Campaign Funds

campaign-funds
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
Federal Election Commission -- Internet Communication Disclaimers and Definition of “Public Communication”2018-Mar-262018-06010The Federal Election Commission requests comment on two alternative proposals to amend its regulations concerning disclaimers on public communications on the internet that contain express advocacy, solicit contributions, or are made by political committees. The Commission is undertaking this rulemaking in light of technological advances since the Commission last revised its rules governing internet disclaimers in 2006, and questions from the public about the application of those rules to internet communications. The Commission's goal is to promulgate a rule that in its text and interpretation recognizes the paramount importance of providing the public with the clearest disclosure of the payor or sponsor of these public communications on the internet. Both proposals are intended to give the American public easy access to information about the persons paying for and candidates authorizing these internet communications, pursuant to the Federal Election Campaign Act. Both proposals would continue to require disclaimers for certain internet communications, and both would allow certain internet communications to provide disclaimers through alternative technology. The proposals differ, however, in their approach. The Commission requests comment on all elements of both proposals. The two proposals need not be considered as fixed alternatives; commenters are encouraged to extract the best elements of each, or suggest improvements or alternatives, to help the Commission fashion the best possible rule. The Commission also requests comment on proposed changes to the definition of ``public communication.'' The Commission has not made any final decisions on any of the issues or proposals presented in this rulemaking.
Federal Election Commission -- Independent Expenditures by Authorized Committees; Reporting Multistate Independent Expenditures and Electioneering Communications2018-Jan-292018-01074The Federal Election Commission requests comments on proposed changes to its regulations concerning independent expenditures by candidates. The Commission also requests comments on proposed changes to its regulations to address reporting of independent expenditures and electioneering communications that relate to presidential primary elections and that are publicly distributed in multiple states but that do not refer to any particular state's primary election. The Commission has made no final decision on the issues and proposals presented in this rulemaking.
Federal Election Commission -- Technical Amendments and Corrections2016-Dec-232016-30699The Commission is making technical corrections to various sections of its regulations. These are non-substantive amendments to correct typographical errors, update references, and remove provisions that no longer apply.
Federal Election Commission -- Technological Modernization2016-Nov-022016-25102The Federal Election Commission requests comment on proposed changes to its regulations to address contributions and expenditures that are made by electronic means, such as through internet-based payment processors or text messaging; to eliminate and update references to outdated technologies; and to address similar issues. The Commission has not made any final decisions about the issues and proposals presented in this rulemaking.
Federal Election Commission -- Technical Amendments and Corrections2016-Jun-012016-12661The Commission is making technical corrections to various sections of its regulations.
Federal Election Commission -- Aggregate Biennial Contribution Limits2014-Dec-242014-30222The Commission is adopting as a final rule, without change, an interim rule that removed regulatory limits on the aggregate amounts that an individual may contribute to federal candidates and political committees in each two-year election cycle. The Commission is taking this action in light of the Supreme Court's recent decision in McCutcheon v. FEC, which held that the aggregate contribution limits are unconstitutional.
Federal Election Commission -- Independent Expenditures and Electioneering Communications by Corporations and Labor Organizations2014-Oct-212014-24666The Federal Election Commission is revising its rules regarding corporate and labor organization funding of expenditures, independent expenditures, and electioneering communications. The Commission is issuing these rules in response to a Petition for Rulemaking filed by the James Madison Center for Free Speech petitioning the Commission to amend its regulations in response to the decision of the Supreme Court in Citizens United v. FEC.
Federal Election Commission -- Aggregate Biennial Contribution Limits2014-Oct-172014-24661The Commission is removing regulatory limits on the aggregate amounts that an individual may contribute to federal candidates and political committees in each two-year election cycle. The Commission is taking this action in light of the Supreme Court's recent decision in McCutcheon v. FEC, which held that the aggregate contribution limits are unconstitutional. The Commission is accepting comments on these revisions to its regulations.
State Department -- Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Corrections, Clarifications, and Movement of Definitions2014-Oct-102014-23792In an effort to streamline, simplify and clarify the recent revisions to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) made pursuant to the President's Export Control Reform (ECR) initiative, the Department of State is amending the ITAR as part of the Department of State's retrospective plan under Executive Order 13563 completed on August 17, 2011.
Federal Election Commission -- Federal Election Campaign Act Rules; Corrections2014-Mar-262014-06590The Commission is making technical corrections to various sections of its regulations.
State Department -- Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Changes to Authorized Officials and the UK Defense Trade Treaty Exemption; Correction of Errors in Lebanon Policy and Violations; and Adoption of Recent Amendments as Final2014-Feb-112014-02293The Department of State is amending the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) to remove the managing director as an authorized official, update the marking and reporting requirements for the UK defense treaty exemption, correct a typographical error in the paragraph on export policy regarding Lebanon, and correct an error of syntactical arrangement in a section of the regulations regarding violations. The Department is also adopting as a final rule certain sections of the ITAR that were published in an interim final rule.
Federal Election Commission -- Limited Liability Partnerships (LLPs)2012-Dec-132012-30029The Commission is proposing new rules addressing the treatment of limited liability partnerships (``LLPs'') for purposes of the Federal Election Campaign Act (``FECA'' or the ``Act''). LLPs are created under State law and share certain characteristics with both partnerships and corporations. The Commission is considering treating all LLPs that have opted for Federal corporate tax treatment pursuant to the Internal Revenue Service's ``check the box'' provisions, as corporations for purposes of the Act. The Commission has made no final decision on the issues presented in this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Participation by Federal Candidates and Officeholders at Non-Federal Fundraising Events2010-May-052010-10571The Federal Election Commission (``Commission'') is revising its rules regarding appearances by Federal officeholders and candidates at State, district, and local party fundraising events under the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended. Consistent with the decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in Shays v. FEC, Federal candidates and officeholders may no longer speak at State, district, and local party fundraising events ``without restriction or regulation.'' The revised rules address participation by Federal candidates and officeholders at all non- Federal fundraising events that are in connection with an election for Federal office or any non-Federal election and in related publicity.
Federal Election Commission -- Funds Received in Response to Solicitations; Allocation of Expenses by Separate Segregated Funds and Nonconnected Committees2010-Mar-192010-6002The Federal Election Commission (``Commission'') is removing its rule regarding funds received in response to solicitations. The Commission is also removing two additional rules regarding the allocation of certain expenses by separate segregated funds and nonconnected committees. The United States District Court for the District of Columbia ordered that these rules are vacated, in accordance with a Court of Appeals decision. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Privacy Act, Government in the Sunshine Act, Freedom of Information Act (“FOIA”), and Federal Election Campaign Act (“FECA”) Rules; Corrections2010-Jan-049-30797The Commission is making technical amendments to various sections of the Privacy Act, Government in the Sunshine Act, FOIA, and FECA rules.
