Bees

bees
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
Agriculture Department -- Use of Electronic Information Exchange Systems; Miscellaneous Amendments2016-Jun-212016-14616We are amending our regulations regarding the importation or exportation of animals and animal products and plants and plant products to address instances where the current regulations require the use of a hard-copy form or specify that a particular document must be submitted in writing. This final rule amends the regulations to provide the flexibility needed for persons to take advantage of electronic systems when a regulation has a limiting requirement. The amendments we are making in this final rule are not to mandate the use of electronic systems or preclude the use of paper documents; rather, they address those instances where our regulations specify a submission method to the exclusion of other methods.
Agriculture Department -- Consolidation of Permit Procedures; Denial and Revocation of Permits2014-Apr-102014-08095We are consolidating the regulations concerning the issuance of permits for the importation and interstate movement of a wide variety of regulated plants, plant products, and other articles. We are also making corresponding changes to the regulations concerning permits for the importation and interstate movement of noxious weeds and the importation of honeybees and other beekeeping articles. The regulations will also include new provisions for the denial of a permit and the revocation of a permit once issued. These changes will make our permit procedures more transparent and easier to use, allow us to evaluate a permit application more quickly and thoroughly, and help us hold permittees accountable for complying with permit conditions.
Agriculture Department -- Consolidation of Permit Procedures; Denial and Revocation of Permits2013-Jun-212013-14638We are proposing to consolidate the regulations concerning the issuance of permits for the importation and interstate movement of a wide variety of regulated plants, plant products, and other articles. We would also make corresponding changes to the regulations concerning permits for the importation and interstate movement of noxious weeds and the importation of honeybees and other beekeeping articles. We are also proposing to include new provisions in our regulations for the denial of a permit and the revocation of a permit once issued. These changes would make our permit procedures more transparent and easier to use, allow us to evaluate a permit application more quickly and thoroughly, and help us hold permittees accountable for complying with permit conditions.
Agriculture Department -- Noxious Weed Control and Eradication Act; Revisions to Authority Citations2005-Oct-0505-19945We are amending the authority citations in title 7, chapter III, and title 9, part 94, to reflect the enactment of the Noxious Weed Control and Eradication Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-412, 118 Stat. 2320, 7 U.S.C. 7781-7786), which amended the Plant Protection Act.
Agriculture Department -- Phytosanitary Treatments; Location of Treatment Schedules and Other Requirements2005-Jun-0705-9387This final rule amends the plant health regulations by adding to 7 CFR part 305 treatment schedules and related requirements that now appear in the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual and by removing the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual from the list of material that is incorporated by reference into the regulations. We are taking this action to simplify the process for amending treatment schedules and related requirements and to more clearly distinguish between treatment-related requirements and nonbinding administrative information, which the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual also contains.
Agriculture Department -- Requirements for Requests To Amend Import Regulations2004-Oct-2804-24150We are proposing to establish regulations governing the submission of requests for changes in our regulations that restrict the importation of plants, plant parts, and plant products. We are proposing this action because, despite existing non-regulatory guidance on the submission of requests, few applicants provide the basic information we require to properly consider their requests. We expect that adoption of this proposal would help ensure that we are provided with the information we need to prepare a risk analysis and/or other analyses that evaluate the risks and other effects associated with the proposed change to the regulations. This information is needed for us to effectively consider the request, and submission of the information at the time the request is made allows us to proceed with our consideration of the request in a timely manner.
Agriculture Department -- Bees and Related Articles2004-Oct-2104-23416We are amending the regulations for the importation of honeybees and honeybee semen and the regulations governing the importation of bees other than honeybees, certain beekeeping byproducts, and used beekeeping equipment. Among other things, we are allowing honeybees from Australia and honeybees and honeybee germ plasm from New Zealand to be imported into the continental United States under certain conditions, imposing certain conditions on the importation into the United States of bees and related articles from Canada, and prohibiting both the interstate movement and importation of honeybees into Hawaii. This action also consolidates all of our regulations concerning all bees in the superfamily Apoidea. These changes are intended to make these regulations more consistent with international standards, update them to reflect current research and terminology, and simplify them and make them more useful.
Agriculture Department -- Pine Shoot Beetle Host Material From Canada2004-Oct-2004-22220We are establishing restrictions on the importation of pine shoot beetle host material into the United States from Canada. Under the new regulations, pine nursery stock, as well as pine products that consist of pine bark or have pine bark attached, must meet certain requirements relating to documentation, treatment, handling, and utilization as a condition of importation into the United States from Canada. This action is necessary on an emergency basis to help prevent the introduction and spread of pine shoot beetle, a pest of pine trees, into noninfested areas of the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Wood Packaging Material2004-Sep-1604-20763We are amending the regulations for the importation of unmanufactured wood articles to adopt an international standard entitled ``Guidelines for Regulating Wood Packaging Material in International Trade'' that was approved by the Interim Commission on Phytosanitary Measures of the International Plant Protection Convention on March 15, 2002. The standard calls for wood packaging material to be either heat treated or fumigated with methyl bromide, in accordance with the Guidelines, and marked with an approved international mark certifying treatment. This change will affect all persons using wood packaging material in connection with importing goods into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Unmanufactured Wood Articles From Mexico2004-Aug-2604-19519We are amending the regulations to add restrictions on the importation of pine and fir logs and lumber, as well as other unmanufactured wood articles, from Mexican States adjacent to the United States/Mexico border. This rule requires that these wood articles meet certain treatment and handling requirements to be eligible for importation into the United States. This action is necessary to prevent the introduction into the United States of plant pests, including forest pests, with unmanufactured wood articles from Mexico.
