Animal Welfare

animal-welfare
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
Agriculture Department -- Rinderpest; Update of Communicable Animal Disease Provisions2018-Apr-112018-07232We are amending the regulations concerning communicable diseases of livestock and poultry, interstate transportation and importation of animals (including poultry) and animal products, and permits for biological products to remove references to the animal disease rinderpest. This action reflects recognition by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service that rinderpest has been eradicated worldwide, and removes restrictions that are no longer necessary due to eradication of the disease. This action better aligns our regulations with World Organization for Animal Health guidelines for international trade as they pertain to rinderpest.
Agriculture Department -- Exportation of Live Animals, Hatching Eggs, and Animal Germplasm From the United States2016-Oct-262016-25860In a final rule published in the Federal Register on January 20, 2016, and effective on February 19, 2016, we revised our regulations regarding the exportation of livestock from the United States. Among other revisions, we expanded the scope of the regulations so that, if the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) knows that an importing country requires an export health certificate endorsed by the competent veterinary authority of the United States for any animal other than livestock or for any animal semen, animal embryos, hatching eggs, other embryonated eggs, or gametes intended for export to that country, the animal or other commodity must have an endorsed export health certificate in order to be eligible for export from the United States. While, in the preamble for that rule, we indicated that APHIS is the competent veterinary authority of the United States, and must endorse the export health certificate in such instances, this was not reflected in the regulations themselves. This document corrects that error.
Agriculture Department -- Thresholds for De Minimis Activity and Exemptions From Licensing Under the Animal Welfare Act2016-Aug-042016-18452We are proposing to amend the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) regulations in response to a 2014 Farm Bill amendment to the Act that provides the Secretary of Agriculture with the authority to determine that animal dealers and exhibitors are not required to obtain a license under the Act and regulations if the size of the business conducting AWA-related activities is determined to be de minimis by the Secretary. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has reviewed past compliance with the Animal Welfare Act of currently-regulated facilities and has determined that de minimis businesses, as defined in the rule are capable of providing adequate care and treatment of the animals involved in regulated business activities. We also propose amending the regulations in response to a 2013 amendment to the Act that excludes from the definition of ``exhibitor'' some owners of household pets that are exhibited occasionally, generate less than a substantial portion of income, and reside exclusively with the owner. Dealers and exhibitors operating at or below the thresholds determined for their particular AWA-related business activity would be exempted from Federal licensing requirements established under the Act and regulations. Our proposed actions would amend the regulations to be consistent with the Act while continuing to ensure the humane care and treatment of animals covered under the AWA.
Agriculture Department -- Horse Protection; Licensing of Designated Qualified Persons and Other Amendments2016-Jul-262016-17648We are proposing to amend the horse protection regulations to provide that the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) will train and license Designated Qualified Persons (DQPs) to inspect horses at horse shows, exhibitions, sales, and auctions for compliance with the Horse Protection Act. DQPs are currently trained and licensed through programs certified by APHIS and initiated and maintained by horse industry organizations (HIOs). Under this proposal, APHIS will train and license DQPs on an individual basis. The proposed changes to the regulations would relieve HIOs of all regulatory burdens and requirements. We would also establish a process by which APHIS could revoke the license of a DQP for professional misconduct or failure to conduct inspections in accordance with the regulations. We would establish requirements to minimize conflicts of interest between DQPs and others within the horse industry that enable the practice of soring. We are also proposing several changes to the responsibilities of management of horse shows, exhibitions, sales, and auctions, as well as changes to the list of devices, equipment, substances, and practices that can cause soring or are otherwise prohibited under the Horse Protection Act and regulations. Additionally, we are proposing to amend the inspection procedures that DQPs are required to perform. These actions would strengthen existing requirements intended to protect horses from the unnecessary and cruel practice of soring and eliminate unfair competition.
Agriculture Department -- Animal Welfare; Marine Mammals2016-Feb-032016-01837We are proposing to amend the Animal Welfare Act regulations concerning the humane handling, care, treatment, and transportation of marine mammals in captivity. These proposed changes would affect sections in the regulations relating to variances and implementation dates, indoor facilities, outdoor facilities, space requirements, and water quality. We are also proposing to revise the regulations that relate to swim-with-the-dolphin programs. We believe these actions are necessary to ensure that the minimum standards for the humane handling, care, treatment, and transportation of marine mammals in captivity are based on current industry and scientific knowledge and experience.
