Cancer

cancer
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
Labor Department -- Occupational Exposure to Beryllium and Beryllium Compounds in Construction and Shipyard Sectors2017-Jun-272017-12871The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) proposes to revoke the ancillary provisions for the construction and the shipyard sectors that OSHA adopted on January 9, 2017 but retain the new lower permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 0.2 [mu]g/m\3\ and the short term exposure limit (STEL) of 2.0 [mu]g/m\3\ for each sector. OSHA will not enforce the January 9, 2017 shipyard and construction standards without further notice while this new rulemaking is underway. This proposal does not affect the general industry beryllium standard published on January 9, 2017.
Labor Department -- Occupational Exposure to Beryllium2017-Jan-092016-30409The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is amending its existing standards for occupational exposure to beryllium and beryllium compounds. OSHA has determined that employees exposed to beryllium at the previous permissible exposure limits face a significant risk of material impairment to their health. The evidence in the record for this rulemaking indicates that workers exposed to beryllium are at increased risk of developing chronic beryllium disease and lung cancer. This final rule establishes new permissible exposure limits of 0.2 micrograms of beryllium per cubic meter of air (0.2 [mu]g/m\3\) as an 8-hour time-weighted average and 2.0 [mu]g/m\3\ as a short-term exposure limit determined over a sampling period of 15 minutes. It also includes other provisions to protect employees, such as requirements for exposure assessment, methods for controlling exposure, respiratory protection, personal protective clothing and equipment, housekeeping, medical surveillance, hazard communication, and recordkeeping. OSHA is issuing three separate standards--for general industry, for shipyards, and for construction--in order to tailor requirements to the circumstances found in these sectors.
Labor Department -- Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica; Correction2016-Sep-012016-20442OSHA published a final rule on occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica on March 25, 2016 which became effective on June 23, 2016. This document corrects typographical errors in the final rule by revising these sections.
Labor Department -- Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica2016-Mar-252016-04800The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is amending its existing standards for occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica. OSHA has determined that employees exposed to respirable crystalline silica at the previous permissible exposure limits face a significant risk of material impairment to their health. The evidence in the record for this rulemaking indicates that workers exposed to respirable crystalline silica are at increased risk of developing silicosis and other non-malignant respiratory diseases, lung cancer, and kidney disease. This final rule establishes a new permissible exposure limit of 50 micrograms of respirable crystalline silica per cubic meter of air (50 [mu]g/m\3\) as an 8-hour time- weighted average in all industries covered by the rule. It also includes other provisions to protect employees, such as requirements for exposure assessment, methods for controlling exposure, respiratory protection, medical surveillance, hazard communication, and recordkeeping. OSHA is issuing two separate standards--one for general industry and maritime, and the other for construction--in order to tailor requirements to the circumstances found in these sectors.
Labor Department -- Claims for Compensation Under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act2015-Nov-182015-27121This document contains the changes to the regulations governing the administration of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000, as amended (EEOICPA or Act), being proposed by the Department of Labor (Department or DOL). Part B of the Act provides uniform lump-sum payments and medical benefits to covered employees and, where applicable, to survivors of such employees, of the Department of Energy (DOE), its predecessor agencies and certain of its vendors, contractors and subcontractors. Part B of the Act also provides smaller uniform lump-sum payments and medical benefits to individuals found eligible by the Department of Justice (DOJ) for benefits under section 5 of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) and, where applicable, to their survivors. Part E of the Act provides variable lump-sum payments (based on a worker's permanent impairment and/or qualifying calendar years of established wage-loss) and medical benefits for covered DOE contractor employees and, where applicable, provides variable lump-sum payments to survivors of such employees (based on a worker's death due to a covered illness and any qualifying calendar years of established wage-loss). Part E of the Act also provides these same payments and benefits to uranium miners, millers and ore transporters covered by section 5 of RECA and, where applicable, to survivors of such employees. The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) administers the adjudication of claims and the payment of benefits under EEOICPA, with National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) estimating the amounts of radiation received by employees alleged to have sustained cancer as a result of such exposure and establishing guidelines to be followed by OWCP in determining whether such cancers are at least as likely as not related to employment. Both DOE and DOJ are responsible for notifying potential claimants and for submitting evidence necessary for OWCP's adjudication of claims under EEOICPA.