Agriculture Department -- Mexican Hass Avocado Import Program2004-May-2404-11709We are proposing to amend the regulations governing the importation of fruits and vegetables to expand the number of States in which fresh Hass avocado fruit grown in approved orchards in approved municipalities in Michoacan, Mexico, may be distributed. We are also proposing to allow the distribution of the avocados during all months of the year. To reflect these proposed changes, we would also make other changes in the regulations, such as removing restrictions on the ports through which the avocados may enter the United States and the corridor through which the avocados must transit the United States. We are proposing this action in response to a request from the Government of Mexico and based on our finding that the phytosanitary measures described in this proposed rule will reduce the risk of introducing plant pests associated with Mexican Hass avocados into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Orchids of the Genus Phalaenopsis2004-May-0504-10067We are amending the regulations governing the importation of plants and plant products to add orchids of the genus Phalaenopsis from Taiwan to the list of plants that may be imported in an approved growing medium subject to specified growing, inspection, and certification requirements. We are taking this action in response to a request by Taiwan and after determining that Phalaenopsis spp. plants established in growing media can be imported without resulting in the introduction into the United States or the dissemination within the United States of a plant pest or noxious weed.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Small Lots of Seed Without Phytosanitary Certificates2004-Apr-2904-9716We are proposing to amend the nursery stock regulations to allow the importation of small lots of seed under an import permit with specific conditions, as an alternative to the current phytosanitary certificate requirement. This proposed change is necessary because several entities that import small lots of seed-individual importers, horticultural societies, arboreta, and small businesses--have had difficulty obtaining the necessary certificates and have been adversely affected by the phytosanitary certificate requirement. The proposed change would make it feasible for those entities to import small lots of seed and would ensure prompt and consistent service for such importers while continuing to protect against the introduction of plant pests into the United States and providing the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service with necessary information about the quality, quantity, and diversity of the imported material.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Clementines, Mandarins, and Tangerines From Chile2004-Mar-2204-6325We are proposing to amend the fruits and vegetables regulations to allow the importation, under certain conditions, of clementines, mandarins, and tangerines from Chile into the United States. Based on the evidence in a recent pest risk assessment and an accompanying risk management document, we believe these articles can be safely imported from all provinces of Chile, provided certain conditions are met. This action would provide for the importation of clementines, mandarins, and tangerines from Chile into the United States while continuing to protect the United States against the introduction of plant pests.
Agriculture Department -- Karnal Bunt; Revision of Regulations for Importing Wheat2004-Mar-0304-4723We are proposing to amend our regulations regarding the importation of wheat from regions affected with Karnal bunt. Our proposed amendments would, among other things, list such regions, as well as articles that would be regulated for Karnal bunt; increase the flexibility of the regulations so that they could provide more readily for the recognition of areas where Karnal bunt is not known to occur within regions where Karnal bunt is known to be present; describe conditions, including requirements for phytosanitary certificates, under which wheat and related articles from regions affected with Karnal bunt could be imported into the United States; and specify cleaning and/or disinfection requirements for imported farm machinery and other equipment used to handle or store Karnal bunt-positive seed or host crops. The proposed changes would make our regulations regarding the importation of wheat and related articles from regions affected with Karnal bunt substantively equivalent to our domestic Karnal bunt regulations and would bring the former into compliance with international agreements to which the United States is a party.
Agriculture Department -- Unshu Oranges from Honshu Island, Japan2004-Mar-0204-4600We are adopting as a final rule, with two changes, an interim rule that amended the regulations governing the importation of citrus fruit to allow Unshu oranges grown on Honshu Island, Japan, to be imported without fumigation if the distribution of the fruit within the United States is limited to States that are not commercial citrus- producing States. We will continue to require fumigation if the fruit is distributed to commercial citrus-producing States. This final rule amends the regulations to include a reference to the island of Shikoku, along with the islands of Honshu and Kyushu, as an island from which Unshu oranges may be exported to the United States in accordance with the requirements of the regulations.