Agriculture Department -- Exportation of Live Animals, Hatching Eggs, and Animal Germplasm From the United States2016-Jan-202016-00962We are revising the regulations pertaining to the exportation of livestock from the United States. Among other things, we are removing most of the requirements for export health certifications, tests, and treatments from the regulations, and instead directing exporters to follow the requirements of the importing country regarding such processes and procedures. We are retaining only those export health certification, testing, and treatment requirements that we consider necessary to have assurances regarding the health and welfare of livestock exported from the United States. We also are allowing pre- export inspection of livestock to occur at facilities other than an export inspection facility associated with the port of embarkation, under certain circumstances, and replacing specific standards for export inspection facilities and ocean vessels with performance standards. These changes will provide exporters and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) with more flexibility in arranging for the export of livestock from the United States while continuing to ensure the health and welfare of the livestock. Additionally, if APHIS knows that an importing country requires an export health certificate endorsed by the competent veterinary authority of the United States for any animal other than livestock, including pets, or for any hatching eggs or animal germplasm, we are requiring that the animal, hatching eggs, or animal germplasm have such a health certificate to be eligible for export from the United States. This change will help ensure that all animals, hatching eggs, and animal germplasm exported from the United States meet the health requirements of the countries to which they are destined. Finally, we are making editorial amendments to the regulations to make them easier to understand and comply with.
Agriculture Department -- Exportation of Live Animals, Hatching Eggs, and Animal Germplasm From the United States2015-Feb-262015-04013We are proposing to revise the regulations pertaining to the exportation of livestock from the United States. Among other things, we propose to remove most of the requirements for export health certifications, tests, and treatments from the regulations, and instead would direct exporters to follow the requirements of the importing country regarding such processes and procedures. We propose to retain only those export health certification, testing, and treatment requirements that we consider necessary to have assurances regarding the health and welfare of livestock exported from the United States. We also propose to allow pre-export inspection of livestock to occur at facilities other than an export inspection facility associated with the port of embarkation, under certain circumstances, and propose to replace specific standards for export inspection facilities and ocean vessels with performance standards. These changes would provide exporters and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service with more flexibility in arranging for the export of livestock from the United States while continuing to ensure the health and welfare of the livestock. Additionally, if a country is known to require an export health certificate for any animal other than livestock, including pets, or for any hatching eggs or animal germplasm, we propose to require that the animal, hatching eggs, or animal germplasm have an export health certificate to be eligible for export from the United States. This change would help ensure that all animals, hatching eggs, and animal germplasm exported from the United States meet the health requirements of the countries to which they are destined. Finally, we are proposing editorial amendments to the regulations to make them easier to understand and comply with.
Agriculture Department -- Animal Welfare; Retail Pet Stores and Licensing Exemptions; Technical Amendment2015-Jan-232015-01149In a final rule published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2013, and effective on November 18, 2013, we amended the regulations concerning the definition of retail pet store and related regulations in order to ensure that the definition in the regulations is consistent with the Animal Welfare Act (AWA), thereby bringing more pet animals sold at retail under the protection of the AWA. As part of that action, we raised from three to four the maximum number of female breeding dogs, cats, or certain other animals that a person can maintain and be exempted from licensing, as long as they sell only the offspring of those animals born and raised on their premises for pets or exhibition and are not otherwise required to obtain a license. In the final rule, we overlooked raising the number of breeding females in one provision in the regulations concerning animal purchases by dealers and exhibitors. This document corrects the oversight.
Agriculture Department -- Animal Welfare; Importation of Live Dogs2014-Aug-182014-19515We are amending the regulations to implement an amendment to the Animal Welfare Act (AWA). The Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 added a new section to the AWA to restrict the importation of certain live dogs. Consistent with this amendment, this rule prohibits the importation of dogs, with limited exceptions, from any part of the world into the continental United States or Hawaii for purposes of resale, research, or veterinary treatment, unless the dogs are in good health, have received all necessary vaccinations, and are at least 6 months of age. This action is necessary to implement the amendment to the AWA and will help to ensure the welfare of imported dogs.
Interior Department -- Addresses of Headquarters Offices2014-Jul-292014-17768We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), are updating the addresses of our headquarters offices in our regulations. The Service will relocate its headquarters offices on July 28, 2014. We are taking this action to ensure regulated entities and the general public have accurate contact information for the Service's offices.
Agriculture Department -- Horse Protection Act; Requiring Horse Industry Organizations To Assess and Enforce Minimum Penalties for Violations; Correction2014-Jan-172014-00880In a final rule that was published in the Federal Register on June 7, 2012, and effective on July 9, 2012, we amended the horse protection regulations to require horse industry organizations or associations that license Designated Qualified Persons to assess and enforce minimum penalties for violations of the Horse Protection Act. One of the minimum penalties was for violations related to shoeing the horse, but we neglected to include a citation to one of the shoeing violations for which the penalty should be assessed. This document corrects that error.
