waters. The amended Coast Guard regulations also expand the list of solid hazardous materials authorized for bulk transportation by vessel and include special handling procedures based on the IMSBC Code and existing special permits. These changes reduce the need for the current special permits required for the carriage of certain solid hazardous materials in bulk.
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2010-Sep-292010-23766This final rule makes non-substantive changes throughout Title 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public. These changes are provided to coincide with the annual recodification of Title 46 on October 1, 2010.
Homeland Security Department -- Lifesaving Equipment: Production Testing and Harmonization With International Standards2010-Aug-312010-20917The Coast Guard proposes to amend its regulations for certain lifesaving equipment, including launching appliances (winches and davits), release mechanisms, survival craft (lifeboats, inflatable liferafts, and inflatable buoyant apparatuses), rescue boats, and automatic disengaging devices. The proposed rules would harmonize the Coast Guard's design, construction, and performance standards for this lifesaving equipment with international standards. In addition, the proposed rules would provide for the use of qualified independent laboratories, instead of Coast Guard inspectors, during the approval process and for production inspections of certain types of lifesaving equipment.
Homeland Security Department -- Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2010-Jun-252010-14620This rule makes non-substantive changes throughout Title 33 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard navigation and navigable waters regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public. These changes are provided to coincide with the annual recodification of Title 33 on July 1.
Homeland Security Department -- Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code2010-Jun-172010-14464The Coast Guard proposes to harmonize its regulations with International Maritime Organization (IMO) amendments to Chapter VI and Chapter VII to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended, (SOLAS) that make the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code mandatory. The amendments require that all vessels subject to SOLAS and carrying bulk solid cargoes other than grain must comply with the IMSBC Code. The Coast Guard proposes to amend its regulations governing the carriage of solid hazardous materials in bulk to allow use of the IMSBC Code as an equivalent form of compliance for all domestic and foreign vessels operating in U.S. navigable waters. Proposed changes to the Coast Guard regulations will also expand the list of solid hazardous materials authorized for bulk transportation by vessel and include special handling procedures based on the IMSBC Code and existing special permits. These proposed changes would reduce the need for the current special permits for the carriage of certain solid hazardous materials in bulk.
Homeland Security Department -- Carbon Dioxide Fire Suppression Systems on Commercial Vessels2010-Feb-242010-3094The Coast Guard proposes to amend the current regulations for fire suppression systems on several classes of commercial vessels. The amendments would clarify that approved alternatives to carbon dioxide systems may be used to protect some spaces on these vessels and would set general requirements for alternative systems. Additionally, new and existing carbon dioxide systems, when used in spaces that can be accessed by persons onboard the specified commercial vessels, would need to be equipped with lockout valves and olfactory additives to protect persons in the event of a carbon dioxide discharge. By requiring these features on carbon dioxide systems and by making a wider range of fire suppression systems available, the proposed regulations advance the Coast Guard's mission of promoting maritime safety and mobility.
Homeland Security Department -- Pollution Prevention Equipment2009-Oct-139-24670The Coast Guard is finalizing its January 16, 2009, interim rule establishing oil pollution prevention equipment requirements with one minor amendment to the rule's effective date for vessels with equipment installed on or after January 1, 2005. The rule harmonizes Coast Guard regulations with new International Maritime Organization (IMO) guidelines and specifications issued under the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) Annex I. It implements these MARPOL Annex I regulations and, ultimately, is intended to reduce the amount of oil discharged from vessels and eliminate the use of ozone-depleting solvents in equipment tests. All vessels replacing or installing oily-water separators and bilge alarms must install equipment that meets these revised standards. Newly constructed vessels carrying oil in bulk must install monitoring systems that meet the revised standards.
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping; Transportation; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2009-Sep-259-21588This rule makes non-substantive changes throughout Titles 46 and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public. These changes are provided to coincide with the annual recodification of Titles 46 and 49 on October 1.
