Air Taxis

air-taxis
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
TitlePublishedFR Doc.Description
Transportation Department -- Revisions to Operational Requirements for the Use of Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS) and to Pilot Compartment View Requirements for Vision Systems; Correcting Amendment2018-Mar-122018-04888The FAA is correcting a final rule published on December 13, 2016. In that rule, the FAA amended its regulations to allow operators to use an enhanced flight vision system (EFVS) in lieu of natural vision to continue descending from 100 feet above the touchdown zone elevation (TDZE) to the runway and to land on certain straight-in instrument approach procedures (IAPs) under instrument flight rules (IFR). As part of the final rule, the FAA inadvertently removed some regulatory text. This document corrects that error. Additionally, this document corrects the same error in an amendatory instruction of the EFVS final rule to ensure the correction to the regulation is retained when the regulation is subsequently amended on March 13, 2018.
Transportation Department -- Aviation Safety Organization Changes2018-Mar-052018-03374The FAA Aircraft Certification Service (AIR) and Flight Standards Service (AFS) have reorganized to align with functional organization design concepts. The AIR reorganization included eliminating product directorates and restructuring and re-designating field offices. The AFS reorganization included eliminating geographic regions, realigning headquarters organizations, and restructuring field offices. Currently, various rules in the Code of Federal Regulations refer to specific AIR and AFS offices that are obsolete after the reorganizations. This rule replaces specific references with generic references not dependent on any particular office structure. This rule does not impose any new obligations and is only intended to eliminate any confusion about with whom regulated entities and other persons should interact when complying with these various rules in the future.
Transportation Department -- Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 Helicopter Operations; Technical Amendment2018-Jan-102018-00285The FAA is correcting a final rule published on February 21, 2014. In that rule, the FAA amended its regulations to improve safety in helicopter air ambulance and commercial helicopter operations. This document removes an incorrect cross-reference and makes corresponding revisions.
Transportation Department -- Incorporation by Reference of ICAO Annex 2; Removal of Outdated North Atlantic Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications2017-Aug-222017-17674This rule better aligns FAA regulations regarding the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) with the relevant International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards. The ICAO NAT Region is transitioning from the decades-old MNPS navigation specification to a more modern, Performance-Based Navigation (PBN) specification. This rule also incorporates by reference the current version of Annex 2 (``Rules of the Air'') to the Convention on International Civil Aviation (the ``Chicago Convention''), hereinafter referred to as ``ICAO Annex 2,'' in the FAA's regulations.
Transportation Department -- Removal of References to Obsolete Navigation Systems; Technical Amendment2017-Jul-252017-15517The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is removing references to the obsolete navigation systems Loran, Omega and Consol that currently appear in FAA regulations.
Transportation Department -- Transparency of Airline Ancillary Service Fees2017-Jan-192017-00904This SNPRM proposes to require air carriers, foreign air carriers, and ticket agents to clearly disclose to consumers at all points of sale customer-specific fee information, or itinerary-specific information if a customer elects not to provide customer-specific information, for a first checked bag, a second checked bag, and one carry-on bag wherever fare and schedule information is provided to consumers. This SNPRM further proposes to require each covered carrier to provide useable, current, and accurate (but not transactable) baggage fee information to all ticket agents that receive and distribute the carrier's fare and schedule information, including Global Distribution Systems and metasearch entities. On covered carrier and ticket agent Web sites, the SNPRM would require the baggage fee information to be disclosed at the first point in a search process where a fare is listed in connection with a specific flight itinerary, adjacent to the fare. The SNPRM would permit carriers and ticket agents to allow customers to opt-out of receiving the baggage fee information when using their Web sites.
Transportation Department -- Revisions to Operational Requirements for the Use of Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS) and to Pilot Compartment View Requirements for Vision Systems2016-Dec-132016-28714Prior to this final rule, persons could only use an Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) in lieu of natural vision to descend below the decision altitude, decision height, or minimum descent altitude (DA/DH or MDA) down to 100 feet above the touchdown zone elevation (TDZE) using certain straight-in landing instrument approach procedures (IAPs). This final rule permits operators to use an EFVS in lieu of natural vision to continue descending from 100 feet above the TDZE to the runway and to land on certain straight-in IAPs under instrument flight rules (IFR). This final rule also revises and relocates the regulations that permit operators to use an EFVS in lieu of natural vision to descend to 100 feet above the TDZE using certain straight-in IAPs. Additionally, this final rule addresses provisions that permit operators who conduct EFVS operations under parts 121, 125, or 135 to use EFVS-equipped aircraft to dispatch, release, or takeoff under IFR, and revises the regulations for those operators to initiate and continue an approach, when the destination airport weather is below authorized visibility minimums for the runway of intended landing. This final rule establishes pilot training and recent flight experience requirements for operators who use EFVS in lieu of natural vision to descend below the DA/DH or MDA. EFVS-equipped aircraft conducting operations to touchdown and rollout are required to meet additional airworthiness requirements. This final rule also revises pilot compartment view certification requirements for vision systems using a transparent display surface located in the pilot's outside field of view. The final rule takes advantage of advanced vision capabilities, thereby achieving the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) goals of increasing access, efficiency, and throughput at many airports when low visibility is the limiting factor. Additionally, it enables EFVS operations in reduced visibilities on a greater number of approach procedure types while maintaining an equivalent level of safety.