Federal Election Commission -- Funds Received in Response to Solicitations; Allocation of Expenses by Separate Segregated Funds and Nonconnected Committees2009-Dec-299-30768The Federal Election Commission (``Commission'') proposes removing its rules regarding funds received in response to solicitations. The Commission also proposes removing two additional rules regarding the allocation of certain expenses by separate segregated funds and nonconnected committees. The United States District Court for the District of Columbia ordered that these rules are vacated, in accordance with a Court of Appeals decision. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Funds Received in Response to Solicitations; Allocation of Expenses by Separate Segregated Funds and Nonconnected Committees2009-Dec-299-30767The United States District Court for the District of Columbia ordered that the Federal Election Commission's (``Commission'') rules regarding funds received in response to solicitations and the allocation of certain expenses by separate segregated funds and nonconnected committees are vacated. The Commission is inserting a note to these regulations that reflects the court's decision. The Commission will engage in a separate notice of rulemaking to remove these rules from the Code of Federal Regulations. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Participation by Federal Candidates and Officeholders at Non-Federal Fundraising Events2009-Dec-079-28733The Federal Election Commission seeks comments on proposed changes to its rules regarding participation by Federal candidates and officeholders at non-Federal fundraising events under the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended. These proposed changes are in response to the decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in Shays v. FEC. The Commission has made no final decision on the issues presented in this rulemaking.
Federal Election Commission -- Reporting Contributions Bundled by Lobbyists, Registrants and the PACs of Lobbyists and Registrants2009-Feb-179-2838The Federal Election Commission is promulgating regulations implementing new statutory provisions regarding the disclosure of information about bundled contributions provided by certain lobbyists, registrants, and political committees established or controlled by lobbyists and registrants. The final rules require authorized committees, leadership PACs, and political committees of political parties to disclose certain information about lobbyists, registrants, and lobbyists' and registrants' political committees that provide bundled contributions. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Notice 2008-14; Repeal of Increased Contribution and Coordinated Party Expenditure Limits for Candidates Opposing Self-Financed Candidates2008-Dec-308-31032The Federal Election Commission (``Commission'') is removing its rules on increased contribution limits and coordinated party expenditure limits for Senate and House of Representatives candidates facing self-financed opponents. These rules were promulgated to implement sections 304 and 319 of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002, known as the ``Millionaires' Amendment.'' In Davis v. Federal Election Commission, the Supreme Court held that sections 319(a) and (b), regarding House of Representatives elections, were unconstitutional. The Court's analysis also applies to the contribution and spending limits in section 304 regarding Senate elections. The Commission, therefore, is removing its rules that implement the Millionaires' Amendment. However, the Commission is retaining certain other rules that were not affected by the Davis decision. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Increased Contribution and Coordinated Party Expenditure Limits for Candidates Opposing Self-financed Candidates2008-Oct-208-24505The Federal Election Commission (``Commission'') requests comments on the proposed deletion of its rules regarding increased contribution limits and coordinated party expenditure limits for Senate and House of Representatives candidates facing self-financed opponents. These rules were promulgated to implement sections 304 and 319 of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002, known as the ``Millionaires' Amendment.'' In Davis v. Federal Election Commission, the Supreme Court held that sections 319(a) and (b), regarding House of Representatives elections, were unconstitutional. The Court's holding also applies to the contribution and spending limits in section 304 regarding Senate elections. The Commission, therefore, proposes to remove its current rules that implement the Millionaires' Amendment. In addition, the Commission proposes to retain certain other rules that generally are applicable throughout the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended (the ``Act'' or ``FECA''). The Commission has made no final decision on the issues presented in this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Treasury Department -- Payments From the Presidential Primary Matching Payment Account2008-Feb-1408-675In the Rules and Regulations section of this issue of the Federal Register, the IRS is issuing temporary regulations under Part 702, Presidential Primary Matching Payment Account, of title 26 of the CFR, relating to the financing of presidential primary campaigns. The temporary regulations amend Treasury procedures for making payments from the Presidential Primary Matching Payment Account (Primary Account) to eligible primary candidates. The text of those regulations also serves as the text for these proposed regulations.
Treasury Department -- Payments From the Presidential Primary Matching Payment Account2008-Feb-1408-674This document contains final and temporary regulations relating to the financing of presidential primary campaigns. The temporary regulations relate to Treasury procedures for making payments from the Presidential Primary Matching Payment Account (Primary Account). These temporary regulations affect all candidates eligible to receive payments from the Primary Account. The text of the temporary regulations also serves as the text for the proposed regulations (REG- 149475-07) set forth in the notice of proposed rulemaking on this subject in the Proposed Rules section in this issue of the Federal Register.