Homeland Security Department -- Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational and Conforming Amendments2009-Jun-109-13370This rule makes non-substantive changes throughout Title 33 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard navigation and navigable water regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public. These changes are provided to coincide with the annual recodification of Title 33 in July.
Homeland Security Department -- Consolidation of Merchant Mariner Qualification Credentials2009-Mar-169-5436The Coast Guard issues this final rule to consolidate the regulations covering issuance of merchant mariner qualification credentials, to reduce the burden on mariners by limiting the number of times they need to appear in person to provide fingerprints and proof of identity, and to address comments received from the public in response to the Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, in some cases through revisions based on those comments. This final rule works in tandem with the joint final rule published by the Coast Guard and the Transportation Security Administration on January 25, 2007, entitled ``Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) Implementation in the Maritime Sector; Hazardous Materials Endorsement for a Commercial Driver's License''.
Homeland Security Department -- Pollution Prevention Equipment2009-Jan-169-802The Coast Guard is amending its oil pollution prevention equipment regulations to make them consistent with new International Maritime Organization (IMO) guidelines and specifications issued under the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) Annex I. These revisions will implement MARPOL Annex I regulations and are intended to reduce the amount of oil discharged from vessels and eliminate the use of ozone-depleting solvents in equipment tests. This interim rule will require all vessels replacing or installing oil separators and bilge alarms to install equipment that meets revised standards and it will require newly constructed vessels carrying oil in bulk to install monitoring systems that meet the revised standards. We have delayed the implementation of three paragraphs involving vessels constructed and equipment installed on or after January 1, 2005. We seek comments on these three paragraphs and will consider those comments before issuing a final rule.
Homeland Security Department -- Review and Update of Standards for Marine Equipment2008-Oct-318-22723The Coast Guard amends its rules relating to standards for marine equipment and updates the incorporation in those rules of references to national and international safety standards. This rule is part of an ongoing effort for regulatory review and reform that increases the focus on results, decreases the focus on process, and expands compliance options for the regulated public.
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2008-Sep-298-21884This rule makes non-substantive changes throughout Title 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard shipping regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public. These changes are provided to coincide with the annual recodification of Title 46 on October 1.
Homeland Security Department -- Passenger Weight and Inspected Vessel Stability Requirements2008-Aug-208-18791The Coast Guard proposes to amend its regulations governing the stability of passenger vessels and the maximum number of passengers that may safely be permitted on board a vessel. The average American weighs significantly more than the assumed average weight per person utilized in current regulations, and the maximum number of persons permitted on a vessel is determined by several factors, including an assumed average weight for each passenger. Updating regulations to more accurately reflect today's average weight per person will maintain intended safety levels by taking this weight increase into account. The Coast Guard is also taking this opportunity to clarify and update intact stability and subdivision and damage stability regulations.
Homeland Security Department -- Uniform Rules of Origin for Imported Merchandise2008-Jul-258-17025This document proposes to amend the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (``CBP'') Regulations to establish uniform rules governing CBP determinations of the country of origin of imported merchandise. This proposal would extend application of the country of origin rules codified in 19 CFR part 102. Those rules have proven to be more objective and transparent and provide greater predictability in determining the country of origin of imported merchandise than the system of case-by-case adjudication they would replace. The proposed change also will aid an importer's exercise of reasonable care. In addition, this document proposes to amend the country of origin rules applicable to pipe fittings and flanges, printed greeting cards, glass optical fiber, and rice preparations. Finally, this document proposes amendments to the textile regulations set forth in Sec. 102.21 to make corrections so that the regulations reflect the language of section 334(b)(5) of the Uruguay Round Agreement Act.
Homeland Security Department -- Technical Corrections to Customs and Border Protection Regulations2008-Jul-168-15622Customs and Border Protection (CBP) periodically reviews its regulations to ensure that they are current, correct, and consistent. Through this review process, CBP discovered a number of discrepancies. This document amends various sections of title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations to remedy those discrepancies.