Agriculture Department -- Cold Treatment of Fruits2004-Feb-0204-2023We are adopting as a final rule, without change, an interim rule that amended the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference into the Code of Federal Regulations, by revising the cold treatment schedules under which fruits are treated for the Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly) and other specified pests. Based on a review of those treatment schedules, we determined that it was necessary to extend the duration of cold treatment for Medfly. We also amended the regulations for importing fruits and vegetables to provide that inspectors at the port of first arrival will sample and cut fruit from each shipment cold treated for Medfly to monitor the effectiveness of the cold treatment. The interim rule was necessary to protect against the introduction and dissemination of Medflies into and within the contiguous United States.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Artificially Dwarfed Plants in Growing Media from the People's Republic of China2004-Jan-1604-1066We are amending the regulations governing the importation of plants and plant products to add artificially dwarfed (penjing) plants of the species Buxus sinica, Ehretia microphylla, Podocarpus macrophyllus, Sageretia thea, and Serissa foetida from the People's Republic of China to the list of plants that may be imported in an approved growing medium subject to specified growing, inspection, and certification requirements. We are taking this action in response to a request by the Government of China and after determining that the penjing plants established in growing media can be imported without resulting in the introduction into the United States or the dissemination within the United States of a plant pest or noxious weed. This rule will relieve restrictions that currently allow these species to be imported only as bare-rooted plants.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Eucalyptus Logs, Lumber, and Wood Chips From South America2004-Jan-1504-875We are amending the regulations that govern the importation of logs, lumber, and other unmanufactured wood articles into the United States to allow wood chips derived from temperate species of Eucalyptus from South America to be treated with a surface pesticide prior to importation as an alternative to the existing treatments. This final rule follows a proposed rule that proposed to amend the regulations to require that logs, lumber, and wood chips of tropical species of Eucalyptus from South America be subject to more restrictive entry requirements, including treatment with fumigation with methyl bromide or heat treatment, than those currently in the regulations. In that proposed rule, we also proposed to allow wood chips derived from both tropical and temperate species of Eucalyptus from South America to be treated with a surface pesticide prior to importation. Although the more restrictive entry requirements for logs, lumber, and wood chips of tropical species of Eucalyptus are still under consideration, this action to allow wood chips of temperate species of Eucalyptus to be treated with a surface pesticide is necessary to provide an effective alternative treatment to the domestic wood pulp industry, which is interested in importing temperate wood chips of Eucalyptus from South America, while continuing to protect the United States against the introduction of plant pests.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Fruits and Vegetables2003-Dec-1803-31202We propose to amend the fruits and vegetables regulations to list a number of fruits and vegetables from certain parts of the world as eligible, under specified conditions, for importation into the United States. All of the fruits and vegetables, as a condition of entry, would be inspected and subject to treatment at the port of first arrival as may be required by an inspector. In addition, some of the fruits and vegetables would be required to meet other special conditions. We also propose to recognize areas in Peru as free from the South American cucurbit fly. These actions would provide the United States with additional types and sources of fruits and vegetables while continuing to protect against the introduction of quarantine pests through imported fruits and vegetables.
Agriculture Department -- Ports of Entry for Certain Plants and Plant Products2003-Dec-1803-31203We are amending the regulations governing the importation of nursery stock and other articles by designating the ports of Atlanta, Georgia, and Agana, Guam, as plant inspection stations. The addition of the two plant inspection stations will help reduce transportation time and costs to importers who must currently import plants through inspection stations that are considerably distant from the importers' facilities.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Eucalyptus Logs, Lumber, and Wood Chips From South America2003-Sep-1503-23432We are proposing to amend the regulations that govern the importation of logs, lumber, and other unmanufactured wood articles into the United States to require that logs and lumber of tropical species of Eucalyptus from South America be fumigated with methyl bromide or heat treated prior to importation and that wood chips of tropical species of Eucalyptus from South America be fumigated with methyl bromide, heat treated, or heat treated with moisture reduction prior to importation. We are also proposing to allow wood chips derived from both tropical and temperate species of Eucalyptus from South America to be treated with a surface pesticide. These proposed changes are necessary in order to prevent the introduction of plant pests into the United States through the importation of eucalyptus logs, lumber, and wood chips from South America.
Agriculture Department -- Update of Nursery Stock Regulations2003-Aug-2003-21304We are amending the regulations for importing nursery stock to require additional certifications for imported niger seed and lilac, to reflect changes in plant taxonomy and pest distributions, and to make various changes to the requirements for postentry quarantine of imported plants. We are also making several other changes to update and clarify the regulations and improve their effectiveness. This action is necessary to update the existing regulations and make them easier to understand and implement.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Fruits and Vegetables2003-Jun-2503-15908We are amending the fruits and vegetables regulations to list a number of fruits and vegetables from certain parts of the world as eligible, under specified conditions, for importation into the United States. All of the fruits and vegetables, as a condition of entry, will be inspected and subject to treatment at the port of first arrival as may be required by an inspector. In addition, some of the fruits and vegetables will be required to be treated or meet other special conditions. This action will provide the United States with additional types and sources of fruits and vegetables while continuing to protect against the introduction of quarantine pests through imported fruits and vegetables. We are also recognizing areas in several countries as free from certain fruit flies; amending the packing requirements for certain commodities; expanding locations in the northeastern United States where cold treatment can be conducted; updating and clarifying restrictions on the entry of fruits and vegetables; updating and clarifying permit procedures, including amendment, denial, or withdrawal of permits; requiring full disclosure of fruits and vegetables at the port of first arrival and clarifying the conditions under which they may be released for movement; and making other miscellaneous changes.
