Blood

blood
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
Health and Human Services Department -- Medical Devices; Hematology and Pathology Devices; Classification of Blood Establishment Computer Software and Accessories2018-May-182018-10610The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, Agency, or we) is issuing a final rule to classify blood establishment computer software (BECS) and BECS accessories (regulated under product code MMH) into class II (special controls). FDA has identified special controls for BECS and BECS accessories that are necessary to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness. FDA is also giving notice that the Agency does not intend to exempt BECS and BECS accessories from premarket notification requirements of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act).
Health and Human Services Department -- Medical Devices; Hematology and Pathology Devices; Classification of Lynch Syndrome Test Systems2018-Feb-272018-03924The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is classifying Lynch syndrome test systems into class II (special controls). The special controls that apply to the device type are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the Lynch syndrome test systems' classification. We are taking this action because we have determined that classifying the device into class II (special controls) will provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. We believe this action will also enhance patients' access to beneficial innovative devices, in part by reducing regulatory burdens.
Health and Human Services Department -- Medical Devices; Hematology and Pathology Devices; Classification of a Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Test System2018-Jan-032017-28342The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is classifying the cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) test system into class II (special controls). The special controls that apply to the device type are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the CIN test system's classification. We are taking this action because we have determined that classifying the device into class II (special controls) will provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. We believe this action will also enhance patients' access to beneficial innovative devices, in part by reducing regulatory burdens.
Health and Human Services Department -- Medical Devices; Hematology and Pathology Devices; Classification of the Whole Slide Imaging System2018-Jan-022017-28262The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is classifying the whole slide imaging system into class II (special controls). The special controls that apply to the device type are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the whole slide imaging system's classification. We are taking this action because we have determined that classifying the device into class II (special controls) will provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. We believe this action will also enhance patients' access to beneficial innovative devices, in part by reducing regulatory burdens.
Health and Human Services Department -- Medical Devices; Hematology and Pathology Devices; Classification of the Flow Cytometric Test System for Hematopoietic Neoplasms2017-Dec-272017-27855The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is classifying the flow cytometric test system for hematopoietic neoplasms into class II (special controls). The special controls that apply to the device type are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the flow cytometric test system for hematopoietic neoplasms' classification. We are taking this action because we have determined that classifying the device into class II (special controls) will provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. We believe this action will also enhance patients' access to beneficial innovative devices, in part by reducing regulatory burdens.
Health and Human Services Department -- Requirements for Foreign and Domestic Establishment Registration and Listing for Human Drugs, Including Drugs That Are Regulated Under a Biologics License Application, and Animal Drugs2016-Aug-312016-20471The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing drug establishment registration and drug listing. These amendments reorganize, modify, and clarify current regulations concerning who must register establishments and list human drugs, human drugs that are also biological products, and animal drugs. The final rule requires electronic submission, unless waived in certain circumstances, of registration and listing information. This rulemaking pertains to finished drug products and to active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) alone or together with one or more other ingredients. The final rule describes how and when owners or operators of establishments at which drugs are manufactured or processed must register their establishments with FDA and list the drugs they manufacture or process. In addition, the rule makes certain changes to the National Drug Code (NDC) system. We are taking this action to improve management of drug establishment registration and drug listing requirements and make these processes more efficient and effective for industry and for us. This action also supports implementation of the electronic prescribing provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) and the availability of current drug labeling information through DailyMed, a computerized repository of drug information maintained by the National Library of Medicine.
Health and Human Services Department -- Medical Devices; Hematology and Pathology Devices; Classification of Blood Establishment Computer Software and Accessories2016-Mar-012016-04411The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, Agency, or we) is proposing to classify the blood establishment computer software (BECS) and BECS accessories into class II (special controls). FDA is identifying proposed special controls for BECS and BECS accessories that are necessary to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness. FDA is also giving notice that the Agency does not intend to exempt BECS and BECS accessories from premarket notification requirements of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act). FDA is publishing in this document the recommendations of the Blood Product Advisory Committee regarding the classification of these devices. After considering public comments on the proposed classification, FDA will publish a final regulation classifying these device types.