National Aeronautics and Space Administration -- Removal of Redundant Regulations2013-Dec-162013-29475This direct final rule makes nonsubstantive changes by removing redundant regulatory language that is already captured in statues that govern NASA activities related to delegation of authority of certain civil rights functions, protection of human subjects, and care and use of animals in the conduct of NASA activities. Therefore, NASA regulations will be streamlined to make reference to those statutes.
Agriculture Department -- Animal Welfare; Retail Pet Stores and Licensing Exemptions2013-Sep-182013-22616We are revising the definition of retail pet store and related regulations in order to ensure that the definition of retail pet store in the regulations is consistent with the Animal Welfare Act (AWA), thereby bringing more pet animals sold at retail under the protection of the AWA. Specifically, we are narrowing the definition of retail pet store to mean a place of business or residence at which the seller, buyer, and the animal available for sale are physically present so that every buyer may personally observe the animal prior to purchasing and/ or taking custody of that animal after purchase, and where only certain animals are sold or offered for sale, at retail, for use as pets. Retail pet stores are not required to be licensed and inspected under the AWA. In addition, we are removing the limitation on the source of gross income from the licensing exemption in the regulations for any person who does not sell or negotiate the sale of any wild or exotic animal, dog, or cat and who derives no more than $500 gross income from the sale of the animals other than wild or exotic animals, dogs, or cats during any calendar year. We are also increasing from three to four the number of breeding female dogs, cats, and/or small exotic or wild mammals that a person may maintain on his or her premises and be exempt from the licensing and inspection requirements if he or she sells only the offspring of those animals born and raised on his or her premises, for pets or exhibition. This exemption applies regardless of whether those animals are sold at retail or wholesale. These actions are necessary so that all animals sold at retail for use as pets are monitored for their health and humane treatment.
Agriculture Department -- Horse Protection Act; Requiring Horse Industry Organizations To Assess and Enforce Minimum Penalties for Violations; Correction2013-May-092013-11028In a final rule that was published in the Federal Register on June 7, 2012, and effective on July 9, 2012, we amended the horse protection regulations to require horse industry organizations or associations that license Designated Qualified Persons to assess and enforce minimum penalties for violations of the Horse Protection Act. This document corrects an error in that final rule.
Agriculture Department -- Handling of Animals; Contingency Plans2012-Dec-312012-31422We are amending the Animal Welfare Act regulations to add requirements for contingency planning and training of personnel by research facilities and by dealers, exhibitors, intermediate handlers, and carriers. We are taking this action because we believe all licensees and registrants should develop a contingency plan for all animals regulated under the Animal Welfare Act in an effort to better prepare for potential disasters. This action will heighten the awareness of licensees and registrants regarding their responsibilities and help ensure a timely and appropriate response should an emergency or disaster occur.
Agriculture Department -- Submission of Itineraries2012-Dec-312012-31417We are amending the Animal Welfare Act regulations to include more specific requirements in the regulations concerning the submission of itineraries by any person who is subject to the Animal Welfare Act regulations and who intends to exhibit any animal at any location other than the person's approved site when travel will extend overnight. APHIS inspectors need access to animals, facilities, and records for unannounced inspections when animals are exhibited at a location other than at a regulated person's approved site to improve compliance with the regulations and the Animal Welfare Act.
Interior Department -- Importation, Exportation, and Transportation of Wildlife; User Fee Exemption Program for Low-Risk Importations and Exportations2012-Oct-262012-26504The Service is changing the inspection fees required for imports and exports of wildlife by certain licensed businesses. Our regulations set forth the fees that are required to be paid at the time of inspection of imports and exports of wildlife. In 2009, we implemented a new user fee system intended to recover the costs of the compliance portion of the wildlife inspection program. Since that time, we have been made aware that we may have placed an undue economic burden on businesses that exclusively trade in small volumes of low- value, non-Federally protected wildlife parts and products. To address this issue, the Service is implementing a program that exempts certain businesses from the designated port base inspection fees as an interim measure while the Service reassesses its current user fee system.