Federal Election Commission -- Electioneering Communications2007-Dec-267-24797The Federal Election Commission is revising its rules governing electioneering communications. These revisions implement the Supreme Court's decision in FEC v. Wisconsin Right to Life, Inc., which held that the prohibition on the use of corporate and labor organization funds for electioneering communications is unconstitutional as applied to certain types of electioneering communications. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Reporting Contributions Bundled by Lobbyists, Registrants and the PACs of Lobbyists and Registrants2007-Nov-067-21711The Federal Election Commission requests comments on proposed rules implementing new statutory provisions regarding the disclosure of information about bundled contributions provided by certain lobbyists and registrants. The proposed rules would require authorized committees, leadership PACs and political committees of political parties to disclose certain information about lobbyists and registrants and lobbyists' and registrants' political committees that provide bundled contributions. No final decisions have been made by the Commission on any of the proposed regulations in this Notice. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Candidate Travel2007-Oct-237-20901The Federal Election Commission requests comments on proposed changes to its rules implementing new statutory provisions governing the rates and timing of payment for non-commercial campaign travel on aircraft, and a proposed definition of ``Leadership PAC.'' These proposed changes, consistent with the new statutory provisions, would restrict and in some cases prohibit Federal candidates and their political committees from expending campaign funds for non-commercial air travel. The proposed rules would apply to all Federal candidates, including publicly funded presidential candidates. No final decisions have been made by the Commission on any of the proposed revisions in this Notice. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Use of Campaign Funds for Donations to Non-Federal Candidates and Any Other Lawful Purpose Other Than Personal Use2007-Oct-037-19260The Federal Election Commission is revising its rules regarding the use of campaign funds by candidates and other individuals. The revision adds to the current list of permissible uses of campaign funds in Commission regulations: donations to non-Federal candidates; and any other lawful purpose other than personal use. This change conforms the provision with those in the Federal Election Campaign Act, as amended (``the Act''). Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Electioneering Communications2007-Aug-317-17184The Federal Election Commission requests comments on proposed revisions to its rules governing electioneering communications. These proposed rules would implement the Supreme Court's decision in FEC v. Wisconsin Right to Life, Inc., which held that the prohibition on the use of corporate and labor organization funds for electioneering communications is unconstitutional as applied to certain types of electioneering communications. The Commission has made no final decision on the issues presented in this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Use of Campaign Funds for Donations to Non-Federal Candidates and Any Other Lawful Purpose Other Than Personal Use2007-Jul-197-13956The Federal Election Commission requests comments on a proposed revision to its rules regarding the use of campaign funds. The proposed revision would add to the current list of permissible uses of campaign funds in Commission regulations: donations to non-Federal candidates; and any other lawful purpose other than personal use. This change would conform the provision with those in the Federal Election Campaign Act, as amended (``the Act''). The Commission has made no final decision on the issues presented in this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Hybrid Communications2007-May-107-8956The Federal Election Commission requests comments on a proposed rule to attribute the disbursements for a public communication made by a political party that refers to a clearly identified Federal candidate and that also generically refers to other candidates of a political party without clearly identifying them. Several alternatives are presented, including an alternative to include public communications that refer to multiple Federal candidates. The Commission has made no final decision on the issues presented in this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
State Department -- Amendments to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Office Names, Corrected Cross-Referencing, Reference to Wassenaar Arrangement, and Other Corrections/Administrative Changes2006-Apr-2106-3500The Department of State is amending the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) to reflect current office names, correct cross-references, update the reference to the Wassenaar Arrangement, and make other corrections and administrative changes.
Federal Election Commission -- Internet Communications2006-Apr-1206-3190The Federal Election Commission is amending its rules to include paid advertisements on the Internet in the definition of ``public communication.'' These final rules implement the recent decision of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia in Shays v. Federal Election Commission, which held that the previous definition of ``public communication'' impermissibly excluded all Internet communications. The revised definition of ``public communication'' includes paid Internet advertising placed on another person's website, but does not encompass any other form of Internet communication. The Commission is also re-promulgating without change its definition of ``generic campaign activity'' and amending the scope of its disclaimer regulations, both of which incorporate the revised definition of ``public communication.'' Additionally, the Commission is adding new exceptions to the definitions of ``contribution'' and ``expenditure'' to exclude Internet activities and communications that qualify as individual activity or that qualify for the ``media exemption.'' These final rules are intended to ensure that political committees properly finance and disclose their Internet communications, without impeding individual citizens from using the Internet to speak freely regarding candidates and elections. Further information is provided in the Supplementary Information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Definitions of “Solicit” and “Direct”2006-Mar-2006-2623The Federal Election Commission is revising its definitions of the terms ``to solicit'' and ``to direct'' for its regulations on raising and spending Federal and non-Federal funds. The new definition of ``to solicit'' encompasses written and oral communications that, construed as reasonably understood in the context in which they are made, contain a clear message asking, requesting, or recommending, explicitly or implicitly, that another person make a contribution, donation, transfer of funds, or otherwise provide something of value. Mere statements of political support and mere guidance as to the application of the law are not included. The revised definition also contains a list of examples, to provide practical guidance to Federal candidates, officeholders, political committee officials, and others. The new definition of ``to direct'' focuses on guidance provided directly or indirectly to a person who has expressed an intent to make a contribution, donation, or transfer of funds. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- State, District, and Local Party Committee Payment of Certain Salaries and Wages2005-Dec-2005-24249The Federal Election Commission is amending its rules to revise the method by which State, district and local party committees (collectively ``State party committees'') may pay salaries and wages of employees who spend 25 percent or less of their compensated time in a month on Federal election activity or activity in connection with Federal elections (``Federal-related activity'' or ``Federal-related activities''). These final rules implement the decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in Shays v. FEC, which held that the Commission had not provided an adequate explanation for its former rules under the Administrative Procedure Act. The Commission is also changing its requirements regarding the method State party committees use to pay for employees' fringe benefits and clarifying its rules regarding the use of funds raised in joint Federal and non-Federal fundraising events. Further information is provided in the Supplementary Information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- $5,000 Exemption for Disbursements of Levin Funds by State, District, and Local Party Committees and Organizations2005-Nov-1705-22778The Federal Election Commission is eliminating from its regulations an exemption allowing State, district, and local committees and organizations of a political party to use only Levin funds to pay for certain types of Federal election activity aggregating $5,000 or less in a calendar year. In Shays v. FEC, the District Court invalidated the exemption and remanded the regulation to the Commission for further action consistent with the court's opinion. The Commission appealed this ruling, and the Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit affirmed the District Court's decision. The repeal of this rule means that State, district, and local political party committees and organizations must pay for these specific types of Federal election activity either entirely with Federal funds, or with a mix of Federal funds and Levin funds. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Definitions of “Solicit” and “Direct''2005-Sep-2805-19330The Federal Election Commission requests comments on proposed revisions to its definitions of the terms ``to solicit'' and ``to direct'' for its regulations on raising and spending Federal and non- Federal funds. Current Commission regulations define ``to solicit'' as ``to ask that another person make a contribution, donation, transfer of funds, or otherwise provide anything of value.'' The regulations define ``to direct'' as ``to ask a person who has expressed an intent to make a contribution, donation, or transfer of funds, or to provide anything of value, to make that contribution, donation, or transfer of funds, or to provide that thing of value.'' These rules were challenged in Shays v. FEC. Upholding a District Court decision, the Court of Appeals held that the Commission's definitions of ``to solicit'' and ``to direct'' were invalid because they violated Congress's intent. The Commission has filed a petition for a rehearing en banc of the Court of Appeals decision. At the same time, to comply with the decisions of the District Court and the Court of Appeals, the Commission is issuing this Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding its definitions of ``to solicit'' and ``to direct.'' No final decision has been made by the Commission on the issues presented in this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- State, District, and Local Party Committee Payment of Certain Salaries and Wages2005-May-0405-8863The Federal Election Commission is seeking comment on proposed changes to regulations regarding payments by State, district or local party committees for salaries and wages of employees who spend 25 percent or less of their compensated time in a month on Federal election activity and activity in connection with Federal elections. Currently, these committees may use funds whose only restriction is that they comply with State law. The proposed changes would require these expenses to be paid using at least some Federal funds, consistent with the ruling of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia in Shays v. Federal Election Commission. The Commission is appealing this ruling to the DC Circuit. In the interim, the Commission is initiating this rulemaking. The Commission has not made any final decision on the issues presented in this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Internet Communications2005-Apr-0405-6521The Federal Election Commission requests comments on proposed changes to its rules that would include paid advertisements on the Internet in the definition of ``public communication.'' These changes to the Commission's rules would implement the recent decision of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia in Shays v. Federal Election Commission, which held that the current definition of ``public communication'' impermissibly excludes all Internet communications. Comment is also sought on the related definition of ``generic campaign activity'' and on proposed changes to the disclaimer regulations. Additionally, comment is sought on proposed new exceptions to the definitions of ``contribution'' and ``expenditure'' for certain Internet activities and communications that would qualify as individual volunteer activity or that would qualify for the ``press exemption.'' These proposals are intended to ensure that political committees properly finance and disclose their Internet communications, without impeding individual citizens from using the Internet to speak freely regarding candidates and elections. The Commission has made no final decision on the issues raised in this rulemaking. Further information appears in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Filing Documents by Priority Mail, Express Mail, and Overnight Delivery Service2005-Mar-1805-5391The Federal Election Commission is promulgating amended rules regarding the timely filing of designations, reports, and statements. Under these final rules, the Commission will consider certain documents to be filed prior to actual receipt, if such documents are sent using Priority Mail, Express Mail, or delivered by an overnight delivery service. Further information is provided in the Supplementary Information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Political Party Committees Donating Funds to Certain Tax-Exempt Organizations and Political Organizations2005-Mar-1605-5159The Federal Election Commission is revising its regulations governing donations made or directed by national, State, district, and local political party committees to certain tax-exempt organizations and political organizations. The final rules allow these political party committees to make or direct donations of Federal funds to certain 501(c) tax-exempt organizations and certain 527 political organizations. These revisions conform the Commission's rules to the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in McConnell v. Federal Election Commission, which included a narrowing construction of section 101 of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Candidate Solicitation at State, District, and Local Party Fundraising Events2005-Feb-2405-3471The Federal Election Commission seeks comments on proposed changes to its rule regarding appearances by Federal officeholders and candidates at State, district, and local party fundraising events under the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended (``FECA'' or the ``Act''). The current regulation contains an exemption permitting Federal officeholders and candidates to speak at State, district, and local party fundraising events ``without restriction or regulation.'' This regulation was challenged in Shays v. FEC. The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia held that this regulation implementing the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 was based on a permissible construction of the statute. However, the district court also held that the Commission had not provided adequate explanation of its decision to permit Federal candidates and officeholders to speak ``without restriction or regulation,'' and therefore had not satisfied the reasoned analysis requirement of the Administrative Procedure Act. The district court remanded the regulation to the Commission for further action consistent with the court's opinion. Accordingly, in order to comply with the court's decision, the Commission now revisits the exemption for candidate and Federal officeholder speech at State, district, and local party fundraising events. The Commission has made no final decision on the issues presented in this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Contributions and Donations by Minors2005-Feb-0305-2003The Federal Election Commission is amending its rules regarding contributions and donations by individuals aged 17 years or younger (``Minors''). These final rules conform to the decision of the United States Supreme Court in McConnell v. Federal Election Commission. In McConnell, the Supreme Court held unconstitutional section 318 of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002, which prohibited Minors from contributing to candidates and from contributing or donating to political party committees. Accordingly, this final rule amends the Commission's regulations to reflect the Supreme Court's decision by removing the regulatory prohibitions on contributions by Minors to candidates, and on contributions and donations by Minors to political party committees. Additional information appears in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section.
Federal Election Commission -- De Minimis Exemption for Disbursement of Levin Funds by State, District, and Local Party Committees2005-Feb-0205-1891The Federal Election Commission requests comments on proposed revisions to the Commission's regulations that establish a de minimis exemption allowing State, district, and local committees of a political party to pay for certain Federal election activity aggregating $5,000 or less in a calendar year entirely with Levin funds. In Shays v. FEC, the District Court held that the Commission's de minimis exemption was inconsistent with the statutory intent of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act and remanded the regulation to the Commission for further action consistent with the court's opinion. The Commission is appealing this ruling to the D.C. Circuit. In the interim, the Commission is initiating this rulemaking. No final decision has been made by the Commission on the issues presented in this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Definition of “Agent” for BCRA Regulations on Non-Federal Funds or Soft Money and Coordinated and Independent Expenditures2005-Feb-0205-1892The Federal Election Commission requests comments on the proposed revision of the definition of ``agent'' for its regulations on coordinated and independent expenditures, and non-Federal funds, which are commonly referred to as ``soft money.'' Current Commission regulations define agent as ``any person who has actual authority, either express or implied'' to perform certain actions. This definition does not include persons acting only with apparent authority. The Commission's regulations defining agent were challenged in Shays v. FEC. The District Court held that the Commission's definitions of agent did not necessarily run contrary to Congress's intent and were based on a permissible construction of the statute. However, the court also held that the Commission had not provided adequate explanation of its decision to exclude from the definition of agent persons acting only with apparent authority and therefore had not satisfied the reasoned analysis requirement of the Administrative Procedures Act. The court remanded the regulations to the Commission for further action consistent with the court's opinion. Accordingly, in order to comply with the court's decision, the Commission now revisits the definition of agent by issuing this Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. No final decision has been made by the Commission on the issues presented in this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Filing Documents by Priority Mail, Express Mail, and Overnight Delivery Service2004-Dec-2204-27972The Federal Election Commission requests comments on proposed changes to its rules regarding the timely filing of designations, reports, and statements. The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2004 