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2008-Jun-258-14293This rule makes non-substantive changes to Title 46, part 31 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard shipping regulations. Specifically, this final rule updates 46 CFR 31.10-16 concerning inspection and certification of shipboard cargo gear. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Homeland Security Department -- Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2008-Jun-198-12643This rule makes non-substantive changes throughout Title 33 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard navigation and navigable water regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public. These changes are provided to coincide with the annual recodification of Title 33 in July.
Homeland Security Department -- Addition of Lithuania to the List of Nations Entitled to Special Tonnage Tax Exemption2008-Mar-108-4641Pursuant to information provided by the Department of State, Customs and Border Protection has found that no discriminating or countervailing duties are imposed by the government of Lithuania on vessels owned by citizens of the United States. Accordingly, vessels of Lithuania are exempt from special tonnage taxes and light money in ports of the United States. This document amends title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations by adding Lithuania to the list of nations whose vessels are exempt from payment of any higher tonnage duties than are applicable to vessels of the United States and from the payment of light money.
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2007-Sep-217-18433This rule makes non-substantive changes throughout Title 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard shipping regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Homeland Security Department -- Coast Guard Sector, Marine Inspection Zone, and Captain of the Port Zone Structure; Technical Amendment2007-Jul-0207-3189This rule makes non-substantive amendments throughout titles 33 and 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations, in order to align with changes in the Coast Guard's internal organization that resulted from the Coast Guard's recent sector realignment. The amendments typically describe the boundaries of sectors, marine inspection zones, and Captain of the Port zones; describe the reporting relationship between various field units; or reflect a change in the identity of the field unit that is responsible for a particular matter. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Homeland Security Department -- Consolidation of Merchant Mariner Qualification Credentials2007-Jan-2507-18The Coast Guard issues this Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (SNPRM) for the Consolidation of Merchant Mariner Qualification Credentials rulemaking project to amend its Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) published in May 2006. The purpose of this SNPRM is to address comments received from the public on the NPRM, revise the proposed rule based on those comments, and provide the public with an additional opportunity to comment on the proposed revisions. This revised proposed rule would work in tandem with the joint final rule published by the Coast Guard and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) published elsewhere in today's Federal Register entitled ``Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) Implementation in the Maritime Sector; Hazardous Materials Endorsement for a Commercial Driver's License''.
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping and Transportation; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2006-Sep-2506-8133This rule makes non-substantive changes throughout Titles 46 and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard navigation and navigable water regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Homeland Security Department -- Mariner Licensing and Documentation Program Restructuring and Centralization2006-Aug-216-13532This technical amendment authorizes the Commanding Officer, National Maritime Center, to perform certain mariner credentialing functions in addition to Officers in Charge, Marine Inspection, who currently perform those functions. At the end of a transitional period, most credentialing functions will be consolidated at a centralized location. The amendment also makes technical changes to the mariner credentialing appellate process. This rule is organizational in nature and will have no substantive effect on the regulated public. The amendment also will have no effect on any other Coast Guard regulatory projects or policy initiatives.
Homeland Security Department -- Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments2006-Jul-126-10890This rule makes non-substantive changes throughout Title 33 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard navigation and navigable water regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Homeland Security Department -- Consolidation of Merchant Mariner Qualification Credentials2006-May-2206-4509The Coast Guard proposes to streamline the existing merchant mariner credentialing process to minimize redundant requirements and simplify the credentialing program. This proposed rule works in tandem with the joint Notice of Proposed Rulemaking published by the Coast Guard and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) entitled ``Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) Implementation in the Maritime Sector; Hazardous Materials Endorsement for a Commercial Driver's License'' published elsewhere in the Federal Register today. It proposes to combine the individual Merchant Mariner's Document, License, Certificate of Registry, and STCW Endorsement into a single certificate termed the Merchant Mariner Credential (MMC), which will be endorsed to reflect a mariner's qualifications. The Coast Guard also proposes to streamline the application process for the MMC by removing the requirement that all mariners appear at least once at one of 17 Regional Exam Centers (RECs). Instead, the information previously submitted by the applicant at the REC would be submitted to TSA through the TWIC enrollment process and shared with the Coast Guard by TSA.