Agriculture Department -- Removal of Cold Treatment Requirement for Ya Pears Imported From Hebei Province in China2003-Jun-1003-14551We are removing the cold treatment requirement for Ya pears imported from Hebei Province in the People's Republic of China. The cold treatment requirement had been imposed to ensure that Ya pears did not introduce the Oriental fruit fly into the United States. The People's Republic of China has submitted data indicating that no Oriental fruit flies have been found in Hebei Province since the beginning of 1997 and has requested that we remove the cold treatment requirement. This action will remove a restriction that no longer appears necessary.
Agriculture Department -- Additional Declaration for Imported Articles of Pelargonium2003-May-2303-12988We are amending the regulations to require that an additional declaration appear on the phytosanitary certificate that must accompany all articles of Pelargonium spp. and Solanum spp. imported into the United States, except those imported under the Canadian greenhouse- grown restricted plant program. The additional declaration must state either that the articles of Pelargonium spp. and Solanum spp. were produced in a production facility that has been tested and found to be free of Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 or that Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 is not known to occur in the region in which the articles were produced. We have recently discovered that articles of Pelargonium spp. and Solanum spp. imported into the United States pose a risk of carrying this bacterial strain, which causes potato brown rot. This action is necessary to prevent the introduction of this bacterial strain into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Fragrant Pears From China2003-May-2303-12987We are proposing to amend the fruits and vegetables regulations to allow the importation of fragrant pears from China under certain conditions. As a condition of entry, fragrant pears from China would have to be grown in the Korla region of Xinjiang Province in a production site that is registered with the national plant protection organization of China. The fragrant pears would be subject to inspection. In addition, the pears would have to be packed in insect- proof containers that are labeled in accordance with the regulations and safeguarded from pest infestation during transport to the United States. This action would allow fragrant pears to be imported from China while continuing to provide protection against the introduction of plant pests into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Movement and Importation of Fruits and Vegetables2003-May-2303-12984We are adopting as a final rule, without change, an interim rule that amended the regulations that govern the movement of fruits and vegetables from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands to require the treatment of pigeon peas (fresh shelled or in the pod) from Puerto Rico for movement into any other area of the United States. In addition, we amended the regulations that govern the importation of fruits and vegetables to require the treatment of pigeon peas (fresh shelled or in the pod) from the Dominican Republic imported into any area of the United States except Puerto Rico, and to prohibit the importation of mangoes from the British Virgin Islands into the U.S. Virgin Islands. These actions were necessary to prevent the introduction and dissemination of plant pests that are new to or not widely distributed within the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Solid Wood Packing Material2003-May-2003-12503We are proposing to amend the regulations for the importation of unmanufactured wood articles to adopt an international standard entitled ``Guidelines for Regulating Wood Packaging Material in International Trade'' that was approved by the Interim Commission on Phytosanitary Measures of the International Plant Protection Convention on March 15, 2002. The standard calls for wood packaging material to be either heat treated or fumigated with methyl bromide, in accordance with the Guidelines, and marked with an approved international mark certifying treatment. We propose to adopt the IPPC Guidelines because they represent the current international standard determined to be necessary and effective for controlling pests in wood packaging material used in global trade, and because current United States requirements for wood packaging material are not fully effective, as shown by analyses of pest interceptions at ports that show an increase in pests associated with wood packaging material. This increase in pests was found in wood packaging material that does not meet the IPPC Guidelines (e.g., wood packaging material from everywhere except China, which must already be treated due to past pest interceptions). There has been a decrease in pests associated with wood packaging material from China since we began requiring that material be treated prior to importation. This change would affect all persons using wood packaging material in connection with importing goods into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Unshu Oranges From Honshu Island, Japan2003-Mar-0303-4875We are amending the regulations governing the importation of citrus fruit to allow Unshu oranges grown on Honshu Island, Japan, to be imported without fumigation if the distribution of the fruit within the United States is limited to non-citrus-producing States. We will continue to require fumigation if the fruit is distributed to citrus- producing States. This action is warranted to relieve a restriction that is not needed to mitigate pest risk.