Health and Human Services Department -- Hepatitis C Virus “Lookback” Requirements Based on Review of Historical Testing Records; Technical Amendment2015-Dec-282015-32477The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the biologics regulations by removing the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) ``lookback'' requirements regarding review of historical testing records. FDA is taking this action because the HCV ``lookback'' regulations based on review of historical testing records expired on August 24, 2015, due to the sunset provision provided under the regulation.
Health and Human Services Department -- Revocation of General Safety Test Regulations That Are Duplicative of Requirements in Biologics License Applications2015-Jul-022015-16366The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the biologics regulations by removing the general safety test (GST) requirements for biological products. FDA is finalizing this action because the existing codified GST regulations are duplicative of requirements that are also specified in biologics license applications (BLAs), or are no longer necessary or appropriate to help ensure the safety, purity, and potency of licensed biological products. FDA is taking this action as part of its retrospective review of its regulations to promote improvement and innovation, in response to the Executive order.
Health and Human Services Department -- Requirements for Blood and Blood Components Intended for Transfusion or for Further Manufacturing Use2015-May-222015-12228The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the regulations applicable to blood and blood components, including Source Plasma, to make the donor eligibility and testing requirements more consistent with current practices in the blood industry, to more closely align the regulations with current FDA recommendations, and to provide flexibility to accommodate advancing technology. In order to better assure the safety of the nation's blood supply and to help protect donor health, FDA is revising the requirements for blood establishments to test donors for infectious disease, and to determine that donors are eligible to donate and that donations are suitable for transfusion or further manufacture. FDA is also requiring establishments to evaluate donors for factors that may adversely affect the safety, purity, and potency of blood and blood components or the health of a donor during the donation process. Accordingly, these regulations establish requirements for donor education, donor history, and donor testing. These regulations also implement a flexible framework to help both FDA and industry to more effectively respond to new or emerging infectious agents that may affect blood product safety.
Health and Human Services Department -- Food and Drug Administration Regulations; Change of Addresses; Technical Amendment2015-Apr-032015-07268The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations to update address information for the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) as a result of the recent relocation of CBER offices and laboratories to the FDA White Oak campus in Silver Spring, MD, as well as make other related technical revisions. These changes are being made to ensure the accuracy of the Agency's regulations.
Health and Human Services Department -- Electronic Distribution of Prescribing Information for Human Prescription Drugs, Including Biological Products2014-Dec-182014-29522The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is proposing to amend its prescription drug and biological product labeling regulations to require electronic distribution of the prescribing information intended for health care professionals, which is currently distributed in paper form on or within the package from which a prescription drug or biological product is dispensed. FDA is also proposing that prescribing information intended for health care professionals will no longer be permitted to be distributed in paper form with the package from which a prescription drug or biological product is dispensed, except as provided by this regulation. We are proposing these actions to help ensure that the most current prescribing information is publicly accessible for the safe and effective use of human prescription drugs.
Health and Human Services Department -- Medical Devices; Hematology and Pathology Devices; Classification of Early Growth Response 1 Gene Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization Test System for Specimen Characterization2014-Sep-032014-20882The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying early growth response 1 (EGR1) gene fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) test system for specimen characterization into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to this device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the early growth response 1 (EGR1) gene fluorescence in-site hybridization (FISH) test system for specimen characterization classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.
Health and Human Services Department -- Medical Devices; Technical Amendment2014-Aug-252014-20107The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending certain medical device regulations to correct minor errors in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). This action is editorial in nature and is intended to correct outdated Web site addresses.
Health and Human Services Department -- Revocation of General Safety Test Regulations That Are Duplicative of Requirements in Biological License Applications2014-Aug-222014-19888The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to amend the biologics regulations by removing the general safety test (GST) requirements for biological products. FDA is proposing this action because the existing codified GST regulations are duplicative of requirements that are also specified in biologics licenses, or are no longer necessary or appropriate to help ensure the safety, purity, and potency of licensed biological products. FDA is taking this action as part of its retrospective review of its regulations to promote improvement and innovation, in response to an Executive order.