Homeland Security Department -- Pollution Prevention Equipment2005-Nov-0305-21573The Coast Guard proposes to revise its pollution prevention equipment regulations to make them consistent with new International Maritime Organization (IMO) guidelines and specifications issued under the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) Annex I. These revisions should effectively implement MARPOL Annex I regulations, reduce the amount of oil discharged from vessels, and eliminate the use of ozone-depleting solvents in equipment tests. The proposed rule would require newly constructed vessels carrying oil in bulk to install cargo monitors that meet revised standards and require all vessels replacing or installing oil separators and bilge alarms to install equipment that meets revised standards. Tests for approval of this equipment would also be revised both to deal with common bilge contaminants and to eliminate the use of ozone-depleting solvents.
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping; Technical, Organizational and Conforming Amendments2005-Sep-3005-19723This rule makes non-substantive changes throughout Title 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard shipping and transportation regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping and Transportation; Technical, Organizational and Conforming Amendments2004-Nov-2304-25967This document contains corrections to the Shipping and Transportation; Technical, Organizational and Conforming Amendments final rule for Titles 46 and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (USCG-2004-18884) published on September 30, 2004, in the Federal Register (69 FR 58336).
Homeland Security Department -- Shipping and Transportation; Technical, Organizational and Conforming Amendments2004-Sep-3004-21845By this final rule, the Coast Guard is making editorial and technical changes throughout titles 46 and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) to update and correct the titles before they are revised on October 1, 2004. Our rule updates organization names and addresses, and makes conforming amendments and technical corrections. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Homeland Security Department -- Technical Corrections to Customs and Border Protection Regulations2004-Aug-2704-19577Customs and Border Protection (CBP) periodically reviews its regulations to ensure that they are current, correct and consistent. Through this review process, CBP noted several discrepancies. This document remedies these discrepancies.
Homeland Security Department -- Alternate Hull Examinations Program for Certain Passenger Vessels, and Underwater Surveys for Nautical School, Offshore Supply, Passenger and Sailing School Vessels2004-Aug-0504-17742The Coast Guard is establishing an alternative hull examination program for certain passenger vessels, and giving nautical school, offshore supply, passenger and sailing school vessels the option of having alternating drydock examinations with underwater surveys. It is also establishing examination processes, which give industry additional latitude in scheduling inspections and will create parity between passenger vessels and all other Coast Guard-inspected vessels.
Homeland Security Department -- Review and Update of Standards for Marine Equipment2004-Jun-3004-14368The Coast Guard proposes to make certain technical amendments to its rules relating to standards for marine equipment, and to update the incorporation in those rules of references to national and international safety standards. This rulemaking is part of an ongoing effort for regulatory review and reform that increases the focus on results, decreases the focus on process, and expands compliance options for the regulated public.
Homeland Security Department -- Required Advance Electronic Presentation of Cargo Information2003-Dec-0503-29798This document amends the Customs Regulations to provide that the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CBP) must receive, by way of a CBP-approved electronic data interchange system, information pertaining to cargo before the cargo is either brought into or sent from the United States by any mode of commercial transportation (sea, air, rail or truck). The cargo information required is that which is reasonably necessary to enable high-risk shipments to be identified for purposes of ensuring cargo safety and security and preventing smuggling pursuant to the laws enforced and administered by CBP. These regulations are specifically intended to effectuate the provisions of section 343(a) of the Trade Act of 2002, as amended by the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002.