Agriculture Department -- Cold Treatment for Fresh Fruits; Port of Corpus Christi, TX2003-Jan-2103-1212We are amending the regulations to allow, under certain conditions, the cold treatment of imported fruit upon arrival at the maritime port of Corpus Christi, TX. We have determined that there are biological barriers at this port that, along with certain safeguards, would prevent the introduction of fruit flies and other insect pests into the United States in the unlikely event that they escape from shipments of fruit before the fruit undergoes cold treatment. This action will facilitate the importation of fruit requiring cold treatment while continuing to provide protection against fruit flies and other insect pests into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Movement and Importation of Fruits and Vegetables2003-Jan-2103-1211We are amending the regulations that govern the movement of fruits and vegetables from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands to require the treatment of pigeon peas (fresh shelled or in the pod) from Puerto Rico for movement into any other area of the United States. In addition, we are amending the regulations to require the treatment of pigeon peas (fresh shelled or in the pod) from the Dominican Republic for importation into any area of the United States except Puerto Rico, and to prohibit the importation of mangoes from the British Virgin Islands into the U.S. Virgin Islands. These actions are necessary to prevent the introduction and dissemination of plant pests that are new to or not widely distributed within the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Removal of Cold Treatment Requirement for Ya Pears Imported From Hebei Province in China2002-Dec-2002-32056We are proposing to remove the current cold treatment requirement for Ya pears imported from Hebei Province in the People's Republic of China. The cold treatment requirement was imposed to ensure that Ya pears did not introduce the Oriental fruit fly into the United States. The People's Republic of China has submitted data indicating that no Oriental fruit flies have been found in Hebei Province since the beginning of 1997 and has requested that we remove the cold treatment requirement. Removing the cold treatment requirement would lift a restriction that no longer appears necessary.
Agriculture Department -- Irradiation Phytosanitary Treatment of Imported Fruits and Vegetables2002-Oct-2302-27027We are establishing regulations providing for use of irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment for fruits and vegetables imported into the United States. The irradiation treatment provides protection against fruit flies and the mango seed weevil. This action provides an alternative to other currently approved treatments (various fumigation, cold, and heat treatments, and systems approaches employing techniques such as greenhouse growing) against fruit flies and the mango seed weevil in fruits and vegetables.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Clementines From Spain2002-Oct-2102-26668We are amending the fruits and vegetables regulations to allow the importation of clementines from Spain to resume if the clementines are cold treated en route to the United States, and provided that other pre-treatment and post-treatment requirements are met. These requirements include provisions that the clementines be grown in accordance with a Mediterranean fruit fly management program established by the Government of Spain, that the clementines be subject to an inspection regimen that includes fruit cutting prior to, and after, cold treatment, and that the clementines meet other conditions designed to protect against the introduction of the Mediterranean fruit fly into the United States. This final rule also includes restrictions on the distribution of imported Spanish clementines for the 2002-2003 shipping season. We are taking this action based on our finding that the restrictions described in this final rule will reduce the risk of introduction of Mediterranean fruit fly associated with the importation of clementines from Spain.
Agriculture Department -- Cold Treatment of Fruits2002-Oct-1502-26063We are amending the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference into the Code of Federal Regulations, by revising the cold treatment schedules under which fruits are treated for the Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly) and other specified pests. Based on a review of those treatment schedules, we have determined that it is necessary to extend the duration of cold treatment for Medfly. We are also amending the regulations for importing fruits and vegetables to provide that inspectors at the port of first arrival will sample and cut fruit from each shipment cold treated for Medfly to monitor the effectiveness of the cold treatment. These actions are necessary to protect against the introduction and dissemination of Medflies into and within the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Fruits and Vegetables2002-Oct-0102-24847We propose to amend the fruits and vegetables regulations to list a number of fruits and vegetables from certain parts of the world as eligible, under specified conditions, for importation into the United States. All of the fruits and vegetables, as a condition of entry, would be inspected and subject to treatment at the port of first arrival as may be required by a U.S. Department of Agriculture inspector. In addition, some of the fruits and vegetables would be required to be treated or meet other special conditions. This action would provide the United States with additional types and sources of fruits and vegetables while continuing to protect against the introduction of quarantine pests through imported fruits and vegetables. We are also proposing to recognize areas in several countries as free from certain fruit flies; amend the packing requirements for certain commodities; expand locations in the northeastern United States where cold treatment can be conducted; update and clarify restrictions on the entry of fruits and vegetables; update and clarify permit procedures, including amendment, denial, or withdrawal of permits; require full disclosure of fruits and vegetables at the port of first arrival and clarify the conditions under which they may be released for movement; and make other miscellaneous changes.
Agriculture Department -- Gypsy Moth Host Material From Canada; Removal of Infested Areas in British Columbia, Canada2002-Sep-2302-24102We are amending the regulations concerning gypsy moth host material from Canada by removing the areas in British Columbia from the list of gypsy moth infested areas. Surveys have shown that those areas in British Columbia have been free of gypsy moth for the past 2 years. This action removes restrictions on the importation of regulated articles from British Columbia that are no longer necessary.