added Priority Mail, Express Mail, and delivery by an overnight delivery service to the section of the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended, setting forth when and by what means certain paper documents are considered timely filed prior to actual receipt by the Commission or the Secretary of the Senate. No final decision has been made by the Commission on the issues presented in this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Political Party Committees Donating Funds to Certain Tax-Exempt Organizations and Political Organizations2004-Dec-0904-27025The Federal Election Commission requests comments on proposed amendments to its rules governing limitations on national, State, district, and local political party committees making or directing donations to certain tax-exempt organizations and political organizations. These proposed rules would conform to the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in McConnell v. FEC, which included a narrowing construction of section 101 of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002. The Commission has not made any final decisions on the issues presented in this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Technical Amendments to Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (“BCRA”) Rules and Explanation and Justification2004-Nov-2404-26042The Commission is making technical amendments to correct certain citations and headings in the BCRA final rules governing the definitions of ``contribution'' and ``expenditure,'' personal use of campaign funds, and reporting. Corrections are also being made to the explanation and justification for the BCRA rules on disclaimers and personal use of campaign funds. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Political Committee Status, Definition of Contribution, and Allocation for Separate Segregated Funds and Nonconnected Committees2004-Nov-2304-25946The Federal Election Commission (``Commission'') is revising portions of its regulations regarding the definition of ``contribution'' and the allocation of certain costs and expenses by separate segregated funds (``SSFs'') and nonconnected committees. A new rule explains when funds received in response to certain communications by any person must be treated as ``contributions.'' In the allocation regulations, the final rules eliminate the previous allocation formula under which SSFs and nonconnected committees used the ``funds expended'' method to calculate a ratio for use of Federal and non- Federal funds for administrative and generic voter drive expenses, replacing it with a flat 50% minimum. These rules also spell out how SSFs and nonconnected committees must pay for voter drives and certain public communications. Other changes proposed previously regarding the definitions of ``political committee'' and ``expenditure'' are not being adopted. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Coordinated and Independent Expenditures by Party Committees2004-Nov-0304-24475The Federal Election Commission is removing its rules restricting the ability of political party committees to make both independent expenditures and coordinated party expenditures with respect to the same candidate's general election campaign for Federal office. The Commission is also repealing its rules prohibiting political party committees that make coordinated party expenditures with respect to a candidate from transferring funds to, or assigning authority to make coordinated party expenditures to, or receiving a transfer of funds from, a political party committee that has made or intends to make an independent expenditure with respect to that candidate. These rules were originally promulgated to implement section 213 of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002. However, in McConnell v. FEC, the U.S. Supreme Court held that section 213 is unconstitutional. Therefore, the Commission is now removing the rules implementing section 213. Further information is provided in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Presidential Inaugural Committee Reporting and Prohibition on Accepting Donations From Foreign Nationals2004-Oct-0604-22393The Federal Election Commission is promulgating new rules regarding disclosure requirements for Presidential inaugural committees. The new rules also ban inaugural committees from accepting donations from foreign nationals. These regulations implement requirements of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002. Further information is provided in the Supplementary Information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Coordinated and Independent Expenditures by Party Committees2004-Jun-3004-14817The Federal Election Commission requests comments on the proposed deletion of its current rules that restrict the ability of political party committees to make both independent expenditures and coordinated party expenditures with respect to the same candidate in connection with a general election for Federal office. The current rules also prohibit a political party committee that makes coordinated expenditures with respect to a candidate from transferring funds to, or assigning authority to make coordinated expenditures to, or receive a transfer of funds from, a political party committee that has made or intends to make an independent expenditure with respect to that candidate. These rules were promulgated in order to implement section 213 of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002. However, in McConnell v. FEC, the U.S. Supreme Court held that section 213 is unconstitutional. Therefore, the Commission proposes to remove the rules implementing section 213. No final decision has been made by the Commission on the issues presented in this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Political Committee Status2004-Mar-1104-5290The Federal Election Commission is seeking comment on whether to amend the definition of ``political committee'' applicable to nonconnected committees. The Commission is also considering amending its current regulations to address when disbursements for certain election activity should be treated as ``expenditures.'' Related amendments to the allocation regulations for nonconnected committees and separate segregated funds are also under consideration to determine whether those regulations need further refinement. While the Commission requests comments on proposed changes to its rules, it has made no final decisions on any of the proposed revisions in this notice. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Travel on Behalf of Candidates and Political Committees2003-Dec-1503-30872The Federal Election Commission is promulgating new and revised rules regarding the proper rates and timing for payment for travel on behalf of political committees and candidates on means of transportation that are not offered for commercial passenger service, including government conveyances. The final rules provide more comprehensive guidance than the previous regulations by establishing a single, uniform valuation scheme for campaign travel that does not depend on whether the service provider is a corporation, labor organization, individual, partnership, limited liability company or other entity. The final rules apply to all Federal candidates, including publicly funded presidential candidates as well as other individuals traveling on behalf of candidates, party committees, and other political committees where the travel is in connection with Federal elections. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Party Committee Telephone Banks2003-Nov-1403-28472The Federal Election Commission is promulgating final rules regarding the attribution of political party committee disbursements for telephone bank communications made on behalf of a clearly identified Federal candidate. The final rules address the proper attribution of a party committee's or party organization's disbursements for communications that refer to a clearly identified Federal candidate when the party's other candidates are referred to generically, but not by name. The entire disbursement must be paid for with Federal funds. Further information is provided in the Supplementary Information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Multicandidate Committees and Biennial Contribution Limits2003-Nov-1403-28469The Federal Election Commission is revising its rules covering four areas: (1) Multicandidate political committee status, (2) annual contributions by persons other than multicandidate committees to national party committees, (3) contributions to candidates for more than one Federal office; and (4) biennial contribution limits for individuals. These final rules provide that once a political committee satisfies certain criteria, it automatically becomes a multicandidate committee and is required to notify the Commission of its new status. The final rules also update the limit on contributions from persons other than multicandidate committees to national party committees and to candidates running for more than one Federal office. In addition, the final rules adjust the attribution of contributions to candidates from individuals under the biennial limits. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Mailing Lists of Political Committees2003-Sep-0403-22530The Federal Election Commission requests comments on proposed additions to its rules covering the sale, rental, and exchange of political committee mailing lists. The proposed rules address when the proceeds of a political committee's rental or sale of its mailing list, or an exchange of its mailing list with another entity, would be considered a contribution to that committee subject to the limitations and prohibitions of the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971. The proposed rules also address the personal use by a candidate of his or her authorized committee's mailing list. Finally, the proposed rules address the sale or rental of a mailing list by an authorized committee of a publicly funded presidential candidate. The Commission has not made any final decisions on any of the proposed revisions in this Notice. Further information is provided in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Party Committee Telephone Banks2003-Sep-0403-22533The Federal Election Commission requests comments on proposed changes to its rules regarding the allocation of political party committee expenditures for telephone bank communications made on behalf of a presidential candidate. The proposed rules would address the proper allocation of a party committee's expenditures for such communications that refer to presidential and vice-presidential nominees when the party's other candidates are referred to generically, but not by name. The amount allocated as an expenditure on behalf of, or a contribution to, the presidential nominee would be subject to the limitations and prohibitions of the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971. The Commission has not made any final decisions on the revisions proposed in this Notice. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Multicandidate Committees and Biennial Contribution Limits2003-Aug-2103-21462The Federal Election Commission requests comments on proposed changes to its rules covering three areas: (1) Multicandidate political committee status, (2) annual contributions by persons other than multicandidate committees to national party committees, and (3) biennial contribution limits for individuals. The proposed changes would clarify the qualifications for multicandidate political committee status and require a political committee to notify the Commission when it has qualified as a multicandidate committee. The proposed changes would also update the limit on contributions from persons other than multicandidate committees to national party committees. In addition, the proposed changes would adjust the attribution of contributions to candidates from individuals under the biennial limits. No final decisions have been made by the Commission on any of the proposed revisions in this Notice. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Candidate Travel2003-Aug-2103-21463The Federal Election Commission requests comments on proposed changes to its rules covering the proper rates and timing for payment of candidate travel on private means of transportation that are not offered for commercial use, including government conveyances. The proposed rule would provide more comprehensive guidance than the current regulations by establishing a single, uniform valuation scheme for campaign travel that does not depend on whether the service provider is a corporation, labor organization, individual, partnership, limited liability company or other entity, or on whether the destination city is served by regularly scheduled commercial service. The proposed rules would apply to all Federal candidates including publicly funded presidential candidates. No final decisions have been made by the Commission on any of the proposed revisions in this Notice. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Public Financing of Presidential Candidates and Nominating Conventions2003-Aug-0803-19893The Federal Election Commission is revising several portions of its regulations governing the public financing of Presidential candidates, in both primary and general election campaigns, and Presidential nominating conventions. These regulations implement the provisions of the Presidential Election Campaign Fund Act (``Fund Act'') and the Presidential Matching Payment Account Act (``Matching Payment Act''), which establish eligibility requirements for Presidential candidates and convention committees seeking public financing and indicate how funds received under the public financing system may be spent. The revised rules also implement the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002, as it applies particularly to the Fund Act and the Matching Payment Act. The revised rules reflect the Commission's experience in administering these programs, particularly during the 2000 election cycle, and anticipate some questions that may arise during the 2004 Presidential election cycle. Further information is contained in the Supplementary Information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Public Financing of Presidential Candidates and Nominating Conventions2003-Apr-1503-8761The Federal Election Commission requests comments on proposed changes to its rules governing publicly financed presidential candidates, in both the primary and general elections, and national nominating conventions. These regulations implement the provisions of the Presidential Election Campaign Fund Act and the Presidential Matching Payment Account Act, which establish eligibility requirements for presidential candidates and convention committees seeking public financing and indicate how funds received under the public financing system may be spent. They also require the Commission to audit publicly financed committees and seek repayment where appropriate. The proposed rules implement the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002, as it applies particularly to the Presidential Election Campaign Fund Act and the Presidential Matching Payment Account Act. The proposed rules also reflect the Commission's experience in administering this program during the 2000 election cycle and seek to anticipate some questions that may arise during the 2004 presidential election cycle. No final decisions have been made by the Commission on any of the proposed revisions in this document. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Increased Contribution and Coordinated Party Expenditure Limits for Candidates Opposing Self-Financed Candidates2003-Jan-2703-1546The Federal Election Commission (``FEC'' or ``Commission'') is adopting, as interim final rules, new regulations relating to increased contribution limits for individuals when contributing to candidates who are facing self-financed candidates under the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (``FECA'' or the ``Act''), as amended by the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (``BCRA''). The so-called ``Millionaires' Amendment'' in BCRA raises the individual contribution limits for candidates for the Senate and House of Representatives depending on the amount that opposing candidates expend from personal funds in connection with an election. BCRA also removes the limitations on national and State party committee expenditures on behalf of a candidate if the opposing candidate's expenditures from personal funds exceed a threshold amount. These interim final rules implement the various provisions of the Millionaires' Amendment including thresholds, computation formulas, increased contribution limits with overall caps, repayment of personal loans, and reporting requirements. The Commission is promulgating these rules on an interim final basis. The Commission is soliciting comments on all aspects of the interim final rules and may amend the interim rules as appropriate in response to comments received. Further information is contained in the Supplementary Information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- BCRA Technical Corrections2003-Jan-2203-1184The Commission published technical amendments to its regulations on December 26, 2002, entitled ``BCRA Technical Amendments.'' These amendments became effective upon publication. However, some of the amendments changed regulations that were promulgated but had not become effective as of December 26, 2002, and therefore could not take effect. Thus, the Commission is re- promulgating the technical amendments that did not take effect with the original BRCA technical amendments. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Coordinated and Independent Expenditures2003-Jan-0303-90The Federal Election Commission is issuing final rules regarding payments for communications that are coordinated with a candidate, a candidate's authorized committee, or a political party committee. The final rules also address expenditures by political party committees that are made either in coordination with, or independently from, candidates. These final rules implement several requirements in the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (``BCRA'') that significantly amend the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended (``FECA'' or the ``Act''). Further information is contained in the Supplementary Information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 Reporting2003-Jan-0303-91The Federal Election Commission is promulgating new and revised rules regarding the reporting of electioneering communications and independent expenditures, monthly reporting by national political party committees and quarterly reporting by the principal campaign committees of candidates for the House of Representatives and Senate, as well as reporting related to party committee building funds. These rules implement several provisions of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (``BCRA'') that amend the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended (``FECA'' or ``the Act''). Further information is provided in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Leadership PACS2002-Dec-2602-32451The Federal Election Commission is seeking comment on proposed rules to address leadership PACs, which are unauthorized committees that are associated with a Federal candidate or officeholder. Please note that the draft rules that follow do not represent a final decision by the Commission on the issues presented by this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- BCRA Technical Amendments2002-Dec-2602-32452The Commission recently reorganized the sections defining ``contributions'' and ``expenditures,'' and also redesignated other sections. These technical amendments correct cites in title 11 of the Code of Federal Regulations to bring the regulations into conformity with the designation. Additionally, the final rules correct typographical mistakes made in the recently promulgated Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act rulemakings. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Disclaimers, Fraudulent Solicitation, Civil Penalties, and Personal Use of Campaign Funds2002-Dec-1302-31521The Federal Election Commission is issuing final rules regarding disclaimers in political communications, fraudulent solicitations, civil penalties, personal use of campaign funds, and a technical amendment under the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended (``FECA'' or ``the Act''). The final rules implement portions of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (``BCRA'') that govern new requirements for disclaimers accompanying radio, television, print, and other campaign communications, expand the FECA's fraudulent misrepresentation prohibition, increase the FECA's civil penalties for violating the prohibition on contributions made in the name of another, and codify the ``irrespective'' test regarding the personal use of campaign funds by candidates and Federal office holders. The Commission had planned to address BCRA-related rules for inaugural committees in this rulemaking; however, inaugural committees will now instead be addressed in a future rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Contribution Limitations and Prohibitions2002-Nov-1902-28886The Federal Election Commission is issuing these final rules to implement amendments made by the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (``BCRA'') to the contribution limitations and prohibitions of the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended (``FECA'' or ``the Act''). These rules increase the limits on contributions made by individuals and political committees; index certain contribution limits for inflation; prohibit contributions by minors to candidates, authorized committees and committees of political parties and donations by minors to committees of political parties; and prohibit contributions, donations, expenditures, independent expenditures and disbursements by foreign nationals. These rules also revise the Commission's rules for designating contributions to particular elections and attributing contributions to particular donors. Further information is provided in the Supplementary Information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002; Reporting2002-Oct-2102-26394The Federal Election Commission seeks comments on the proposed regulations relating to new requirements for the reporting of electioneering communications and independent expenditures, monthly reporting by national political party committees and quarterly reporting by the principal campaign committees of candidates for the House of Representatives and Senate, as well as reporting related to building funds. These regulations would implement several requirements in the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (``BCRA'') that significantly amend the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended (``FECA'' or ``the Act''). Please note that the Commission has not made a final decision on any of these proposals. Further information is contained in the Supplementary Information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Disclaimers, Fraudulent Solicitation, Civil Penalties, and Personal Use of Campaign Funds2002-Aug-2902-21893The Federal Election Commission seeks comments on proposed changes to its rules relating to disclaimers in political communications, fraudulent solicitations, civil penalties, and personal use of campaign funds under the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended (``FECA'' or ``the Act''). The proposed rules implement the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (``BCRA''), which specifies new requirements for disclaimers accompanying radio, television, and print campaign communications; expands the scope of FECA's fraudulent misrepresentation prohibition; increases FECA's civil penalties for violating the prohibition on contributions made in the name of another; and codifies the ``irrespective'' test for permissible use of campaign funds by candidates and Federal office holders. The Commission had planned to address BCRA-related rules for inaugural committees in this rulemaking; however, inaugural committees will now instead be addressed in a future rulemaking. Please note that the draft rules that follow do not represent a final decision by the Commission on the issues presented by this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Contribution Limitations and Prohibitions2002-Aug-2202-21277The Federal Election Commission seeks comments on proposed changes to its rules relating to contribution limitations and prohibitions under the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended (``FECA'' or ``the Act''). The proposed rules are based on the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (``BCRA''), which increases contribution limits for individuals and political committees; prohibits contributions and donations by minors to certain political committees; and prohibits contributions, donations, and certain expenditures and disbursements by foreign nationals. Please note that the draft rules that follow do not represent a final decision by the Commission on the issues presented by this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Electioneering Communications2002-Aug-0702-19996The Federal Election Commission is seeking comment on proposed rules regarding electioneering communications, which are certain broadcast, cable, and satellite communications that refer to a clearly identified Federal candidate within 60 days of a general election or within 30 days of a primary election for Federal office. The proposed rules implement the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (``BCRA''), which adds to the Federal Election Campaign Act (``FECA'' or ``the Act'') new provisions regarding ``electioneering communications.'' The proposed rules would require any person who makes disbursements for electioneering communications in excess of $10,000 in a calendar year to file a disclosure statement within 24 hours of the time the disbursements exceed $10,000. Additionally, BCRA prohibits incorporated entities and labor organizations from making electioneering communications. The proposed rules would implement this prohibition. Please note that the draft rules that follow do not represent a final decision by the Commission on the issues presented by this rulemaking. In fact, some of the draft rules are offered as alternatives. Regardless, the Commission seeks comments on all of the issues that are raised in this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Prohibited and Excessive Contributions: Non-Federal Funds or Soft Money2002-Jul-2902-18311The Federal Election Commission is revising its rules relating to funds raised, received, and spent by party committees under the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended (``FECA'' or the ``Act''). The revisions are based on the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (``BCRA''), which adds to the Act new restrictions and prohibitions on the receipt, solicitation, and use of certain types of non-Federal funds, which are commonly referred to as ``soft money.'' BCRA and the revised rules prohibit national parties from raising or spending non-Federal funds. They also permit State, district, and local party committees to fund certain ``Federal election activity,'' including certain voter registration and get-out-the-vote (``GOTV'') drives, with money raised pursuant to new limitations, prohibitions, and reporting requirements under BCRA, or with a combination of funds subject to various requirements of the Act and BCRA. They also address fundraising by Federal and non-Federal candidates and Federal officeholders on behalf of political party committees, other candidates, and non-profit organizations. Further information is contained in the Supplementary Information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Brokerage Loans and Lines of Credit2002-Jun-0402-13689The Department of Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2001, amended the Federal Election Campaign Act (``FECA'' or ``the Act'') to allow a candidate to obtain a loan derived from an advance on a candidate's brokerage account, credit card, home equity line of credit, or other line of credit available to the candidate. The Federal Election Commission (``Commission'') is issuing this final rule to implement this amendment to the FECA including reporting requirements. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Prohibited and Excessive Contributions; Non-Federal Funds or Soft Money2002-May-2002-12177The Federal Election Commission seeks comments on proposed changes to its rules relating to funds raised, received, and spent by party committees under the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended (``FECA'' or the ``Act''). The proposed rules are based on the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (``BCRA''), which adds to the Act new restrictions and prohibitions on the receipt, solicitation, and use of certain types of non-Federal funds, which are commonly referred to as ``soft money.'' BCRA and the proposed rules prohibit national parties and Federal candidates and officeholders from raising non- Federal funds. They also generally require State, district, and local party committees to fund ``Federal election activity,'' including voter registration and get-out-the-vote (``GOTV'') drives, with money raised pursuant to the limitations, prohibitions, and reporting requirements of the Act, or with a combination of funds subject to various requirements of the Act and BCRA. They also address fundraising by Federal and non-Federal candidates and officeholders on behalf of political party committees, other candidates, and non-profit organizations. BCRA's general effective date is November 6, 2002, the day following the November 2002 general election, although national party committees that received soft money prior to that date may use these funds for certain purposes before January 1, 2003. The changes to the Act's contribution limits take effect on January 1, 2003. Further information is contained in the Supplementary Information that follows. Please note that the Commission has not made a final decision on any of these proposals.