Homeland Security Department -- Vessel Security2003-Oct-2203-26347This final rule adopts, with changes, the temporary interim rule published on July 1, 2003, that provides security measures for certain vessels calling on U.S. ports. It also requires the owners or operators of vessels to designate security officers for vessels, develop security plans based on security assessments and surveys, implement security measures specific to the vessel's operation, and comply with Maritime Security Levels. This rule is one in a series of final rules on maritime security in today's Federal Register. To best understand this rule, first read the final rule titled ``Implementation of National Maritime Security Initiatives'' (USCG-2003-14792), published elsewhere in today's Federal Register.
Homeland Security Department -- Tonnage Duties-Revised Amounts2003-Aug-1303-20568This document amends the rules dealing with vessels in foreign and domestic trades by revising the amounts of tonnage duties applicable to those entering the United States from a foreign port. These revisions are necessary to reflect recent changes in the pertinent statutory provisions.
Homeland Security Department -- Required Advance Electronic Presentation of Cargo Information2003-Jul-2303-18558This document proposes to amend the Customs Regulations to provide that Customs and Border Protection (CBP) must receive, by way of a CBP-approved electronic data interchange system, information pertaining to cargo before the cargo is either brought into or sent from the United States by any mode of commercial transportation (sea, air, rail or truck). The cargo information required is that which is reasonably necessary to enable high-risk shipments to be identified so as to prevent smuggling and ensure cargo safety and security pursuant to the laws enforced and administered by CBP. The proposed regulations are specifically intended to implement the provisions of section 343(a) of the Trade Act of 2002, as amended by the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002.
Homeland Security Department -- Vessel Security2003-Jul-0103-16188This interim rule provides security measures for certain vessels calling on U.S. ports. It requires the owners or operators of vessels to designate security officers for vessels, develop security plans based on security assessments, implement security measures specific to the vessel's operation, and comply with Maritime Security Levels. This interim rule is one of six interim rules in today's Federal Register that comprise a new subchapter on the requirements for maritime security mandated by the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002. These six interim rules implement national maritime security initiatives concerning general provisions, Area Maritime Security (ports), vessels, facilities, Outer Continental Shelf facilities, and the Automatic Identification System. Where appropriate, they align these domestic maritime security requirements with those of the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code and recent amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea. To best understand these interim rules, first read the interim rule titled ``Implementation of National Maritime Security Initiatives'' (USCG-2003-14792).
Treasury Department -- General Order Warehouses2002-Nov-0802-28346This document amends the Customs Regulations principally to create a new class of bonded warehouse exclusively for the receipt of general order merchandise, and to include procedures for authorizing and operating general order warehouses. This amendment of the Customs Regulations is in response to a recent increase in the amount of unentered merchandise being moved into general order facilities. This increase has resulted from changes in the law, and it has prompted the importing community to request that Customs put in place uniform, national procedures for approving and operating warehouses receiving general order merchandise. In addition, changes are made to the Customs Regulations to implement certain amendments to the law made by the Customs modernization portion of the North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act. The amendments concern the circumstances where the title to unclaimed and abandoned merchandise vests in the Government, in lieu of sale of the merchandise at public auction.
Treasury Department -- Presentation of Vessel Cargo Declaration to Customs Before Cargo Is Laden Aboard Vessel at Foreign Port for Transport to the United States2002-Oct-3102-27661This document amends the Customs Regulations to require the advance and accurate presentation of certain manifest information prior to lading at the foreign port and to encourage the presentation of this information electronically. The document also allows a non-vessel operating common carrier (NVOCC) having an International Carrier Bond to electronically present cargo manifest information to Customs. This information is required in advance and is urgently needed in order to enable Customs to evaluate the risk of smuggling weapons of mass destruction through the use of oceangoing cargo containers before goods are loaded on vessels for importation into the United States, while, at the same time, enabling Customs to facilitate the prompt release of legitimate cargo following its arrival in the United States. Failure to provide the required information in the time period prescribed may result in the delay of a permit to unlade and/or the assessment of civil monetary penalties or claims for liquidated damages.