Agriculture Department -- Bees and Related Articles2002-Aug-1902-20941We are proposing to amend the regulations for the importation of honeybees and honeybee semen and the regulations established to prevent the introduction of exotic bee diseases and parasites through the importation of bees other than honeybees, certain beekeeping byproducts, and used beekeeping equipment. Among other things, our proposal would allow honeybees from Australia and honeybees and honeybee germ plasm from New Zealand to be imported into the United States under certain conditions, impose certain conditions on the importation into the United States of bees and related articles from Canada, and prohibit the interstate movement of honeybees into Hawaii. It also would consolidate all of our regulations concerning bees. These changes would make these regulations more consistent with international standards, update them to reflect current research and terminology, and simplify them and make them more useful.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Artificially Dwarfed Plants2002-Aug-1902-20940We are amending the regulations for importing plants and plant products by requiring artificially dwarfed plants that are imported into the United States to have been grown under certain conditions in greenhouses or screenhouses within nurseries registered with the government of the country where the plants were grown. This action is necessary to protect against the introduction of longhorned beetles into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Clementines From Spain2002-Jul-1102-17431We are proposing to amend the fruits and vegetables regulations to allow the importation of clementines from Spain to resume if the clementines are cold treated en route to the United States, and provided that other pre-treatment and post-treatment requirements are met. These requirements would include provisions that the clementines be grown in accordance with a Mediterranean fruit fly management program established by the Government of Spain, that the clementines be subject to an inspection regimen that includes fruit cutting prior to, and after, cold treatment, and that the clementines meet other conditions designed to protect against the introduction of the Mediterranean fruit fly into the United States. We are proposing this action based on our finding that the restrictions described in this proposed rule will reduce the risk of introduction of Mediterranean fruit fly and other plant pests associated with the importation of clementines from Spain.
Agriculture Department -- Gypsy Moth Host Material From Canada; Removal of Infested Areas in British Columbia, Canada2002-Jun-1402-15074We are proposing to amend the regulations concerning gypsy moth host material from Canada by removing the areas in British Columbia from the list of gypsy moth infested areas. Surveys have shown that those areas in British Columbia have been free of gypsy moth for the past 2 years. This proposed action would remove restrictions on the importation of regulated articles from British Columbia that no longer appear necessary.
Agriculture Department -- Steam Treatment of Golden Nematode-Infested Farm Equipment, Construction Equipment, and Containers2002-Feb-2502-4384We are amending the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference into the Code of Federal Regulations, to allow containers, construction equipment without cabs, and farm equipment without cabs used in golden nematode-infested areas to be treated with steam heat before being moved interstate from any regulated area. This action provides an alternative to fumigation with methyl bromide for treating used containers, construction equipment without cabs, and farm equipment without cabs.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Fruits and Vegetables; Technical Amendment2002-Feb-2202-4263In a final rule published in the Federal Register on August 28, 2001, we amended the fruits and vegetables regulations to list a number of fruits and vegetables from certain parts of the world as eligible, under specified conditions, for importation into the United States. In that final rule, we also recognized the Department of Peten in Guatemala and all Districts in Belize as areas free of the Mediterranean fruit fly. The final rule contained an error in the rule portion. This document corrects that error. We are also clarifying that peppers imported from Israel under the regulations must be packed in insect-proof packaging prior to movement from approved insect-proof screenhouses in the Arava Valley.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Unshu Oranges From Japan2002-Feb-0102-2492We are amending the regulations governing the importation of citrus fruit to allow, under certain conditions, Unshu oranges grown on Kyushu Island, Japan, to be imported into non-citrus-producing areas of the United States. We are also amending the regulations for importing Unshu oranges from Honshu Island, Japan, by requiring fumigation using methyl bromide prior to exportation and by allowing the fruit to be distributed to additional areas in the United States, including citrus- producing areas. In addition, we are removing the requirement for individually wrapping Unshu oranges imported from Japan or the Republic of Korea. These actions would relieve restrictions on the importation into and distribution within the United States of Unshu oranges without presenting a significant risk of introducing citrus canker or other diseases or pests of plants.
Agriculture Department -- Update of Nursery Stock Regulations2001-Dec-2801-31602We are proposing to amend the regulations for importing nursery stock to require additional certifications for imported niger seed and lilac, to reflect recent changes in plant taxonomy and pest distributions, and to make various changes to the requirements for postentry quarantine of imported plants. We are also proposing several other amendments to update and clarify the regulations and improve their effectiveness. This action is necessary to update the existing regulations and make them easier to understand and implement.