Health and Human Services Department -- Current Good Manufacturing Practice, Hazard Analysis, and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Food for Animals2015-Sep-172015-21921The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is adding regulations for the Current Good Manufacturing Practice, Hazard Analysis, and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Food for Animals. These regulations will, for the first time, establish requirements for the current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) for food for animals. In addition, we are adding requirements for certain domestic and foreign animal food facilities to establish and implement hazard analysis and risk-based preventive controls for food for animals. We are taking this action to provide greater assurance that animal food is safe and will not cause illness or injury to humans and animals and to implement new statutory provisions in the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). The rule is intended to build an animal food safety system for the future that makes modern science- and risk-based preventive controls the norm across all sectors of the animal food system.
Labor Department -- Occupational Exposure to Beryllium and Beryllium Compounds2015-Aug-072015-17596The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) proposes to amend its existing exposure limits for occupational exposure in general industry to beryllium and beryllium compounds and promulgate a substance-specific standard for general industry regulating occupational exposure to beryllium and beryllium compounds. This document proposes a new permissible exposure limit (PEL), as well as ancillary provisions for employee protection such as methods for controlling exposure, respiratory protection, medical surveillance, hazard communication, and recordkeeping. In addition, OSHA seeks comment on a number of alternatives, including a lower PEL, that could affect construction and maritime, as well as general industry.
Health and Human Services Department -- World Trade Center Health Program; Amendments to List of WTC-Related Health Conditions; Cancer; Revision2014-Feb-182014-03370On September 12, 2012, the Administrator of the WTC Health Program (Administrator) published a final rule in the Federal Register adding certain types of cancer to the List of World Trade Center (WTC)- Related Health Conditions (List) in the WTC Health Program regulations; an additional final rule was published on September 19, 2013 adding prostate cancer to the List. Through the process of implementing the addition of cancers to the List and integrating cancer coverage into the WTC Health Program, the Administrator has identified the need to amend the rule to remove the ICD codes and specific cancer sub-sites, clarify the definition of ``childhood cancers,'' revise the definition of ``rare cancers,'' and notify stakeholders that the Administrator is revising WTC Health Program policy related to coverage of cancers of the brain and the pancreas. No types of cancer covered by the WTC Health Program will be removed by this action; four types of cancer-- malignant neoplasms of the brain, the cervix uteri, the pancreas, and the testis--are newly eligible for certification as WTC-related health conditions as a result of this action.
Health and Human Services Department -- Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Food for Animals2013-Oct-292013-25126The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing regulations for domestic and foreign facilities that are required to register under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) to establish requirements for current good manufacturing practice in manufacturing, processing, packing, and holding of animal food. FDA also is proposing regulations to require that certain facilities establish and implement hazard analysis and risk-based preventive controls for food for animals. FDA is taking this action to provide greater assurance that animal food is safe and will not cause illness or injury to animals or humans and is intended to build an animal food safety system for the future that makes modern, science and risk-based preventive controls the norm across all sectors of the animal food system.
Health and Human Services Department -- World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Prostate Cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions2013-Sep-192013-22800On May 2, 2013, the Administrator of the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program received a petition (Petition 002) requesting the addition of prostate cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions (List) covered in the WTC Health Program. In this final rule, the Administrator adds malignant neoplasm of the prostate (prostate cancer) to the List in the WTC Health Program regulations.
Labor Department -- Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica2013-Sep-122013-20997The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) proposes to amend its existing standards for occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica. The basis for issuance of this proposal is a preliminary determination by the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health that employees exposed to respirable crystalline silica face a significant risk to their health at the current permissible exposure limits and that promulgating these proposed standards will substantially reduce that risk. This document proposes a new permissible exposure limit, calculated as an 8-hour time-weighted average, of 50 micrograms of respirable crystalline silica per cubic meter of air (50 [mu]g/m\3\). OSHA also proposes other ancillary provisions for employee protection such as preferred methods for controlling exposure, respiratory protection, medical surveillance, hazard communication, and recordkeeping. OSHA is proposing two separate regulatory texts--one for general industry and maritime, and the other for construction--in order to tailor requirements to the circumstances found in these sectors.