Agriculture Department -- Horse Protection Act; Requiring Horse Industry Organizations To Assess and Enforce Minimum Penalties for Violations2012-Jun-072012-13759We are amending the horse protection regulations to require horse industry organizations or associations that license Designated Qualified Persons to assess and enforce minimum penalties for violations of the Horse Protection Act (the Act). The regulations currently provide that such penalties will be set either by the horse industry organization or association or by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This action will strengthen our enforcement of the Act by ensuring that minimum penalties are assessed and enforced consistently by all horse industry organizations and associations that are certified under the regulations by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Agriculture Department -- Animal Welfare; Retail Pet Stores and Licensing Exemptions2012-May-162012-11839We are proposing to revise the definition of retail pet store and related regulations to bring more pet animals sold at retail under the protection of the Animal Welfare Act (AWA). Specifically, we would narrow the definition of retail pet store so that it means a place of business or residence that each buyer physically enters in order to personally observe the animals available for sale prior to purchase and/or to take custody of the animals after purchase, and where only certain animals are sold or offered for sale, at retail, for use as pets. Retail pet stores are not required to be licensed and inspected under the AWA. We are also proposing to increase from three to four the number of breeding female dogs, cats, and/or small exotic or wild mammals that a person may maintain on his or her premises and be exempt from the licensing and inspection requirements if he or she sells only the offspring of those animals born and raised on his or her premises, for pets or exhibition. This exemption would apply regardless of whether those animals are sold at retail or wholesale. This proposed rule is necessary to ensure that animals sold at retail are monitored for their health and humane treatment and to concentrate our regulatory efforts on those facilities that present the greatest risk of noncompliance with the regulations.
Agriculture Department -- Commercial Transportation of Equines to Slaughter2011-Sep-072011-22762We are amending the regulations regarding the commercial transportation of equines to slaughter to add a definition of equine for slaughter and make other changes that will extend the protections afforded by the regulations to equines bound for slaughter but delivered first to an assembly point, feedlot, or stockyard. This action will further ensure the humane treatment of such equines by helping to ensure that the unique and special needs of equines in commercial transportation to slaughter are met.
Agriculture Department -- Animal Welfare; Importation of Live Dogs2011-Sep-012011-22413We are proposing to amend the regulations to implement an amendment to the Animal Welfare Act (AWA). The Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 added a new section to the AWA to restrict the importation of certain live dogs. Consistent with this amendment, this proposed rule would, with certain limited exceptions, prohibit the importation of dogs from any part of the world into the continental United States or Hawaii for purposes of resale, research, or veterinary treatment, unless the dogs are in good health, have received all necessary vaccinations, and are at least 6 months of age. This proposed rule is necessary to implement the amendment to the AWA and would help to ensure the welfare of imported dogs.
Agriculture Department -- Horse Protection Act; Requiring Horse Industry Organizations To Assess and Enforce Minimum Penalties for Violations2011-May-272011-13231We are proposing to amend the horse protection regulations to require horse industry organizations or associations that license Designated Qualified Persons to assess and enforce minimum penalties for violations of the Horse Protection Act (the Act) and the regulations. The regulations currently provide that such penalties will be set either by the horse industry organization or association or by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This action would strengthen our enforcement of the Act and the regulations by ensuring that minimum penalties are assessed and enforced consistently by all horse industry organizations and associations that are appointed under the Act by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to cooperate in our enforcement efforts.
Agriculture Department -- Live Goats and Swine for Export; Removal of Certain Testing Requirements2011-May-242011-12758We are amending the livestock exportation regulations to eliminate the requirement for pre-export tuberculosis and brucellosis testing of goats and breeding swine intended for export to countries that do not require such tests. This action will facilitate the exportation of goats and breeding swine by eliminating the need to conduct pre-export tuberculosis and brucellosis testing when the receiving country does not require such testing.
Agriculture Department -- Removal of the List of Ports of Embarkation and Export Inspection Facilities From the Regulations2011-Apr-042011-7897We are amending the live animal export regulations by removing the list of designated ports of embarkation and their associated export inspection facilities. As a result of this rulemaking, those ports and facilities will be listed on the Internet rather than in the regulations, thus enabling us to amend the list, when necessary, in a timelier manner than we have been able to heretofore and allowing us greater flexibility in regulating animal exports.
Agriculture Department -- Submission of Itineraries2009-Oct-019-23679We are proposing to amend the Animal Welfare Act regulations to include more specific requirements in the regulations concerning the submission of itineraries by any person who is subject to the Animal Welfare Act regulations and who intends to exhibit any animal at any location other than the person's approved site(s). We believe APHIS' inspectors' access to animals, facilities, and records for unannounced inspections when animals are exhibited at a location other than at a regulated person's approved site(s) is necessary to improve compliance with the regulations and the Animal Welfare Act.