Transportation Department -- Shipping-Technical and Conforming Amendments2002-Sep-3002-24622This rule makes editorial and technical changes throughout Title 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations to update the title before it is recodified on October 1, 2002. It corrects addresses, updates cross-references, makes conforming amendments, and makes other technical corrections. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Transportation Department -- Liferaft Servicing Intervals2002-Sep-1702-23563The Coast Guard is amending its commercial vessel regulations to provide consistency in the requirements for servicing of inflatable liferafts and inflatable buoyant apparatus (IBA). This rule will eliminate an unnecessary burden on vessel operators and will eliminate confusion among the public and Coast Guard field personnel. The rule will defer the first servicing of a new liferaft or IBA to 2 years after initial packing on all commercial vessels not certificated under the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS).
Transportation Department -- Tank Level or Pressure Monitoring Devices2002-Sep-1702-23621In December of 2000, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled that the Coast Guard must promulgate a regulation for tank vessels to use tank level or pressure monitoring (TLPM) devices as mandated by the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA 90). The Coast Guard is implementing regulations to include minimum standards for the performance and use of TLPM devices on single-hull tank ships and single-hull tank barges carrying oil or oil residue as cargo.
Treasury Department -- Presentation of Vessel Cargo Declaration to Customs Before Cargo is Laden Aboard Vessel at Foreign Port for Transport to the United States2002-Aug-0802-20147This document proposes to amend the Customs Regulations to require the advance and accurate presentation of manifest information prior to lading at the foreign port and to encourage the electronic presentation of such information in advance. The document also proposes to allow a non-vessel operating common carrier (NVOCC) having an International Carrier Bond to electronically present this cargo manifest information to Customs. This information is required in advance and is urgently needed in order to enable Customs to evaluate the risk of smuggling before goods are loaded on vessels for importation into the United States, including the risk of smuggling of weapons of mass destruction through the use of oceangoing cargo containers, while, at the same time, enabling Customs to facilitate the prompt release of legitimate cargo following its arrival in the United States. Failure to provide the required information in the time period prescribed may result in the assessment of civil monetary penalties or claims for liquidated damages.
Transportation Department -- Navigation and Navigable Waters-Technical Amendments, Organizational Changes, Miscellaneous Editorial Changes and Conforming Amendments2002-Jun-1802-15229This rule makes editorial and technical changes throughout title 33 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) to update the title before it is recodified on July 1, 2002. It updates organization names and addresses, and makes conforming amendments and technical corrections. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Transportation Department -- Safety of Uninspected Passenger Vessels Under the Passenger Vessel Safety Act of 1993 (PVSA)2002-May-1502-11060The Coast Guard establishes this final rule to implement safety measures for uninspected passenger vessels under the Passenger Vessel Safety Act of 1993 (PVSA). This Act authorizes the Coast Guard to amend operating and equipment guidelines for uninspected passenger vessels over 100 gross tons, carrying 12 or fewer passengers for hire. These regulations will implement this new class of uninspected passenger vessel, provide for the issuance of special permits to uninspected vessels participating in a Marine Event of National Significance (e.g., OPSAIL 2000 and Tall Ships 2000), and develop specific manning, structural fire protection, operating, and equipment requirements for a limited fleet of PVSA-exempted vessels.
Transportation Department -- Alternate Hull Examination Program for Certain Passenger Vessels, and Underwater Surveys for Nautical School, Offshore Supply, Passenger and Sailing School Vessels Coast Guard2002-Apr-2902-9832The Coast Guard is establishing an alternative hull examination program for certain passenger vessels. This rule establishes the option of alternating drydock examinations with underwater surveys for nautical school, offshore supply, passenger and sailing school vessels. This rule also establishes an examination process that gives industry additional latitude in scheduling inspections and will create parity between passenger vessels and all other Coast Guard-inspected vessels. We expect this rule to result in a reduction of time and paperwork associated with Coast Guard vessel inspections and examinations.