Health and Human Services Department -- Animal Feeds Contaminated With Salmonella Microorganisms2013-Jul-162013-16971The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) is revoking an advisory opinion on animal feeds contaminated with Salmonella microorganisms. This action is being taken because that advisory opinion is being superseded by the current FDA enforcement strategy articulated in a final compliance policy guide (CPG) on Salmonella in food for animals.
Health and Human Services Department -- World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Prostate Cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions2013-Jul-022013-15816On May 2, 2013, the Administrator of the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program received a petition (Petition 002) requesting the addition of prostate cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions (List) covered in the WTC Health Program. The Administrator has determined to publish a proposed rule adding malignant neoplasm of the prostate (prostate cancer) to the List in the WTC Health Program regulations.
Health and Human Services Department -- New Animal Drugs; Updating Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs in Food2012-Dec-052012-29322The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to revise the animal drug regulations regarding tolerances for residues of approved and conditionally approved new animal drugs in food by standardizing, simplifying, and clarifying the determination standards and codification style. In addition, we are proposing to add definitions for key terms. The purpose of the revision is to enhance understanding of tolerance determination and improve the readability of the regulations.
Health and Human Services Department -- World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Certain Types of Cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions2012-Sep-122012-22304Title I of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 amended the Public Health Service Act (PHS Act) to establish the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program. The WTC Health Program, which is administered by the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), provides medical monitoring and treatment to eligible firefighters and related personnel, law enforcement officers, and rescue, recovery, and cleanup workers who responded to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in New York City, at the Pentagon, and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and to eligible survivors of the New York City attacks. In accordance with WTC Health Program regulations, which establish procedures for adding a new condition to the list of covered health conditions, this final rule adds to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions the types of cancer proposed for inclusion by the notice of proposed rulemaking.
Health and Human Services Department -- Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Regulation of Carcinogenic Compounds in Food-Producing Animals2012-Aug-222012-20609The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations regarding compounds of carcinogenic concern used in food- producing animals. Specifically, the Agency is clarifying the definition of ``S<INF>o</INF>'' and revising the definition of ``S<INF>m</INF>'' so that it conforms to the clarified definition of S<INF>o</INF>. Other clarifying and conforming changes are also being made.
Health and Human Services Department -- World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Certain Types of Cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions2012-Jun-132012-14203Title I of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 amended the Public Health Service Act (PHS Act) to establish the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program. The WTC Health Program, which is administered by the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), provides medical monitoring and treatment to eligible firefighters and related personnel, law enforcement officers, and rescue, recovery, and cleanup workers who responded to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in New York City, at the Pentagon, and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and to eligible survivors of the New York City attacks. In accordance with our regulations, which establish procedures for adding a new condition to the list of health conditions covered by the WTC Health Program, this proposed rule would add certain types of cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions.
Health and Human Services Department -- Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; N-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidone; Correction2012-Feb-172012-3747The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a document in the Federal Register of November 25, 2011 (76 FR 72617), codifying a method of detection for residues of n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone in edible tissues of cattle. That document contained a universal resource locator (URL) linking to the Agency's Web site that did not reflect the most recent URL.
Health and Human Services Department -- Guidelines for Determining Probability of Causation Under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000; Revision of Guidelines on Non-Radiogenic Cancers2012-Feb-062012-2527In a notice of proposed rulemaking published in the Federal Register on March 21, 2011, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) proposed to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) as a radiogenic cancer under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (EEOICPA) (76 FR 15268). Under this final rule, CLL will be treated as being potentially caused by radiation and hence as potentially compensable under EEOICPA. HHS reverses its decision to exclude CLL from such treatment.
Health and Human Services Department -- Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Eprinomectin; N-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidone2011-Nov-252011-30329The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect approval of an original new animal drug application (NADA) filed by Merial Ltd. The NADA provides for the veterinary prescription use of eprinomectin by injection for the treatment and control of internal and external parasites of cattle on pasture with persistent effectiveness. The current tolerance for the marker residue for total residues of eprinomectin in edible tissues of cattle is being lowered. The method of detection for residues of the carcinogenic excipient n-methyl-2- pyrrolidone (NMP) in edible tissues of cattle is also being codified.