Agriculture Department -- Mexican Hass Avocado Import Program2001-Nov-0101-27485We are amending the regulations governing the importation of fruits and vegetables to increase the number of States in which fresh avocado fruit grown in approved orchards in approved municipalities in Michoacan, Mexico, may be distributed. We are also lengthening the shipping season during which the Mexican Hass avocados may be imported into the United States. We are taking this action in response to a request from the Government of Mexico and after determining that expanding the current Mexican avocado import program would present a negligible risk of introducing plant pests into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Phytosanitary Certificates for Imported Fruits and Vegetables2001-Aug-2901-21809We are proposing to amend our regulations to require that a phytosanitary certificate accompany all fruits and vegetables imported into the United States, with certain exceptions. This proposal would include commercial produce imported into the United States as well as fruits and vegetables brought in by travelers. We would exempt fruits and vegetables that are dried, cured, frozen, or processed, as well as fruits and vegetables that travelers and shoppers bring into the United States for personal use through land ports of entry located along the Canadian and Mexican borders. The regulations currently do not require that phytosanitary certificates accompany produce imported into this country, except for certain fruits and vegetables grown in designated foreign regions. We believe this change is necessary to help prevent foreign plant pests from being introduced into and disseminated within the United States. If implemented, this proposal would require changes in the practices of importers and travelers who bring produce into the United States from other countries.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Fruits and Vegetables2001-Aug-2801-21641We are amending the fruits and vegetables regulations to list a number of fruits and vegetables from certain parts of the world as eligible, under specified conditions, for importation into the United States. All of the fruits and vegetables, as a condition of entry, will be inspected and subject to disinfection at the port of first arrival as may be required by a U.S. Department of Agriculture inspector. In addition, some of the fruits and vegetables will be required to be treated or meet other special conditions. This action will provide the United States with additional kinds and sources of fruits and vegetables while continuing to provide protection against the introduction of injurious plant pests by imported fruits and vegetables. We are also recognizing the Department of Peten in Guatemala and all Districts in Belize as areas free of the Mediterranean fruit fly. This action will relieve import restrictions while continuing to prevent the introduction of plant pests into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Mexican Hass Avocado Import Program2001-Jul-1301-17444We are proposing to amend the regulations governing the importation of fruits and vegetables to expand the number of States in which fresh avocado fruit grown in approved orchards in approved municipalities in Michoacan, Mexico, may be distributed. We are also proposing to increase the length of the shipping season during which the Mexican Hass avocados may be imported into the United States. We are proposing this action in response to a request from the Government of Mexico and after determining that expanding the current Mexican avocado import program would present a negligible risk of introducing plant pests into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Mangoes From the Philippines2001-Jun-1401-14937We are amending the regulations governing the importation of fruits and vegetables to allow the importation of mangoes from Guimaras Island in the Republic of the Philippines, subject to inspection and the completion of a prescribed vapor heat treatment. We believe that this action is warranted because there appears to be no significant pest risk associated with the importation of mangoes from Guimaras Island in the Philippines under these circumstances. This action will relieve restrictions on the importation of mangoes from the Philippines without presenting a significant risk of introducing plant pests into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Cold Treatment for Fresh Fruits; Port of Corpus Christi, TX2001-Jun-0101-13758We are proposing to allow, under certain conditions, the cold treatment of imported fruit upon arrival at the port of Corpus Christi, TX. We have determined that there are biological barriers at this port that, along with certain safeguards, would prevent the introduction of fruit flies and other insect pests into the United States in the unlikely event that they escape from shipments of fruit before the fruit undergoes cold treatment. This action would facilitate the importation of fruit requiring cold treatment while continuing to provide protection against the introduction of fruit flies and other insect pests into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Plant Protection Act; Revisions to Authority Citations2001-Apr-2701-9797We are amending the regulations in title 7, chapter III, and title 9, chapter I, to reflect the enactment of the Plant Protection Act (Pub. L. 106-224, 114 Stat. 438, 7 U.S.C. 7701-7772) in our lists of legal authorities. We are also removing or revising citations and references to plant protection and quarantine statutes that were repealed as a result of the enactment of this law. In addition, we are updating the authority citations throughout our regulations in titles 7 and 9, where appropriate, to remove duplicative or outdated citations and to reflect recent changes to the internal organization, functions, and delegations of authority within the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. We are also making other nonsubstantive editorial changes in the regulations for the sake of clarity.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Artificially Dwarfed Plants2001-Apr-2001-9792We are proposing to amend the regulations for importing plants and plant products by requiring artificially dwarfed plants that are imported into the United States to have been grown under certain conditions in nurseries registered with the government of the country where the plants were grown. We are proposing this action to protect against the introduction of longhorned beetles and other dangerous plant pests into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Unshu Oranges2001-Apr-1801-9628We are proposing to amend the regulations governing the importation of citrus fruit to allow, under certain conditions, Unshu oranges grown on Kyushu Island, Japan, to be imported into noncitrus- producing areas of the United States. We are also proposing to amend the regulations for importing Unshu oranges from Honshu Island, Japan, by requiring fumigation using methyl bromide prior to exportation and by allowing the fruit to be distributed to additional areas of the United States, including citrus-producing areas. In addition, we are proposing to remove the requirement for individually wrapping Unshu oranges imported from Japan or the Republic of Korea. These actions would relieve restrictions on the importation into and distribution within the United States of Unshu oranges without presenting a significant risk of introducing citrus canker or other diseases or pests of plants.