Animal Foods

animal-foods
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
Health and Human Services Department -- Presiding Officer for an Appeal and Informal Hearing; Technical Amendments2017-Mar-172017-05350The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, the Agency, or we) is making revisions to Chapter I of its regulations. These revisions are necessary to reflect changes to the Agency's organizational structure, including the dissolution of the Regional Food and Drug Director position. The revisions replace references to the Regional Food and Drug Director, who is designated to preside over administrative appeals and at informal hearings on appeal, with references to Office of Regulatory Affairs Program Directors. The rule does not impose any new regulatory requirements on affected parties. This action is editorial in nature and is intended to improve the accuracy of the Agency's regulations.
Health and Human Services Department -- Substances Generally Recognized as Safe2016-Aug-172016-19164The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is issuing a final rule that amends and clarifies the criteria in our regulations for when the use of a substance in food for humans or animals is not subject to the premarket approval requirements of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) because the substance is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) under the conditions of its intended use. We also are amending our regulations to replace the voluntary GRAS affirmation petition process with a voluntary notification procedure under which any person may notify us of a conclusion that a substance is GRAS under the conditions of its intended use. The clarified criteria for GRAS status should help stakeholders draw more informed conclusions about whether the intended conditions of use of a substance in food for humans or animals complies with the FD&C Act, and the notification procedure will enable stakeholders to be aware of whether we have questioned the basis of a conclusion of GRAS status.
Health and Human Services Department -- Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition Library Address; Technical Amendments2016-Feb-032016-01787The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is amending certain regulations to update the location of references cited in our food regulations. We are taking this action to reflect the transfer of those references from our facility in College Park, MD, to our library at our main campus in Silver Spring, MD. We also are updating certain regulations to reflect the current names for specific FDA offices.
Health and Human Services Department -- Current Good Manufacturing Practice, Hazard Analysis, and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Food for Animals; Technical Amendment2016-Jan-222016-01290The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is amending a final rule that published in the Federal Register of September 17, 2015. That final rule established requirements for domestic and foreign facilities required to register under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for current good manufacturing practice, hazard analysis, and risk-based preventive controls for food for animals. The final rule published with some editorial and inadvertent errors. This document corrects those errors.
Health and Human Services Department -- Current Good Manufacturing Practice, Hazard Analysis, and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Food for Animals2015-Sep-172015-21921The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is adding regulations for the Current Good Manufacturing Practice, Hazard Analysis, and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Food for Animals. These regulations will, for the first time, establish requirements for the current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) for food for animals. In addition, we are adding requirements for certain domestic and foreign animal food facilities to establish and implement hazard analysis and risk-based preventive controls for food for animals. We are taking this action to provide greater assurance that animal food is safe and will not cause illness or injury to humans and animals and to implement new statutory provisions in the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). The rule is intended to build an animal food safety system for the future that makes modern science- and risk-based preventive controls the norm across all sectors of the animal food system.
Health and Human Services Department -- Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Food for Animals2014-Sep-292014-22445The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is proposing to amend our 2013 proposed rule for Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP) and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Food for Animals. In that 2013 proposed rule, we proposed to add CGMP requirements for animal food and to add requirements for certain domestic and foreign facilities to establish and implement hazard analysis and risk-based preventive controls for food for animals. We are taking this action because the input we have received from public comments has led to significant changes in our current thinking on certain key provisions of this proposed rule. We are reopening the comment period only with respect to specific issues identified in this proposed rule.
Health and Human Services Department -- Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Food for Animals2013-Oct-292013-25126The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing regulations for domestic and foreign facilities that are required to register under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) to establish requirements for current good manufacturing practice in manufacturing, processing, packing, and holding of animal food. FDA also is proposing regulations to require that certain facilities establish and implement hazard analysis and risk-based preventive controls for food for animals. FDA is taking this action to provide greater assurance that animal food is safe and will not cause illness or injury to animals or humans and is intended to build an animal food safety system for the future that makes modern, science and risk-based preventive controls the norm across all sectors of the animal food system.