Health and Human Services Department -- Guidelines for Determining Probability of Causation Under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000; Revision of Guidelines on Non-Radiogenic Cancers2011-Mar-212011-6329The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is proposing to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) as a radiogenic cancer under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (EEOICPA). Under current guidelines HHS promulgated as regulations in 2002, all types of cancers except for CLL are treated as being potentially caused by radiation and hence as potentially compensable under EEOICPA. HHS proposes to reverse its decision to exclude CLL from such treatment.
Health and Human Services Department -- Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Regulation of Carcinogenic Compounds in Food-Producing Animals2010-Dec-202010-31887The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to amend its regulations regarding compounds of carcinogenic concern used in food-producing animals. Specifically, the Agency is clarifying the definition of ``S<INF>o</INF>'' and revising the definition of ``S<INF>m</INF>'' so that it conforms to the clarified definition of S<INF>o</INF>. Other clarifying and conforming changes are also being made.
Justice Department -- Radiation Exposure Compensation Act: Allowance for Costs and Expenses2010-Aug-102010-19633By this rule the Department of Justice (``the Department'') amends its existing regulations implementing the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (``RECA'' or ``the Act'') to conform to the decision of the Tenth Circuit in the case of Hackwell v. United States, 491 F.3d 1229, 1241 (10th Cir. 2007). The Tenth Circuit held that the plain meaning of ``services rendered'' in section 9(a) of the Act revealed Congress' unambiguous intent to exclude ``costs incurred'' from the attorney fee limitation. Consequently, the court invalidated 28 CFR 79.74(b) as ``contrary to the RECA's plain language.'' Accordingly, the Department is amending its regulation at Sec. 79.74(b) to strike the language ``including costs incurred'' from the agency's limitation on payments to attorneys representing claimants under RECA.
Health and Human Services Department -- Index of Legally Marketed Unapproved New Animal Drugs for Minor Species2007-Dec-067-23580The Minor Use and Minor Species Animal Health Act of 2004 (MUMS act) amended the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) to authorize the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA, the agency) to establish new regulatory procedures that provide incentives intended to make more drugs legally available to veterinarians and animal owners for the treatment of minor animal species and uncommon diseases in major animal species. At this time, FDA is issuing final regulations to implement section 572 of the act entitled ``Index of Legally Marketed Unapproved New Animal Drugs for Minor Species.'' These regulations establish administrative procedures and criteria for index listing a new animal drug for use in a minor species. Such indexing provides a basis for legally marketing an unapproved new animal drug intended for use in a minor species.
Health and Human Services Department -- Use of Materials Derived from Cattle in Medical Products Intended for Use in Humans and Drugs Intended for Use in Ruminants2007-Jan-126-22329The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to prohibit the use of certain cattle material in, or in the manufacture (including processing) of, drugs, biologics, and medical devices intended for use in humans and human cells, tissues, and cellular and tissue-based products (HCT/Ps) (collectively, medical products for humans), and in drugs intended for use in ruminant animals (drugs for ruminants). FDA is also proposing new recordkeeping requirements for medical products for humans and drugs for ruminants that are manufactured from or otherwise contain material from cattle. FDA is proposing these actions as part of its continuing efforts to strengthen defenses against the potential risk of exposure to, and spread of, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and related human disease in the United States.
Labor Department -- Performance of Functions; Claims for Compensation Under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000, as Amended2006-Dec-296-21839On June 8, 2005, the Department of Labor (DOL) published interim final regulations that govern its responsibilities under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000, as amended (EEOICPA or Act). Part B of the Act provides lump-sum payments of $150,000 and medical benefits to covered employees and, where applicable, to survivors of such employees, of the Department of Energy (DOE), its predecessor agencies and certain of its vendors, contractors and subcontractors. Part B also provides lump-sum payments of $50,000 and medical benefits to individuals found eligible by the Department of Justice (DOJ) for $100,000 under section 5 of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) and, where applicable, to their survivors. Part E of the Act provides variable lump-sum payments (based on a worker's permanent impairment and/or calendar years of qualifying wage-loss) and medical benefits for covered DOE contractor employees and, where applicable, provides variable lump-sum payments to survivors of such employees (based on a worker's death due to a covered illness and any calendar years of qualifying wage-loss). Part E also provides these same payments and benefits to uranium miners, millers and ore transporters covered by section 5 of RECA and, where applicable, to survivors of such employees. At the same time the Department published the interim final regulations, it also invited written comments and advice from interested parties regarding possible changes to those regulations. This document amends the interim final regulations based on comments that the Department received.