Health and Human Services Department -- Medical Devices; Technical Amendment2013-Mar-262013-06826The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending certain medical device regulations to correct minor errors in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). This action is editorial in nature and is intended to provide accuracy and clarity to the Agency's regulations.
Health and Human Services Department -- Amendments to Sterility Test Requirements for Biological Products2012-May-032012-10649The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the sterility test requirements for biological products. This rule provides manufacturers of biological products greater flexibility, as appropriate, and encourages use of the most appropriate and state-of- the-art test methods for assuring the safety of biological products. FDA is taking this action as part of its ongoing efforts to comprehensively review and, as necessary, revise its regulations related to biological products.
Health and Human Services Department -- Revisions to Labeling Requirements for Blood and Blood Components, Including Source Plasma2012-Jan-032011-33554The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is revising the labeling requirements for blood and blood components intended for use in transfusion or for further manufacture by combining, simplifying, and updating specific regulations applicable to labeling and circulars of information. These requirements will facilitate the use of a labeling system using machine-readable information that would be acceptable as a replacement for the ``ABC Codabar'' system for the labeling of blood and blood components. FDA is taking this action as a part of its efforts to comprehensively review and, as necessary, revise its regulations, policies, guidances, and procedures related to the regulation of blood and blood components. This final rule is intended to help ensure the continued safety of the blood supply and facilitate consistency in labeling.
Health and Human Services Department -- Amendments to Sterility Test Requirements for Biological Products2011-Jun-212011-15346The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposes to amend the sterility test requirements for biological products. This proposed rule is intended to provide manufacturers of biological products greater flexibility and to encourage use of the most appropriate and state-of- the-art test methods for assuring the safety of biological products. We are taking this action as part of our continuing effort to review and, as necessary, update the biologics regulations.
Labor Department -- Hazard Communication2009-Sep-309-22483OSHA is proposing to modify its existing Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) to conform with the United Nations' (UN) Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). OSHA has made a preliminary determination that the proposed modifications will improve the quality and consistency of information provided to employers and employees regarding chemical hazards and associated protective measures. The Agency anticipates this improved information will enhance the effectiveness of the HCS in ensuring that employees are apprised of the chemical hazards to which they may be exposed, and in reducing the incidence of chemical-related occupational illnesses and injuries. The proposed modifications to the standard include revised criteria for classification of chemical hazards; revised labeling provisions that include requirements for use of standardized signal words, pictograms, hazard statements, and precautionary statements; a specified format for safety data sheets; and related revisions to definitions of terms used in the standard, requirements for employee training on labels and safety data sheets. OSHA is also proposing to modify provisions of a number of other standards, including standards for flammable and combustible liquids, process safety management, and most substance-specific health standards, to ensure consistency with the modified HCS requirements.
Health and Human Services Department -- Requirements for Human Blood and Blood Components Intended for Transfusion or for Further Manufacturing Use2007-Nov-087-21565The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposes to revise and update the regulations applicable to blood and blood components, including Source Plasma and Source Leukocytes, to add donor requirements that are consistent with current practices in the blood industry, and to more closely align the regulations with current FDA recommendations. FDA is taking this action to help ensure the safety of the national blood supply and to help protect donor health by requiring establishments to evaluate donors for factors that may adversely affect the safety, purity, and potency of blood and blood components or the health of a donor during the donation process.
Health and Human Services Department -- Current Good Manufacturing Practice for Blood and Blood Components; Notification of Consignees and Transfusion Recipients Receiving Blood and Blood Components at Increased Risk of Transmitting Hepatitis C Virus Infection (“Lookback”)2007-Aug-247-16607The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requiring establishments collecting Whole Blood or blood components, including Source Plasma and Source Leukocytes, to establish, maintain, and follow an appropriate system for identifying blood and blood components previously donated by a donor who tests reactive for evidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection on a subsequent donation identified either by current testing or after a review of historical testing records, or when the collecting establishment is made aware of other reliable test results or information indicating evidence of HCV infection. Such collections may be at increased risk of transmitting HCV infection. FDA is requiring collecting establishments to quarantine prior in-date blood and blood components from such a donor, to notify consignees of prior in-date blood and blood components from such a donor for quarantine purposes, and to perform further testing on the donor. FDA is also requiring consignees to notify transfusion recipients of blood and blood components from such a donor, as appropriate. In addition, FDA is revising the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) ``lookback'' requirements for greater consistency with the HCV ``lookback'' requirements, and extending the record retention period to 10 years. FDA is taking this action to help ensure the continued safety of the blood supply and to help ensure that information is provided to recipients of blood and blood components that may have been at increased risk of transmitting HIV or HCV infection. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of a guidance document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: `Lookback' for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV): Product Quarantine, Consignee Notification, Further Testing, Product Disposition, and Notification of Transfusion Recipients Based on Donor Test Results Indicating Infection with HCV'' (the ``lookback'' guidance). We are also issuing this final rule in conjunction with a companion interim final rule published by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register.