Transportation Department -- Liferaft Servicing Intervals2002-Mar-0502-5211The Coast Guard proposes to amend its commercial vessel regulations to provide consistency in the requirements for servicing of inflatable liferafts and inflatable buoyant apparatus (IBA). We are proposing this rule to eliminate an unnecessary burden on vessel operators and to eliminate confusion among the public and Coast Guard field personnel. The proposed rule would defer the first servicing of a new liferaft or IBA to two years after initial packing on all commercial vessels not certificated under the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS).
Transportation Department -- Pollution Prevention for Oceangoing Ships and Certain Vessels in Domestic Service2001-Nov-0201-27256The Coast Guard amends regulations for pollution prevention from ships to align domestic requirements with international maritime pollution standards. This rule changes regulations concerning: oily- water separators, operational discharges of oil, damage and intact stability of tank vessels, period of validity for an International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate, and garbage recordkeeping requirements. To provide consistency with industry standards and clarify U.S. oil regulations, we are also amending oily mixture discharge shore connection requirements for certain vessels and redefining certain terms dealing with oil.
Transportation Department -- Tank Level or Pressure Monitoring Devices2001-Oct-0101-24493In December of 2000, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled that the Coast Guard must promulgate a regulation for tank vessels to use tank level or pressure monitoring (TLPM) devices as mandated by the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA 90). We are of the opinion that these regulations must apply in some manner to single-hull tank vessels. Within this notice of proposed rulemaking, we present eight proposed regulatory options and regulatory text for each option regarding minimum standards for the performance and use of these devices on single-hull tank ships and single-hull tank barges carrying oil as cargo. Due to the extreme variance in impact to the classes of tank vessels subject to this proposed rule, and, taking into account the cost-effectiveness ratio relative to the other significant OPA 90 regulations, we are also soliciting comments on financial, energy, safety, and environmental considerations. The Coast Guard is seeking information from commenters in order to select the best alternative for the final rule. In accordance with the Administrative Procedure Act, once we receive and evaluate the public comments from this notice, we intend to implement this statutory mandate through some form of these proposed regulations as the final rule. However, in view of the cost-effectiveness ratios of the alternatives, as well as the numerous requirements throughout OPA 90 to report back to Congress on the impacts of this legislation, Coast Guard will share with Congress any information provided by the public that addresses the reasonableness of implementing the statute.
Transportation Department -- Technical Amendments; Organizational Changes; Miscellaneous Editorial Changes; and Conforming Amendments2001-Sep-2101-23554This rule makes editorial and technical changes throughout Title 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations to update the title before it is recodified on October 1, 2001. It corrects addresses, updates cross-references, makes conforming amendments, and makes other technical corrections. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Treasury Department -- User and Navigation Fees; Other Reimbursement Charges2001-May-0101-10718This document proposes to amend the Customs Regulations regarding the proper assessment of user and navigation fees, as well as other reimbursement charges for Customs services performed in connection with, among other things, the processing of vehicles, vessels, aircraft and merchandise arriving in the United States. It is believed that the proposed amendments would conform the regulations with the intent of the Customs user fee statute. The proposed amendments also reflect existing operational policy and administrative practice in this area.
Transportation Department -- Cargo Securing on Vessels Operating in U.S. Waters2000-Dec-0100-30447The Coast Guard is proposing regulations to implement cargo securing standards for U.S. and foreign vessels, carrying general cargoes and hazardous materials on international voyages, to parallel the new requirements in Chapter VI and VII of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS). The Coast Guard is also seeking comments on five options for the future development of cargo-securing regulations for U.S.-certificated vessels carrying hazardous materials in domestic coastwise trade.
Transportation Department -- Noxious Liquid Substances, Obsolete Hazardous Materials in Bulk, and Current Hazardous Materials in Bulk2000-Nov-0800-28387The Coast Guard revises its rules on carriage of hazardous materials in bulk, treating the rules in three parts. This three-part revision will update the tables of hazardous materials transportable in bulk and better inform persons shipping any such materials of those materials' compatibility and of requirements for special handling. It should make the carriage of such materials safer.