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Mangoes From the Philippines2001-Jan-2201-1655We are proposing to amend the regulations governing the importation of fruits and vegetables to allow the importation of mangoes from Guimaras Island in the Republic of the Philippines, subject to inspection and the completion of a prescribed vapor heat treatment. We believe that this action is warranted because there appears to be no significant pest risk associated with the importation of mangoes from Guimaras Island in the Philippines under these circumstances. This action would relieve restrictions on the importation of mangoes from the Philippines without presenting a significant risk of introducing plant pests into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Artificially Dwarfed Plants in Growing Media From the People's Republic of China2000-Sep-2000-24133We are proposing to amend our regulations governing the importation of plants and plant products to allow artificially dwarfed (penjing) plants of the genera Buxus, Ehretia (Carmona), Podocarpus, Sageretia, and Serissa to be imported into the United States from the People's Republic of China in an approved growing medium subject to specified growing, inspection, and certification requirements. We have assessed the pest risks associated with the importation of these artificially dwarfed plants established in growing media and have determined that they may be imported from the People's Republic of China under the conditions proposed without presenting a significant risk of introducing or disseminating dangerous plant pests. This proposed rule would relieve restrictions that currently allow these genera to be imported only as bare-rooted plants.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Fruits and Vegetables2000-Aug-2100-21174We are proposing to amend the fruits and vegetables regulations to list a number of fruits and vegetables from certain parts of the world as eligible, under specified conditions, for importation into the United States. All of the fruits and vegetables, as a condition of entry, would be inspected and subject to disinfection at the port of first arrival as may be required by a U.S. Department of Agriculture inspector. In addition, some of the fruits and vegetables would be required to be treated or meet other special conditions. This action would provide the United States with additional kinds and sources of fruits and vegetables while continuing to provide protection against the introduction of injurious plant pests by imported fruits and vegetables. We are also proposing to recognize the State of Baja California Sur, Mexico, as an area free of certain fruit flies and recognize Belize and the Department of Peten, Guatemala, as areas free of the Mediterranean fruit fly. This action would relieve import restrictions while continuing to prevent the introduction of plant pests into the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Gypsy Moth Host Material From Canada2000-Jun-2000-15470We are adopting as a final rule, with minor changes discussed in this document, an interim rule that established regulations for the importation into the United States of gypsy moth host materials from Canada due to infestations of gypsy moth in the Provinces of British Columbia, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, and Quebec. The rule requires trees without roots (e.g., Christmas trees), trees with roots, shrubs with roots and persistent woody stems, logs and pulpwood with bark attached, outdoor household articles, and mobile homes and their associated equipment to meet specified certification or destination requirements if they are intended to be moved into or through areas of the United States that are not infested with gypsy moth. This action is necessary to prevent the introduction of gypsy moth into noninfested areas of the United States.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Grapefruit, Lemons, and Oranges From Argentina2000-Jun-1500-14851We are amending the citrus fruit regulations by recognizing a citrus-growing area within Argentina as being free from citrus canker. Surveys conducted by Argentine plant health authorities in that area of Argentina since 1992 have shown the area to be free from citrus canker, and Argentine authorities are enforcing restrictions designed to protect the area from the introduction of that disease. We are also amending the fruits and vegetables regulations to allow the importation of grapefruit, lemons, and oranges from the citrus canker-free area of Argentina under conditions designed to prevent the introduction into the United States of two other diseases of citrus, sweet orange scab and citrus black spot, and other plant pests. These changes will allow grapefruit, lemons, and oranges to be imported into the continental United States from Argentina subject to certain conditions.
Agriculture Department -- Irradiation Phytosanitary Treatment of Imported Fruits and Vegetables2000-May-2600-13291We are proposing to establish regulations providing for use of irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment for fruits and vegetables imported into the United States. The irradiation treatment would provide protection against fruit flies and the mango seed weevil. This proposal would provide an alternative to the currently approved treatments (various fumigation, cold, and heat treatments, and systems approaches employing techniques such as greenhouse growing) against fruit flies and the mango seed weevil in fruits and vegetables.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Fuji Variety Apples From the Republic of Korea2000-Apr-2600-10388We are proposing to amend the regulations governing the importation of fruits and vegetables to allow Fuji variety apples grown in certified orchards within approved production areas in the Republic of Korea to be imported into the United States, without treatment, under conditions designed to prevent the introduction into the United States of the peach fruit moths (Carposina sasakii and C. niponensis), the yellow peach moth (Conogethes punctiferalis), the fruit tree spider mite (Tetranychus viennensis), and the kanzawa mite (T. kanzawai). The conditions to which the proposed importation of Fuji variety apples would be subject, including pest risk-reducing cultural practices, packinghouse procedures, and inspection and shipping procedures, would reduce the risk of pest introduction to an insignificant level.
Agriculture Department -- Importation of Wood Chips From Chile2000-Apr-2000-9937We are adopting as a final rule, with changes, a proposed rule to allow the importation of Pinus radiata wood chips from Chile if the surfaces of the wood chips are treated with a specified pesticide mixture. This change to the regulations for importing logs, lumber, and other unmanufactured wood articles will provide another alternative for persons interested in importing wood chips from Chile while continuing to protect against the introduction of dangerous plant pests.
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