Federal Election Commission -- Independent Expenditure Reporting2002-Mar-2002-6719The Federal Election Commission is revising its regulations to implement statutory changes to the deadlines for filing certain reports of independent expenditures. Under the new law, reports of last minute independent expenditures (``24-hour reports'') must be actually received by the Commission or the Secretary of the Senate's office within 24 hours of the time the independent expenditure was made. To assist those who must meet this new reporting deadline, the revised rules allow reports of last minute independent expenditures to be filed by facsimile machine or electronic mail, unless the filer participates in the Commission's electronic filing program. Electronic filers must continue to file all reports of independent expenditures (24-hour reports as well as regularly scheduled reports) using the Commission's electronic filing system. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Technical Amendments to Election Cycle Reporting2001-Nov-3001-29679This document contains corrections to the final regulations regarding election cycle reporting by the authorized committees of candidates for Federal office, which were published in the Federal Register of Tuesday, July 11, 2000, (65 FR 42619). The corrections reinstate two paragraphs of 11 CFR 104.3(b)(4)(i) that were inadvertently omitted when the election cycle reporting regulations were published. The two omitted paragraphs contain instructions for authorized committees when reporting expenditures.
Federal Election Commission -- Brokerage Loans and Lines of Credit2001-Jul-2501-18439The Department of Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2001, amended the Federal Election Campaign Act (``FECA'' or ``the Act'') to allow a candidate to obtain a loan derived from an advance on a candidate's brokerage account, credit card, home equity line of credit, or other line of credit available to the candidate. The Federal Election Commission (``Commission'') is issuing this notice of proposed rulemaking (``NPRM'') to solicit comments on its proposal to implement this amendment to the FECA. Please note that the draft rules that follow do not represent a final decision by the Commission on the issues presented by this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Independent Expenditure Reporting2001-May-0901-11587The Federal Election Commission is seeking comment on proposed rules to implement statutory changes to the procedures for filing certain reports of independent expenditures. The proposed rules would require that reports of last minute independent expenditures (``24-hour reports'') be received by the Commission or the Secretary of the Senate's office within 24 hours of the time the expenditure was made. To assist filers in meeting this new filing deadline, the proposed rules would allow reports of last minute independent expenditures to be filed by facsimile machine or electronic mail, unless the filer participates in the Commission's electronic filing program. In addition to faxing or e-mailing 24-hour reports, persons other than political committees (who are not part of the electronic filing program) would be allowed to fax or e-mail any reports of independent expenditures filed under the regular reporting schedules. However, electronic filers must continue to file all reports of independent expenditures (24-hour reports as well as regularly scheduled reports) using the Commission's electronic filing system. Please note that the draft rules that follow do not represent a final decision by the Commission on the issues presented by this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- General Public Political Communications Coordinated With Candidates and Party Committees; Independent Expenditures2000-Dec-0600-31013The Federal Election Commission is adopting new rules to address expenditures for coordinated communications that include clearly identified candidates, and that are paid for by persons other than candidates, candidates' authorized committees, and party committees. The rules address expenditures for communications made at the request or suggestion of a candidate, authorized committee or party committee; as well as those where any such person has exercised control or decision-making authority over the communication, or has engaged in substantial discussion or negotiation with those involved in creating, producing, distributing or paying for the communication. The Commission is also revising the definition of ``independent expenditure,'' to conform with this new definition. Further changes to the rules on coordination between political party committees and their candidates are awaiting the outcome of a pending Supreme Court case. Additional information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Election Cycle Reporting by Authorized Committees2000-Jul-1100-17486The Federal Election Commission is revising its regulations to require authorized committees of Federal candidates to aggregate, itemize and report all receipts and disbursements on an election-cycle basis rather than on a calendar-year-to-date basis. Beginning with reporting periods that start on or after January 1, 2001, authorized committees must report their receipts and disbursements on an election- cycle basis. Please note that this change affects only authorized committees of Federal candidates and does not affect unauthorized committees or other persons. This requirement reflects recent changes in the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971. The intent of these rules is to simplify recordkeeping and reporting requirements for authorized committees of Federal candidates and to better disclose receipts and disbursements that occur during an election cycle. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Electronic Filing of Reports by Political Committees2000-Jun-2100-15668The Federal Election Commission is revising its regulations to implement a mandatory electronic filing system for reports of campaign finance activity filed with the agency. Beginning with reporting periods that start on or after January 1, 2001, all political committees (except the authorized committees of candidates for U.S. Senate) and other persons will be required to file electronically when either their total contributions or total expenditures within a calendar year exceed, or are expected to exceed, $50,000. The Commission has had a voluntary electronic filing system in place since 1996. Voluntary electronic filing will still be an option for political committees and persons who do not exceed the $50,000 threshold. This mandatory system is designed to reflect recent changes to the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Administrative Fines2000-May-1900-12484The Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act, 2000, amended the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (hereinafter ``the Act'' or ``FECA'') to permit the Federal Election Commission to impose civil money penalties for violations of the reporting requirements of the FECA that occur between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2001. The amendments are intended to expedite and streamline the Commission's enforcement procedures. The Commission is promulgating amendments to its compliance procedure regulations to implement the new program. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Election Cycle Reporting by Authorized Committees2000-May-0300-10962The Federal Election Commission is seeking comment on proposed rules to require authorized committees of Federal candidates to aggregate, itemize and report all receipts and disbursements on an election-cycle basis rather than on the current calendar-year-to-date basis. This requirement reflects recent changes in the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971. The intent of these proposed rules is to simplify recordkeeping and reporting requirements for authorized committees of Federal candidates and to better disclose receipts and disbursements that occur during an election cycle. Please note that the draft rules that follow do not represent a final decision by the Commission on the issues presented by this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Electronic Filing of Reports by Political Committees2000-Apr-1100-8884The Federal Election Commission is seeking comment on proposed rules to implement a mandatory electronic filing system for reports of campaign finance activity filed with the agency. Political committees and other persons would be required to file electronically when either their total contributions or total expenditures within a calendar year exceed $50,000. The Commission has had a voluntary electronic filing system in place since 1996. Voluntary electronic filing would still be an option for political committees and persons who do not exceed the $50,000 threshold. This mandatory system is designed to reflect recent changes in the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971. Please note that the draft rules that follow do not represent a final decision by the Commission on the issues presented by this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
Federal Election Commission -- Administrative Fines2000-Mar-2900-7618The Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act, 2000, amended the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (hereinafter ``the Act'' or ``FECA'') to permit the Federal Election Commission to impose civil money penalties for violations of the reporting requirements of the FECA that occur between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2001. The amendments are intended to expedite and streamline the Commission's enforcement procedures. The Commission is proposing amendments to its compliance procedure regulations to implement the new program. Please note that the proposed rules that follow do not represent a final decision by the Commission on the issues presented by this rulemaking. Further information is provided in the supplementary information that follows.
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