Health and Human Services Department -- Irradiation in the Production, Processing, and Handling of Animal Feed and Pet Food; Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for Irradiation of Poultry Feed and Poultry Feed Ingredients; Correction2013-Jun-102013-13648The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is correcting a document amending the regulations for irradiation of animal feed and pet food that appeared in the Federal Register of May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27303). That document used incorrect style for the strength units describing radiation sources. This correction is being made to improve the accuracy of the animal drug regulations.
Health and Human Services Department -- Irradiation in the Production, Processing, and Handling of Animal Feed and Pet Food; Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for Irradiation of Poultry Feed and Poultry Feed Ingredients2013-May-102013-11147The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the regulations for irradiation of animal feed and pet food to provide for the safe use of electron beam and x-ray sources for irradiation of poultry feed and poultry feed ingredients. This action is in response to a food additive petition filed by Sadex Corp.
Health and Human Services Department -- Animal Food Labeling; Declaration of Certifiable Color Additives2011-Nov-172011-29701The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations regarding the declaration of certified color additives on the labels of animal food including animal feeds and pet foods. FDA is issuing a final regulation in response to the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 (the 1990 amendments), which amended the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) by requiring, among other things, the listing on food labels of the common or usual names of all color additives required to be certified by FDA. An additional purpose of this final rule is to make these regulations consistent with the regulations regarding the declaration of certified color additives on the labels of human food. The final rule also suggests appropriate terminology for the declaration of certification-exempt color additives on the labels of animal food.
Health and Human Services Department -- Reporting Information Regarding Falsification of Data2010-Feb-192010-3123The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to amend its regulations to require sponsors to report information indicating that any person has, or may have, engaged in the falsification of data in the course of reporting study results, or in the course of proposing, designing, performing, recording, supervising, or reviewing studies that involve human subjects or animal subjects conducted by or on behalf of a sponsor or relied on by a sponsor. A sponsor would be required to report this information to the appropriate FDA center promptly, but no later than 45 calendar days after the sponsor becomes aware of the information. This proposal is necessary because ambiguity in the current reporting scheme has caused confusion among sponsors. The proposed rule is intended to help ensure the validity of data that the agency receives in support of applications and petitions for FDA product approvals and authorization of certain labeling claims and to protect research subjects.
Health and Human Services Department -- Substances Prohibited From Use in Animal Food or Feed2008-Apr-2508-1180The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the agency's regulations to prohibit the use of certain cattle origin materials in the food or feed of all animals. These materials include the following: The entire carcass of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)-positive cattle; the brains and spinal cords from cattle 30 months of age and older; the entire carcass of cattle not inspected and passed for human consumption that are 30 months of age or older from which brains and spinal cords were not removed; tallow that is derived from BSE-positive cattle; tallow that is derived from other materials prohibited by this rule that contains more than 0.15 percent insoluble impurities; and mechanically separated beef that is derived from the materials prohibited by this rule. These measures will further strengthen existing safeguards against BSE.
Health and Human Services Department -- Index of Legally Marketed Unapproved New Animal Drugs for Minor Species2007-Dec-067-23580The Minor Use and Minor Species Animal Health Act of 2004 (MUMS act) amended the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) to authorize the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA, the agency) to establish new regulatory procedures that provide incentives intended to make more drugs legally available to veterinarians and animal owners for the treatment of minor animal species and uncommon diseases in major animal species. At this time, FDA is issuing final regulations to implement section 572 of the act entitled ``Index of Legally Marketed Unapproved New Animal Drugs for Minor Species.'' These regulations establish administrative procedures and criteria for index listing a new animal drug for use in a minor species. Such indexing provides a basis for legally marketing an unapproved new animal drug intended for use in a minor species.
Health and Human Services Department -- Premarket Notice Concerning Bioengineered Foods2001-Jan-1801-1046The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to require the submission to the agency of data and information regarding plant- derived bioengineered foods that would be consumed by humans or animals. FDA is proposing that this submission be made at least 120 days prior to the commercial distribution of such foods. FDA is taking this action to ensure that it has the appropriate amount of information about bioengineered foods to help to ensure that all market entry decisions by the industry are made consistently and in full compliance with the law. The proposed action will permit the agency to assess on an ongoing basis whether plant-derived bioengineered foods comply with the standards of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).
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