Labor Department -- Occupational Exposure to Hexavalent Chromium2006-Oct-3006-8971The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is making a minor amendment to its final rule governing occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium in general industry, which was promulgated on February 28, 2006. This amendment implements a settlement agreement (Agreement) entered into among OSHA, the Surface Finishing Industry Council (SFIC), Public Citizen Health Research Group (HRG), and the United Steel, Paper and Forestry, Rubber, Manufacturing, Energy, Allied Industrial and Service Workers International Union (Steelworkers) on October 25, 2006, to resolve SFIC's legal challenge to the standard.
Labor Department -- Occupational Exposure to Hexavalent Chromium2006-Feb-2806-1589The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is amending the existing standard which limits occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). OSHA has determined based upon the best evidence currently available that at the current permissible exposure limit (PEL) for Cr(VI), workers face a significant risk to material impairment of their health. The evidence in the record for this rulemaking indicates that workers exposed to Cr(VI) are at an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The record also indicates that occupational exposure to Cr(VI) may result in asthma, and damage to the nasal epithelia and skin. The final rule establishes an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) exposure limit of 5 micrograms of Cr(VI) per cubic meter of air (5 [mu]g/m\3\). This is a considerable reduction from the previous PEL of 1 milligram per 10 cubic meters of air (1 mg/10 m\3\, or 100 [mu]g/ m\3\) reported as CrO<INF>3</INF>, which is equivalent to a limit of 52 [mu]g/m\3\ as Cr(VI). The final rule also contains ancillary provisions for worker protection such as requirements for exposure determination, preferred exposure control methods, including a compliance alternative for a small sector for which the new PEL is infeasible, respiratory protection, protective clothing and equipment, hygiene areas and practices, medical surveillance, recordkeeping, and start-up dates that include four years for the implementation of engineering controls to meet the PEL. The final standard separately regulates general industry, construction, and shipyards in order to tailor requirements to the unique circumstances found in each of these sectors. The PEL established by this rule reduces the significant risk posed to workers by occupational exposure to Cr(VI) to the maximum extent that is technologically and economically feasible.
Labor Department -- Performance of Functions; Claims for Compensation Under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act2005-Jun-0805-10936This document contains the interim final regulations governing the administration of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000, as amended (EEOICPA or Act) by the Department of Labor (Department or DOL). Part B of the Act provides uniform lump-sum payments and medical benefits to covered employees and, where applicable, to survivors of such employees, of the Department of Energy (DOE), its predecessor agencies and certain of its vendors, contractors and subcontractors. Part B of the Act also provides smaller uniform lump-sum payments and medical benefits to individuals found eligible by the Department of Justice (DOJ) for benefits under section 5 of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) and, where applicable, to their survivors. Part E of the Act provides variable lump-sum payments (based on a worker's permanent impairment and/or years of established wage-loss) and medical benefits for covered DOE contractor employees and, where applicable, provides variable lump-sum payments to survivors of such employees (based on a worker's death due to a covered illness and any years of established wage-loss). Part E of the Act also provides these same payments and benefits to uranium miners, millers and ore transporters covered by section 5 of the RECA and, where applicable, to survivors of such employees. The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) administers the adjudication of claims and the payment of benefits under EEOICPA, with the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) estimating the amounts of radiation received by employees alleged to have sustained cancer as a result of such exposure and establishing guidelines to be followed by OWCP in determining whether such cancers are at least as likely as not related to employment. Both DOE and DOJ are responsible for notifying potential claimants and for submitting evidence necessary for OWCP's adjudication of claims under EEOICPA.
Labor Department -- Occupational Exposure to Hexavalent Chromium2004-Oct-0404-21488The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) proposes to amend its existing standard for employee exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). The basis for issuance of this proposal is a preliminary determination by the Assistant Secretary that employees exposed to Cr(VI) face a significant risk to their health at the current permissible exposure limit and that promulgating this proposed standard will substantially reduce that risk. The information gathered so far in this rulemaking indicates that employees exposed to Cr(VI) well below the current permissible exposure limit are at increased risk of developing lung cancer. Occupational exposures to Cr(VI) may also result in asthma, and damage to the nasal epithelia and skin. This document proposes an 8-hour time-weighted average permissible exposure limit of one microgram of Cr(VI) per cubic meter of air (1 mg/ m<SUP>3</SUP>) for all Cr(VI) compounds. OSHA also proposes other ancillary provisions for employee protection such as preferred methods for controlling exposure, respiratory protection, protective work clothing and equipment, hygiene areas and practices, medical surveillance, hazard communication, and recordkeeping. OSHA is proposing separate regulatory texts for general industry, construction, and shipyards in order to tailor requirements to the circumstances found in each of these sectors.