Transportation Department -- Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections III2016-Nov-032016-26178The Department of Transportation is issuing a third ``Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections'' final rule to enhance protections for air travelers and to improve the air travel environment as follows: Expanding the pool of reporting carriers for service quality data; requiring reporting carriers to include service quality data for their domestic scheduled flights operated by their code-share partners; enhancing the Department's code-share disclosure regulation to codify the statutory requirement that carriers and ticket agents must disclose any code-share arrangements on their Web sites on the first display presented in response to a search of a requested itinerary for each itinerary involving a code-share operation; and prohibiting undisclosed biasing based on carrier identity by carriers and ticket agents in any electronic displays of the fare, schedule or availability information of multiple carriers. The amendments to the reporting requirements in this rule will ensure that the Department obtains and provides to the public expanded and enhanced service quality data from the airlines. The provision to strengthen the Department's code-share disclosure rule will also enhance air travel consumer protection. Additionally, this final rule corrects certain drafting errors and makes minor changes to the Department's second Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections rule to better reflect the Department's intent. Other topics covered by the proposed rule that are not addressed by this final rule will be addressed in two separate rulemakings. Specifically, the Department will be issuing a Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (SNPRM) to seek additional information on the disclosure of fees for basic ancillary services to consumers at all points of sale. The remaining topics discussed in the 2014 notice of proposed rulemaking (e.g., customer service commitments by large ticket agents, prohibition on post-purchase price increases for ancillary services) will be addressed in another final rule that the Department plans to issue at a later date.
Transportation Department -- Incorporation by Reference of ICAO Annex 2; Removal of Outdated North Atlantic Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications2016-Sep-292016-22798This rulemaking proposes to harmonize the FAA's regulations regarding the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) with those of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). ICAO's NAT Region is transitioning from the decades-old MNPS navigation specification to a more modern, Performance-Based Navigation (PBN) specification. This proposed rule would also correct and update the incorporation by reference of ICAO Annex 2 in the FAA's regulations.
Transportation Department -- MU-2B Series Airplane Training Requirements Update2016-Sep-072016-21356This action relocates and updates the content of SFAR No. 108 to the newly created subpart N of part 91 in order to improve the safety of operating the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) MU-2B series airplane. SFAR No. 108 will be eliminated from the Code of Federal Regulations on November 7, 2017, after which time all MU-2B operators must comply with this subpart. The FAA is relocating the training program from the SFAR No. 108 appendices to advisory material in order to allow the FAA to update policy while ensuring significant training adjustments still go through notice-and-comment rulemaking. The FAA is also correcting and updating several inaccurate maneuver profiles to reflect current FAA training philosophy and adding new FAA procedures not previously part of the MU-2B training under SFAR No. 108. This rule will require all MU-2B training programs to meet the requirements of this subpart and to be approved by the FAA to ensure safety is maintained. As a result of this action, operators, training providers, and safety officials will have more timely access to standardized, accurate training material.
Transportation Department -- Acceptance Criteria for Portable Oxygen Concentrators Used On Board Aircraft2016-May-242016-11918This final rule replaces the existing process by which the Federal Aviation Administration (Agency or FAA) approves portable oxygen concentrators (POC) for use on board aircraft in air carrier operations, commercial operations, and certain other operations using large aircraft. The FAA currently assesses each POC make and model on a case-by-case basis and if the FAA determines that a particular POC is safe for use on board an aircraft, the FAA conducts rulemaking to identify the specific POC model in an FAA regulation. This final rule replaces the current process and allows passengers to use a POC on board an aircraft if the POC satisfies certain acceptance criteria and bears a label indicating conformance with the acceptance criteria. The labeling requirement only affects POCs intended for use on board aircraft that were not previously approved for use on aircraft by the FAA. Additionally, this rulemaking will eliminate redundant operational requirements and paperwork requirements related to the physician's statement. As a result, this rulemaking will reduce burdens for POC manufacturers, passengers who use POCs while traveling, and affected aircraft operators. This final rule also makes conforming amendments to the Department of Transportation's (Department or DOT) rule implementing the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) to require carriers to accept all POC models that meet FAA acceptance criteria as detailed in this rule.