Transportation Department -- Technical Amendments; Organizational Changes; Miscellaneous Editorial Changes and Conforming Amendments2000-Sep-2900-24598This rule makes editorial and technical changes throughout title 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) to update the title before it is recodified on October 1, 2000. It corrects addresses, updates cross-references, makes conforming amendments, and makes other technical corrections. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Transportation Department -- Pollution Prevention for Oceangoing Ships and Certain Vessels in Domestic Service2000-Aug-0800-19219The Coast Guard proposes amending U.S. regulations for pollution prevention from ships. To align with international standards, we propose amending the domestic regulations concerning oily-water separators, operational discharges of oil, damage and intact stability of tank vessels, International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificates, garbage recordkeeping requirements, and placards for reception facilities. To provide consistency with industry standards and clarification in U.S. oil regulations, we propose changing oily mixture discharge shore connection requirements for certain vessels and redefining certain terms dealing with oil.
Treasury Department -- General Order Warehouses2000-Jul-1200-17639This document proposes to amend the Customs Regulations principally to create a new class of bonded warehouse exclusively for the receipt of general order merchandise, and to include procedures for authorizing and operating general order warehouses. This proposal is in response to a recent increase in the amount of unentered merchandise being moved into general order facilities. This increase has resulted from changes in the law, and it has prompted the importing community to request that Customs put in place uniform, national procedures for approving and operating warehouses receiving general order merchandise. In addition, changes are proposed to the Customs Regulations to implement certain amendments to the law made by the Customs modernization portion of the North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act. The amendments concern the circumstances where the title to unclaimed and abandoned merchandise vests in the Government, in lieu of sale of the merchandise at public auction.
Transportation Department -- Technical Amendments; Organizational Changes; Miscellaneous Editorial Changes and Conforming Amendments2000-Jun-2900-16078This rule makes editorial and technical changes throughout Title 33 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) to update the title before it is recodified on July 1, 2000. It corrects addresses, updates cross-references, makes conforming amendments, and makes other technical corrections. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public.
Transportation Department -- Oil Pollution Act of 1990 Phase-out Requirements for Single Hull Tank Vessels2000-Jun-2300-15955The Coast Guard clarifies the regulations for determining phase-out dates for single hull tank vessels under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA 90). This rule codifies our policy published on April 21, 1999, that states that conversion of a single hull tank vessel to add only double sides or only a double bottom after August 18, 1990, will not change the vessel's scheduled phase-out date under OPA 90.
Treasury Department -- Technical Corrections Relating to Customs Forms2000-Mar-2900-7557This document amends the Customs Regulations by correcting references to certain Customs Forms that have either been eliminated, substantially revised, or consolidated with another Customs Form. These corrections are made to update the Customs Regulations so that the trade community and vessel operators can be aware of current Customs information requirements.
Transportation Department -- Safety of Uninspected Passenger Vessels Under the Passenger Vessel Safety Act of 1993 (PVSA)2000-Mar-0200-4777The Coast Guard proposes regulations that implement safety measures for uninspected passenger vessels under the Passenger Vessel Safety Act of 1993 (PVSA). This Act authorizes the Coast Guard to amend operating and equipment guidelines for uninspected passenger vessels over 100 gross tons, carrying 12 or less passengers for hire. These regulations will implement this new class of uninspected passenger vessel, provide for the issuance of special permits to uninspected vessels, and develop specific manning, structural fire protection, operating, and equipment requirements for a limited fleet of PVSA exempted vessels.
Transportation Department -- Oil Pollution Act of 1990 Phase-out Requirements for Single Hull Tank Vessels2000-Jan-1800-1028The Coast Guard proposes to clarify our regulations for determining phase-out dates for single hull tank vessels under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA 90). This proposed rule would codify our policy published on April 21, 1999, that states that conversion of a single hull tank vessel to add only double sides or only a double bottom after August 18, 1990, will not change the vessel's scheduled phase-out date under OPA 90.
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