Justice Department -- Civil Division; Claims Under the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act Amendments of 2000; Amendments Contained in the 21st Century Department of Justice Appropriations Authorization Act of 20022004-Mar-2304-5732The Department of Justice (``the Department'') revises its existing regulations implementing the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (``the Act'' or ``RECA''), to reflect changes to RECA contained in two legislative enactments: the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act Amendments of 2000 (``2000 Amendments''), enacted on July 10, 2000; and the 21st Century Department of Justice Appropriations Authorization Act (``Appropriations Authorization Act''), enacted on November 2, 2002. After enactment of the 2000 Amendments, the Department published two related rulemakings in the Federal Register to implement the legislation. The first, a final rule published on August 7, 2002, reflected technical changes to the Act made by the 2000 Amendments. The second, also published on August 7, 2002, was a proposed rule implementing those changes in the 2000 Amendments that required public notice and comment. Since publication of these two rulemakings, the Appropriations Authorization Act was passed; that legislation required modification to both the final and proposed rules. Therefore, this rulemaking accomplishes two essential tasks: discusses comments received regarding the ``proposed'' rule and reflects relevant changes made by the Department in connection with those comments; and incorporates technical revisions to the rule in order to implement the Appropriations Authorization Act.
Labor Department -- Performance of Functions Under This Chapter; Claims for Compensation Under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000, as Amended2002-Dec-2602-31841On May 25, 2001, the Department of Labor (DOL) published interim final regulations that governed its responsibilities under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000, as amended (EEOICPA or Act). The Act provides lump-sum payments and medical benefits to covered employees and, where applicable, to survivors of such employees, of the Department of Energy (DOE), its predecessor agencies and certain of its vendors, contractors and subcontractors. The Act also provides smaller lump-sum payments and medical benefits to individuals found to be eligible for an award under section 5 of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act, as amended (RECA), and where applicable, to their survivors. At the same time the Department published the interim final regulations, it also invited written comments and advice from interested parties regarding possible changes to those regulations. This document amends the interim final regulations based on comments that the Department received, and also includes changes necessary to conform the regulations to several technical amendments to the EEOICPA that Congress enacted after the interim final regulations were published.
Justice Department -- Claims Under the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act Amendments of 2000; Expansion of Coverage to Uranium Millers and Ore Transporters; Expansion of Coverage for Uranium Miners; Representation and Fees2002-Aug-0702-19222The Department of Justice (``the Department'') proposes to amend its existing regulations implementing the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (``the Act'') to reflect amendments to the Act made in the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act Amendments of 2000 (``2000 Amendments''), enacted on July 10, 2000. This is the second of two related rulemakings and is a proposed rule. The related rulemaking is a final rule published elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register. This proposed rule describes the expanded population of eligible uranium mine workers created by lowering the radiation exposure threshold for miners; identifies the new uranium mining states with respect to which miners may be eligible for compensation; includes provision for compensation to ``aboveground'' miners; sets forth employment eligibility criteria for the new claimant categories; describes the documentation that would be required to establish proof of employment in a uranium mine or mill or as an ore transporter; describes the medical documentation necessary to establish the existence of renal cancer and chronic renal disease; and revises the provision concerning representation of claimants before the Department of Justice with respect to claims brought under the Act.