Transportation Department -- Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations; Technical Amendment2016-Jan-042015-32998The FAA is correcting a final rule published on July 15, 2013. In that rule, the FAA amended its regulations to create new certification and qualification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations. The FAA unintentionally required without notice and comment that if a certificate holder conducting part 135 operations who has voluntarily chosen and been authorized to comply with the part 121 training and qualification requirements, a pilot serving as a second in command in part 135 for that certificate holder is required to have an airline transport pilot certificate and an aircraft type rating. This document corrects those errors and makes several additional miscellaneous corrections to part 61 and a cross-reference error in part 121.
Transportation Department -- Acceptance Criteria for Portable Oxygen Concentrators Used On Board Aircraft2014-Sep-192014-21964This rulemaking would replace Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 106 with acceptance criteria for portable oxygen concentrators to be used by passengers in air carrier operations, commercial operations and certain other operations using large aircraft. Currently, the agency assesses each portable oxygen concentrator on a case-by-case basis to determine whether it is safe for use on board aircraft. If the agency determines that a portable oxygen concentrator is safe for use on board aircraft, the specific model is identified in regulations. This rulemaking would replace the burdensome approval process with acceptance criteria and a requirement for manufacturers to demonstrate compliance by affixing a label on the exterior of the portable oxygen concentrator applied in a manner that ensures it will remain affixed for the life of the device. The proposed acceptance criteria and labeling requirement would only affect portable oxygen concentrators intended for use on board aircraft. Portable oxygen concentrators currently approved for use on board aircraft would not be affected by this proposal and will be listed in this rule as approved. This rulemaking would also eliminate redundant requirements and paperwork requirements that are not necessary for aviation safety thereby reducing burdens for portable oxygen concentrator manufacturers, passengers who use portable oxygen concentrators while traveling, and aircraft operators conducting air carrier operations, commercial operations or certain operations using large aircraft.
Transportation Department -- Transparency of Airline Ancillary Fees and Other Consumer Protection Issues2014-May-232014-11993The Department is seeking comment on a number of proposals to enhance protections for air travelers and to improve the air travel environment, including a proposal to clarify and codify the Department's interpretation of the statutory definition of ``ticket agent.'' By codifying the Department's interpretation, the Department intends to ensure that all entities that manipulate fare, schedule, and availability information in response to consumer inquiries and receive a form of compensation are adhering to all of the Department's consumer protection requirements that are applicable to ticket agents such as the full-fare advertising rule and the code-share disclosure rule. This NPRM also proposes to require airlines and ticket agents to disclose at all points of sale the fees for certain basic ancillary services associated with the air transportation consumers are buying or considering buying. Currently, some consumers may be unable to understand the true cost of travel while searching for airfares, due to insufficient information concerning fees for ancillary services. The Department is addressing this problem by proposing that carriers share real-time, accurate fee information for certain optional services with ticket agents. Other proposals in this NPRM to enhance airline passenger protections include: Expanding the pool of ``reporting'' carriers; requiring enhanced reporting by mainline carriers for their domestic code-share partner operations; requiring large travel agents to adopt minimum customer service standards; codifying the statutory requirement that carriers and ticket agents disclose any airline code-share arrangements on their Web sites; and prohibiting unfair and deceptive practices such as undisclosed biasing in schedule and fare displays and post-purchase price increases. The Department is also considering whether to require ticket agents to disclose the carriers whose tickets they sell in order to avoid having consumers mistakenly believe they are searching all possible flight options for a particular city-pair market when in fact there may be other options available. Additionally, this NPRM would correct drafting errors and make minor changes to the Department's second Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections rule to conform to guidance issued by the Department's Office of Aviation Enforcement and Proceedings (Enforcement Office) regarding its interpretation of the rule.
Transportation Department -- Extension of Effective Date for the Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 Helicopter Operations Final Rule2014-Apr-212014-09034The FAA is delaying the effective date of the Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 Helicopter Operations final rule published on February 21, 2014. In that rule, the FAA amended its regulations to revise the helicopter air ambulance, commercial helicopter, and general aviation helicopter operating requirements. The April 22, 2014 effective date does not provide an adequate amount of time for the affected certificate holders to implement the new requirements. By extending the effective date to April 22, 2015, the affected certificate holders will have sufficient time to implement the new requirements. This action will only affect the effective date of the provisions of the rule scheduled to take effect April 22, 2014. Other provisions in the rule with specified compliance dates will not be affected.
Transportation Department -- Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 Helicopter Operations2014-Feb-212014-03689This final rule addresses helicopter air ambulance, commercial helicopter, and general aviation helicopter operations. To address an increase in fatal helicopter air ambulance accidents, the FAA is implementing new operational procedures and additional equipment requirements for helicopter air ambulance operations. This final rule also increases safety for commercial helicopter operations by revising requirements for equipment, pilot testing, and alternate airports. It increases weather minimums for all general aviation helicopter operations. Many of these requirements address National Transportation Safety Board safety recommendations, and are already found in FAA guidance. Today's changes are intended to provide certificate holders and pilots with additional tools and procedures that will aid in preventing accidents.