Interior Department -- Importation, Exportation, and Transportation of Wildlife; Inspection Fees, Import/Export Licenses, and Import/Export License Exemptions2008-Dec-098-29070We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), publish this final rule to revise subpart I--Import/Export Licenses, of title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations, part 14 (50 CFR 14), to clarify the import/export license and fee requirements, adjust the inspection fee schedule, and update license and inspection fee exemptions. We are clarifying when an import/export license is required by persons who engage in the business of importing and exporting wildlife as well as changing the license requirement exemptions. Revised regulations will help those importing and exporting wildlife better understand when an import/export license is required and will allow us to consistently apply these requirements. We are gradually increasing inspection fees, and now publishing the changes for 2008 through 2012. We determined that these inspection fees must be adjusted every year to cover the increased cost of providing inspection services. Because we are publishing these inspection fee changes now, importers and exporters can accurately predict the costs of importing and exporting wildlife several years in advance.
Agriculture Department -- Handling of Animals; Contingency Plans2008-Oct-238-25289We are proposing to amend the Animal Welfare Act regulations to add requirements for contingency planning and training of personnel by research facilities and by dealers, exhibitors, intermediate handlers, and carriers. We are proposing these requirements because we believe all licensees and registrants should develop a contingency plan for all animals regulated under the Animal Welfare Act in an effort to better prepare for potential disasters. This action would heighten the awareness of licensees and registrants regarding their responsibilities and help ensure a timely and appropriate response should an emergency or disaster occur.
Health and Human Services Department -- Standards of Care for Chimpanzees Held in the Federally Supported Chimpanzee Sanctuary System2008-Oct-108-23518The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is issuing standards to implement provisions of the Chimpanzee Health Improvement, Maintenance, and Protection Act (CHIMP Act) authorizing the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to develop and publish standards of care for chimpanzees held in the sanctuary system supported by federal funds authorized under the CHIMP Act. This regulation applies to only those facilities receiving federal funds as a part of the federally funded chimpanzee sanctuary system.
Agriculture Department -- Minimum Age Requirements for the Transport of Animals2008-May-098-10400We propose to amend the Animal Welfare Act regulations by adding minimum age requirements for the transport in commerce of animals. The regulations currently contain such requirements for dogs and cats, but no corresponding ones for other regulated animals, despite the risks associated with the early transport of these species. We also propose to amend the regulations to allow, provided certain conditions are met, for animals to be transported without their mothers for medical treatment and for scientific research before reaching the minimum age and weaning requirement. Establishing minimum age requirements for the transport in commerce of animals and providing for the transport of animals that have not met the minimum age requirements are necessary to help ensure the humane treatment of these animals.
Interior Department -- Importation, Exportation, and Transportation of Wildlife; Inspection Fees, Import/Export Licenses, and Import/Export License Exemptions2008-Feb-258-3330We propose to revise subpart I--Import/Export Licenses, of title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations, part 14, (50 CFR 14) to clarify the import/export license and fee requirements, adjust the user fee schedule and update license and user fee exemptions. We propose to clarify when an import/export license is required by persons who engage in the business of importing and exporting wildlife as well as change the license requirement exemptions. Revised regulations will help those importing and exporting wildlife better understand when an import/ export license is required and will allow us to consistently apply these requirements. We also propose to change our user fee structure for the importation and exportation of wildlife and the fee exemptions. We propose to generally increase these fees and publish the changes for 2008 through 2012. We determined that these fees must be adjusted every year to cover the increased cost of providing these services. By publishing these user fee changes in advance, importers and exporters can accurately predict the costs of importing and exporting wildlife several years in advance.
Agriculture Department -- Animal Welfare; Climatic and Environmental Conditions for Transportation of Warmblooded Animals Other Than Marine Mammals2008-Jan-037-25530We are proposing to amend the Animal Welfare Act regulations regarding transportation of live animals other than marine mammals by removing the current ambient temperature requirements for various stages in the transportation of those animals. We would replace those requirements with a single performance standard under which the animals would be transported under climatic and environmental conditions that are appropriate for their welfare. The regulations currently require that ambient temperatures be maintained within certain ranges during transportation, but animals may be transported at ambient temperatures below the minimum temperatures if their consignor provides a certificate signed by a veterinarian certifying that the animals are acclimated to temperatures lower than the minimum temperature. This proposal would make acclimation certificates for live animals other than marine mammals unnecessary. This proposal replaces a previously published proposed rule, which we are withdrawing as part of this document, that would have required that the acclimation certificate for a dog or cat be signed by the owner of the dog or cat being transported rather than by a veterinarian. This proposal does not address marine mammals due to their unique requirements for care and handling. These changes would remove potentially confusing temperature requirements and acclimation certificate provisions from the regulations governing the transportation of animals other than marine mammals and focus those regulations on ensuring that climatic and environmental conditions are maintained appropriately during transportation of those animals.