Health and Human Services Department -- Revisions to the Requirements Applicable to Blood, Blood Components, and Source Plasma; Companion Document to Direct Final Rule2007-Aug-167-15942The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to amend the biologics regulations by removing, revising, or updating specific regulations applicable to blood, blood components, and Source Plasma to be more consistent with current practices in the blood industry and to remove unnecessary or outdated requirements. We are taking this action as part of our continuing effort to reduce the burden of unnecessary regulations on industry and to revise outdated regulations without diminishing public health protection. This proposed rule is a companion to the direct final rule published elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register.
Health and Human Services Department -- Safety Reporting Requirements for Human Drug and Biological Products2003-Mar-1403-5204The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to amend its pre- and postmarketing safety reporting regulations for human drug and biological products to implement definitions and reporting formats and standards recommended by the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) and by the World Health Organization's (WHO's) Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS); codify the agency's expectations for timely acquisition, evaluation, and submission of relevant safety information for marketed drugs and licensed biological products; require that certain information, such as domestic reports of medication errors, be submitted to the agency in an expedited manner; clarify certain requirements; and make other minor revisions. FDA is also proposing to amend its postmarketing annual reporting regulations for human drug and licensed biological products by revising the content for these reports. FDA is taking this action to strengthen its ability to monitor the safety of human drugs and biological products. The intended effect of these changes is to further worldwide consistency in the collection of safety information and submission of safety reports, increase the quality of safety reports, expedite FDA's review of critical safety information, and enable the agency to protect and promote public health. These proposed changes would be an important step toward global harmonization of safety reporting requirements and additional efforts are underway within the Department of Health and Human Services to harmonize the reporting requirements of U.S. Federal agencies (e.g., FDA and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) are continuing to work together to address the best ways to streamline information sharing and harmonize, to the extent possible, the safety reporting requirements of the two agencies).
Health and Human Services Department -- Hematology and Pathology Devices; Reclassification of the Automated Differential Cell Counter2002-Jan-1402-792The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reclassifying the automated differential cell counter (ADCC) from class III (premarket approval) into class II (special controls). FDA is also identifying the guidance document entitled ``Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Premarket Notifications for Automated Differential Cell Counters for Immature or Abnormal Blood Cells; Final Guidance for Industry and FDA'' as the special control that the agency believes will reasonably ensure the safety and effectiveness of the device. This reclassification is being undertaken based on new information submitted in a reclassification petition from the International Society for Laboratory Hematology (ISLH), under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 and the FDA Modernization Act of 1997.
Health and Human Services Department -- Requirements for Testing Human Blood Donors for Evidence of Infection Due to Communicable Disease Agents2001-Jun-1101-14408The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is revising the general biological product standards applicable to human blood and blood components by updating the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing requirements, by adding testing requirements for hepatitis C virus (HCV), human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV), and by adding requirements for supplemental (i.e., additional, more specific) testing approved for such use by FDA when a donation is found to be reactive for any of the required screening tests for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents. The agency also is requiring manufacturers of certain test kits to use reference panels, when available, to verify the acceptable sensitivity and specificity of each lot. This final rule is intended to help protect the safety and ensure the quality of the Nation's blood supply, to enhance the safety of medical devices containing blood or blood components, to provide FDA with clear enforcement authority, and to promote consistency in the industry. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is publishing a rule requiring blood and plasma establishments to notify donors, including autologous donors, whenever the donor is deferred or determined not to be suitable for current or future donations of blood and blood components.