Justice Department -- Claims Under the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act Amendments of 2000; Technical Amendments2002-Aug-0702-19221The Department of Justice (``the Department'') revises its existing regulations to implement the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (``the Act,'' or ``RECA''), to reflect amendments to the Act made in the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act Amendments of 2000 (``2000 Amendments''), enacted on July 10, 2000. This is the first of two related rulemakings and is a final rule, technical in nature, providing conforming amendments consistent with the new law. These revisions reflect only those changes specifically set forth in the statute, and other technical amendments. The second related rulemaking is a proposed rule published elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register. The final regulations: expand the list of radiogenic and chronic diseases that are compensable for ``downwinder'' and ``onsite participant'' claimants; eliminate smoking distinctions for all claimants; amend the list of geographical areas to provide additional radiation-affected areas for ``downwinder'' claimants; modify the burden of proof for purposes of claims processing; allow claimants who have previously been denied compensation to file up to three times; and make other technical revisions consistent with the amended Act.
Health and Human Services Department -- Methods for Radiation Dose Reconstruction Under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000; Final Rule2002-May-0202-10763This rule implements select provisions of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (``EEOICPA'' or ``Act''). The Act requires the promulgation of methods, in the form of regulations, for estimating the dose levels of ionizing radiation incurred by workers in the performance of duty for nuclear weapons production programs of the Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies. These ``dose reconstruction'' methods will be applied by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, which is responsible for producing the radiation dose estimates that the U.S. Department of Labor will use in adjudicating certain cancer claims under the Act.
Health and Human Services Department -- Guidelines for Determining the Probability of Causation Under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000; Final Rule2002-May-0202-10764This rule implements select provisions of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (``EEOICPA'' or ``Act''). The Act requires the promulgation of guidelines, in the form of regulations, for determining whether an individual with cancer shall be found, ``at least as likely as not,'' to have sustained that cancer from exposure to ionizing radiation in the performance of duty for nuclear weapons production programs of the Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies. The guidelines will be applied by the U.S. Department of Labor, which is responsible for determining whether to award compensation to individuals seeking federal compensation under the Act.
Health and Human Services Department -- Methods for Radiation Dose Reconstruction Under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000; Interim Final Rule With Request for Comments2001-Oct-0501-24879This rule implements select provisions of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (``EEOICPA'' or ``Act''). The Act requires the promulgation of methods, in the form of regulations, for estimating the dose levels of ionizing radiation incurred by workers in the performance of duty for nuclear weapons production programs of the Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies. These ``dose reconstruction'' methods will be applied by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, which is responsible for producing the radiation dose estimates that the U.S. Department of Labor will use in adjudicating certain cancer claims under the Act.
Health and Human Services Department -- Guidelines for Determining the Probability of Causation Under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking2001-Oct-0501-24878This proposal would implement select provisions of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (``EEOICPA'' or ``Act''). The Act requires the promulgation of guidelines, in the form of regulations, for determining whether an individual with cancer shall be found, ``at least as likely as not,'' to have sustained that cancer from exposure to ionizing radiation in the performance of duty for nuclear weapons production programs of the Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies. The guidelines will be applied by the U.S. Department of Labor, which is responsible for determining whether to award compensation to individuals seeking federal compensation under the Act.
Labor Department -- Performance of Functions Under This Chapter; Claims for Compensation Under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act2001-May-2501-13113This document contains the interim final regulations governing the administration of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA or Act), that provides lump-sum payments and medical benefits to covered employees and, where applicable, survivors of such employees, of the Department of Energy (DOE), its predecessor agencies and certain of its vendors, contractors and subcontractors. The Act also provides for the payment of smaller lump-sum payments and medical benefits to individuals already found eligible for benefits under section 5 of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act and, where applicable, their survivors. The Department of Labor's (DOL) Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) administers the adjudication of claims and payment of benefits under the EEOICPA, with the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) calculating the amounts of radiation received by employees alleged to have sustained cancer as a result of such exposure and establishing guidelines to be followed in determining whether such cancers are at least as likely as not related to employment. The Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of Justice (DOJ) are responsible for notifying potential claimants and submitting evidence necessary for DOL's adjudication of claims under the EEOICPA.
Health and Human Services Department -- Administrative Practices and Procedures; Good Guidance Practices2000-Sep-1900-23887The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its administrative regulations to codify its policies and procedures for the development, issuance, and use of guidance documents. This action is necessary to comply with requirements of the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). The Modernization Act codified certain parts of the agency's current ``Good Guidance Practices'' (GGP's) and directed the agency to issue a regulation consistent with the act that specifies FDA's policies and procedures for the development, issuance, and use of guidance documents. The intended effect of this regulation is to make the agency's procedures for development, issuance, and use of guidance documents clear to the public.
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