Agriculture Department -- Commercial Transportation of Equines to Slaughter2007-Nov-077-21896We are proposing to amend the regulations regarding the commercial transportation of equines to slaughter to add a definition of equine for slaughter and make other changes that will extend the protections afforded by the regulations to equines bound for slaughter but delivered first to an assembly point, feedlot, or stockyard. This action would further ensure the humane treatment of such equines by helping to ensure that the unique and special needs of equines in commercial transportation to slaughter are met.
Interior Department -- Regulations To Implement the Captive Wildlife Safety Act2007-Aug-167-16085We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, are implementing the Captive Wildlife Safety Act (CWSA) in a new subpart K of part 14, Importation, Exportation, and Transportation of Wildlife, in Title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The CWSA amends the Lacey Act by making it illegal to import, export, transport, sell, receive, acquire, or purchase, in interstate or foreign commerce, live lions, tigers, leopards, snow leopards, clouded leopards, cheetahs, jaguars, or cougars, or any hybrid combination of any of these species, unless certain exceptions are met.
Agriculture Department -- Cattle for Export; Removal of Certain Testing Requirements2007-Jul-237-14177We are amending the livestock exportation regulations to eliminate the requirement for pre-export tuberculosis and brucellosis testing of certain cattle being exported to countries that do not require such testing. This action will facilitate the exportation of certain cattle by eliminating the need to conduct pre-export tuberculosis and brucellosis testing when the receiving country does not require such testing.
Agriculture Department -- Cattle for Export; Removal of Certain Testing Requirements2007-Jan-107-111We are proposing to amend the livestock exportation regulations to eliminate the requirement for pre-export tuberculosis and brucellosis testing of certain cattle being exported to countries that do not require such testing. This action would facilitate the exportation of certain cattle by eliminating the need to conduct pre- export tuberculosis and brucellosis testing when the receiving country does not require such testing.
Agriculture Department -- Shift Cage Requirements2006-Apr-286-6421We are proposing to amend the Animal Welfare Act regulations concerning the handling of animals to require that shift cages be used for handling certain species. One of the largest risk factors for animal escape and employee and animal injury occurs when it is necessary to move, or shift, certain animals between enclosures. Requiring shift cages for certain species would mitigate the risk of injuries to people and animals as well as ensure safe transport of animals between enclosures and exhibits.
Interior Department -- Regulations To Implement the Captive Wildlife Safety Act2006-Jan-316-1191We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, propose to implement the Captive Wildlife Safety Act (CWSA). The CWSA amends the Lacey Act by making it illegal to import, export, buy, sell, transport, receive, or acquire, in interstate or foreign commerce, live lions, tigers, leopards, snow leopards, clouded leopards, cheetahs, jaguars, or cougars, or any hybrid combination of any of these species, unless certain exceptions are met.
Health and Human Services Department -- Standards of Care for Chimpanzees Held in the Federally Supported Chimpanzee Sanctuary System2005-Jan-1105-394The National Institutes of Health (NIH) proposes to issue standards to implement provisions of the Chimpanzee Health Improvement, Maintenance, and Protection Act (CHIMP Act) authorizing the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) to develop and publish standards of care for chimpanzees held in the Sanctuary system supported by Federal funds authorized under the CHIMP Act. These regulations will apply to only those facilities receiving Federal funds as a part of the federally funded chimpanzee Sanctuary system.
Interior Department -- Conferring Designated Port Status on Houston, TX; Louisville, KY; and Memphis, TN2004-Dec-0604-26717We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, make Houston, Texas; Louisville, Kentucky; and Memphis, Tennessee, designated ports under section 9(f) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). This action will allow the direct importation and exportation of wildlife and wildlife products through these growing international ports. We are changing the regulations in 50 CFR part 14 to reflect this designation.
Agriculture Department -- Animal Welfare; Inspection, Licensing, and Procurement of Animals2004-Jul-1404-15878We are amending the Animal Welfare Act regulations to revise and clarify the exemptions from the licensing requirements, the procedures for applying for licenses and renewals, and the restrictions upon the acquisition of dogs, cats, and other animals. These actions are necessary to help ensure compliance with the regulations and the Animal Welfare Act.
Agriculture Department -- Animal Welfare; Definition of Animal2004-Jun-0404-12693We are amending the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) regulations to reflect an amendment to the Act's definition of the term animal. The Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 amended the definition of animal to specifically exclude birds, rats of the genus Rattus, and mice of the genus Mus, bred for use in research. While the definition of animal in the regulations has excluded rats of the genus Rattus and mice of the genus Mus bred for use in research, that definition has also excluded all birds (i.e., not just those birds bred for use in research). To make the definition of animal in the regulations consistent with the definition of animal in the AWA, this final rule amends the regulations by narrowing the scope of the exclusion for birds to only those birds bred for use in research. This final rule is intended only to make the definition of animal in the regulations consistent with the definition of animal in AWA. In the Proposed Rules section of today's Federal Register, we are publishing an advance notice of proposed rulemaking in which we solicit comments from the public to aid in the development of regulations and standards for birds not specifically bred for use in research. In addition, our advance notice of proposed rulemaking also requests public comment on issues related to the humane handling, care, treatment, and transportation of rats and mice covered by the AWA.