Labor Department -- Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens; Needlestick and Other Sharps Injuries; Final Rule2001-Jan-1801-1207The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is revising the Bloodborne Pathogens standard in conformance with the requirements of the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act. This Act directs OSHA to revise the Bloodborne Pathogens standard to include new examples in the definition of engineering controls along with two new definitions; to require that Exposure Control Plans reflect how employers implement new developments in control technology; to require employers to solicit input from employees responsible for direct patient care in the identification, evaluation, and selection of engineering and work practice controls; and to require certain employers to establish and maintain a log of percutaneous injuries from contaminated sharps.
Health and Human Services Department -- Revisions to the Requirements Applicable to Blood, Blood Components, and Source Plasma; Confirmation in Part and Technical Amendment2001-Jan-1001-533The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is confirming in part the direct final rule issued in the Federal Register of August 19, 1999. The direct final rule amends the biologics regulations by removing, revising, or updating specific regulations applicable to blood, blood components, and Source Plasma to be more consistent with current practices in the blood industry and to remove unnecessary or outdated requirements. FDA is confirming the provisions for which no significant adverse comments were received. The agency received significant adverse comments on certain provisions and is amending Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations to reinstate the former provisions.
Health and Human Services Department -- Current Good Manufacturing Practice for Blood and Blood Components; Notification of Consignees and Transfusion Recipients Receiving Blood and Blood Components at Increased Risk of Transmitting HCV Infection (“Lookback”)2000-Nov-1600-28907The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to amend the biologics regulations to require that blood establishments (including plasma establishments) prepare and follow written procedures for appropriate action when it is determined that blood and blood components at increased risk of transmitting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have been collected from a donor who tested repeatedly reactive for evidence of HCV infection at a later date. This proposed rule would require blood establishments to quarantine prior collections from such a donor, perform further testing on the donor, and notify transfusion recipients, as appropriate, when such a donor is identified at the time of a repeat donation or after performing a review of historical testing records to identify donations at increased risk of transmitting HCV. In addition, FDA is proposing to extend the record retention period to 10 years to create opportunities for disease prevention many years after recipient exposure to such a donor. This action is taken as part of FDA's ``Blood Initiative'' to comprehensively review and, as necessary, revise its regulations, policies, guidances, and procedures related to the licensing and regulation of blood products. This proposed rule is intended to help ensure the continued safety of the blood supply and to help ensure that information is provided to consignees and to prior recipients of blood and blood components from a donor whose subsequent donation tests positive for antibody to HCV or otherwise is determined to have been at increased risk of transmitting HCV.
Health and Human Services Department -- Revision of Requirements Applicable to Albumin (Human), Plasma Protein Fraction (Human), and Immune Globulin (Human)2000-Aug-2800-21897The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the biologics regulations by removing, revising, or updating specific regulations applicable to blood derivative products to be more consistent with current practices and to remove unnecessary or outdated requirements. FDA is taking this action as part of the agency's ``Blood Initiative'' in which FDA is reviewing and revising, when appropriate, its regulations, policies, guidance, and procedures related to blood products, including blood derivatives.
Health and Human Services Department -- Hematology and Pathology Devices; Reclassification; Restricted Devices; OTC Test Sample Collection Systems for Drugs of Abuse Testing2000-Apr-0700-8598The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reclassifying over- the-counter (OTC) test sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing from class III (premarket approval) into class I (general controls) and exempting them from premarket notification (510(k)) and current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) requirements. FDA is also designating OTC test sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing as restricted devices under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) and establishing restrictions intended to assure consumers that: The underlying laboratory test(s) are accurate and reliable; the laboratory performing the test(s) has adequate expertise and competency; and the product has adequate labeling and methods of communicating test results to consumers. Finally, FDA is adding a conforming amendment to the existing classification regulation for specimen transport and storage containers to clarify that it does not apply to specimen transport and storage containers that are part of an OTC test sample collection system for the purpose of testing for the presence of drugs of abuse or their metabolites in a laboratory.
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