Agriculture Department -- Prohibition of the Use of Certain Stunning Devices Used to Immobilize Cattle During Slaughter2004-Jan-1204-624The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is amending the Federal meat inspection regulations to prohibit the use of penetrative captive bolt stunning devices that deliberately inject air into the cranial cavity of cattle. This rulemaking responds to the findings of a risk assessment on bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) conducted by the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis (referred to as the Harvard study) and is part of a series of actions that the USDA is taking to strengthen its BSE prevention programs. The Harvard study found that, owing to already ongoing Federal programs, the U.S. is highly resistant to the introduction and spread of the disease. Even so, the USDA response to BSE has always been proactive and preventive. Therefore, FSIS is taking this action to address the potential risk posed by stunning devices that may force visible pieces of brain, known as macro-emboli, into the circulatory system of stunned cattle.
Agriculture Department -- Ports Designated for Exportation of Livestock; Portland, OR2003-May-1903-12389We are amending the regulations regarding the exportation of livestock by designating Portland International Airport in Portland, OR, as a port of embarkation and B Bar C Ranch, in Gervais, OR, and Pony World Farm in Portland, OR, as export inspection facilities for that port. This rule will add a port of embarkation and export inspection facilities through which livestock may be processed for export.
Agriculture Department -- Animal Welfare; Medical Records2003-Apr-1103-8928We are proposing to amend the Animal Welfare Act regulations to require that research facilities, dealers, and exhibitors maintain medical records as part of their program of adequate veterinary care. We believe research facilities, dealers, and exhibitors should maintain medical records as a means of communication concerning the care being provided to animals and to ensure that animals receive adequate veterinary care. In addition, these records would provide a basis for the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to better assess the veterinary care programs of research facilities, dealers, and exhibitors.
Agriculture Department -- Licensing and Inspection Requirements for Dealers of Dogs Intended for Hunting, Breeding, or Security Purposes2003-Mar-1403-6161We are amending the animal welfare regulations to reflect our policy of regulating only wholesale dealers, and not retail dealers, of dogs intended for hunting, breeding, or security purposes. We currently regulate these wholesale dealers under the same regulations in place for wholesale dealers of other dogs. This action makes the regulations consistent with our policy and, therefore, clarifies licensing and inspection requirements for affected dealers of dogs intended for hunting, breeding, or security purposes.
Agriculture Department -- Origin Health Certificates for Livestock Exported From the United States2002-Mar-1502-6266We are amending the regulations pertaining to animal exports and the standards for accredited veterinarians to allow origin health certificates for animals intended for export from the United States to be valid for more than 30 days in some cases, depending on the testing requirements of the country of destination. This change will align our requirements for export origin health certificates with the testing requirements of importing countries. This action will eliminate the need for exporters to obtain another certificate when animals arrive at the port of embarkation after more than 30 days have elapsed, thereby reducing costs and delays for U.S. livestock exporters who ship animals to certain countries. This change will not increase the risk of infected or exposed animals being exported, since all animals are inspected an additional time before leaving the United States.
Interior Department -- Conferring Designated Port Status on Anchorage, Alaska2002-Mar-1302-5860The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service confers designated port status on Anchorage, Alaska, pursuant to section 9(f) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Designated port status will allow the direct importation and exportation of wildlife through this growing international port. A public hearing has been held on this designation.
Agriculture Department -- Commercial Transportation of Equines to Slaughter2001-Dec-0701-30259We are establishing regulations pertaining to the commercial transportation of equines to slaughtering facilities. These regulations fulfill our responsibility under the 1996 Farm Bill to regulate the commercial transportation of equines for slaughter by persons regularly engaged in that activity within the United States. The purpose of the regulations is to establish minimum standards to ensure the humane movement of equines to slaughtering facilities via commercial transportation. As directed by Congress, the regulations cover, among other things, the food, water, and rest provided to such equines. The regulations also require the owner/shipper of the equines to take certain actions in loading and transporting the equines and require that the owner/shipper of the equines certify that the commercial transportation meets certain requirements. In addition, the regulations prohibit the commercial transportation to slaughtering facilities of equines considered to be unfit for travel, the use of electric prods on equines in commercial transportation to slaughter, and, after 5 years, the use of double-deck trailers for commercial transportation of equines to slaughtering facilities.
Interior Department -- Conferring Designated Port Status on Anchorage, AK2001-Aug-2001-20870We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, propose to make Anchorage, Alaska, a designated port under section 9(f) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973. This action would allow the direct importation and exportation of wildlife through this growing international port. We are proposing to amend the regulations in 50 CFR Part 14 to reflect this designation. We will hold a public hearing to collect comments on this change. We also seek written comments from the public.
Agriculture Department -- Animal Welfare; Marine Mammals2001-Jan-0301-135We are amending the Animal Welfare Act regulations concerning the humane handling, care, treatment, and transportation of marine mammals in captivity. These regulations were developed by the Marine Mammal Negotiated Rulemaking Advisory Committee and are necessary to ensure that the minimum standards for the humane handling, care, treatment, and transportation of marine mammals in captivity are based on current general, industry, and scientific knowledge and experience.
Agriculture Department -- Animal Welfare; Confiscation of Animals2001-Jan-0301-57We are amending the Animal Welfare Act regulations to allow us to place animals confiscated from situations detrimental to the animals' health and well-being with a person or facility that is not licensed by or registered with the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, if the person or facility can offer a level of care equal to or exceeding that required by the regulations. The change will facilitate the relocation of confiscated animals and minimize the amount of time neglected, sick, or injured animals stay in unhealthy situations.
Agriculture Department -- Licensing and Inspection Requirements for Dealers of Dogs Intended for Hunting, Breeding, or Security Purposes2000-Dec-0400-30765We propose to amend the Animal Welfare regulations to reflect our policy of regulating wholesale dealers of dogs intended for hunting, breeding, or security purposes. We currently regulate these dealers under the same regulations in place for wholesale dealers of other dogs. This action would make the regulations consistent with our policy and would, therefore, clarify licensing and inspection requirements for affected dealers of dogs intended for hunting, breeding, or security purposes.
Agriculture Department -- Animal Welfare; Perimeter Fence Requirements; Technical Amendment2000-Nov-2800-30286In a final rule published in the Federal Register on October 18, 1999, we amended the Animal Welfare regulations to require that a perimeter fence be placed around outdoor housing facilities for marine mammals and certain other regulated animals. This document contains a correction to the list of large felines published in the final rule. Bobcats are not considered large felines and, therefore, we are removing them from the list of large felines that appears in the regulations.
Agriculture Department -- Animal Welfare; Inspection, Licensing, and Procurement of Animals2000-Aug-0400-19725We are proposing to amend the Animal Welfare Act regulations to revise and clarify the exemptions from the licensing requirements, the procedures for license applications and renewals, and restrictions upon the acquisition of dogs and cats and other animals. We believe these actions are necessary to help ensure compliance with the regulations and the Animal Welfare Act.
Agriculture Department -- Origin Health Certificates for Livestock Exported From the United States2000-Apr-1700-9492We are proposing to amend the animal export regulations to allow origin health certificates issued for animals intended for export from the United States to be valid for longer than 30 days in some cases, based on the requirements of the country of destination. Currently, origin health certificates for animals intended for export from the United States must certify that the animals were inspected within the 30 days prior to the movement for export. They must also contain information about any tests required to be conducted prior to export. Generally, the animals are inspected and tested (or samples are taken for testing) on the same day. However, some countries require or allow testing to be conducted more than 30 days prior to the date of export. This action would allow animals to be inspected for the origin health certificate as early as the required testing or sampling may be performed, in accordance with the requirements of the country of destination. We believe this can be allowed without increasing the risk of infected or exposed animals being exported, since all livestock leaving the United States by sea or air are inspected again by a U.S. Department of Agriculture veterinarian within 24 hours of export; and animals exported to Canada or Mexico by land are inspected by those nations prior to crossing the land border. This action would simplify the export process and reduce costs for exporters.
Agriculture Department -- Ports Designated for Exportation of Horses; Dayton, OH2000-Feb-1700-3833We are amending the ``Inspection and Handling of Livestock for Exportation'' regulations by adding Dayton International Airport in Dayton, OH, as a port of embarkation and Instone Air Services, Inc., as the export inspection facility for equines for that port. This action will update the regulations by adding a port of embarkation and an export inspection facility through which horses may be processed for export.
Agriculture Department -- Field Study; Definition2000-Feb-0900-2922We are amending the Animal Welfare regulations by clarifying the definition of the term field study. We will clarify that a field study cannot involve an invasive procedure, harm the animals under study, or materially alter the behavior of the animals under study. As worded prior to this final rule, the definition of field study could be interpreted to mean that a field study may include one of these situations. This action will help ensure the proper use and care of animals used in field studies.
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