Transportation Department -- Minimum Altitudes for Use of Autopilots2014-Feb-032014-02123This rulemaking amends and harmonizes minimum altitudes for use of autopilots for transport category airplanes; it also enables the operational use of advanced autopilot and navigation systems by incorporating the capabilities of current and future autopilots, flight guidance systems, and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) guidance systems while protecting the continued use of legacy systems at current autopilot minimum use altitudes. Additionally, this final rule implements a performance-based approach, using the certified capabilities of autopilot systems as established by the Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) or as approved by the Administrator.
Transportation Department -- Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations; Technical Amendment2013-Dec-242013-30603The FAA is correcting a final rule published on July 15, 2013 (78 FR 42324). In that rule, the FAA amended its regulations to create new certification and qualification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations. The FAA unintentionally required without notice and comment a pilot serving as a second in command in part 135 commuter operations to have an airline transport pilot certificate and an aircraft type rating, and a pilot in command in part 135 commuter operations to have 1,000 hours of air carrier experience. This document corrects those errors and makes several additional miscellaneous corrections.
Transportation Department -- Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in Air Travel: Accessibility of Web Sites and Automated Kiosks at U.S. Airports2013-Nov-122013-26749The Department of Transportation is amending its rules implementing the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) to require U.S. air carriers and foreign air carriers to make their Web sites that market air transportation to the general public in the United States accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, the Department is amending its rule that prohibits unfair and deceptive practices and unfair methods of competition to require ticket agents that are not small businesses to disclose and offer Web-based fares to passengers who indicate that they are unable to use the agents' Web sites due to a disability. DOT is also requiring U.S. and foreign air carriers to ensure that kiosks meet detailed accessibility design standards specified in this rule until a total of at least 25 percent of automated kiosks in each location at the airport meet these standards. In addition, the Department is amending its rule implementing the Rehabilitation Act to require U.S. airport operators meet the same accessibility standards.
Transportation Department -- Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations2013-Jul-152013-16849This action creates new certification and qualification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations. As a result of this action, a second in command (first officer) in domestic, flag, and supplemental operations must now hold an airline transport pilot certificate and an airplane type rating for the aircraft to be flown. An airline transport pilot certificate requires that a pilot be 23 years of age and have 1,500 hours total time as a pilot. Pilots with fewer than 1,500 flight hours may qualify for a restricted privileges airline transport pilot certificate beginning at 21 years of age if they are a military-trained pilot, have a bachelor's degree with an aviation major, or have an associate's degree with an aviation major. The restricted privileges airline transport pilot certificate will also be available to pilots with 1,500 flight hours who are at least 21 years of age. This restricted privileges airline transport pilot certificate allows a pilot to serve as second in command in domestic, flag, and supplemental operations not requiring more than two pilot flightcrew members. This rule also retains the second-class medical certification requirement for a second in command in part 121 operations. Pilots serving as an air carrier pilot in command (captain) must have, in addition to an airline transport pilot certificate, at least 1,000 flight hours in air carrier operations. This rule also adds to the eligibility requirements for an airline transport pilot certificate with an airplane category multiengine class rating or an airline transport pilot certificate obtained concurrently with a type rating. To receive an airline transport pilot certificate with a multiengine class rating a pilot must have 50 hours of multiengine flight experience and must have completed a new FAA-approved Airline Transport Pilot Certification Training Program. This new training program will include academic coursework and training in a flight simulation training device. These requirements will ensure that a pilot has the proper qualifications, training, and experience before entering an air carrier environment as a pilot flightcrew member.
Transportation Department -- Revisions to Operational Requirements for the Use of Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS) and to Pilot Compartment View Requirements for Vision Systems2013-Jun-112013-13454The FAA is proposing to permit operators to use an Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) in lieu of natural vision to continue descending from 100 feet above the touchdown zone elevation to the runway and land on certain straight-in instrument approach procedures under instrument flight rules (IFR). This proposal would also permit certain operators using EFVS-equipped aircraft to dispatch, release, or takeoff under IFR, and to initiate and continue an approach, when the destination airport weather is below authorized visibility minimums for the runway of intended landing. Under this proposal, pilot training, recent flight experience, and proficiency would be required for operators who use EFVS in lieu of natural vision to descend below decision altitude, decision height, or minimum descent altitude. EFVS- equipped aircraft conducting operations to touchdown and rollout would be required to meet additional airworthiness requirements. This proposal would also revise pilot compartment view certification requirements for vision systems using a transparent display surface located in the pilot's outside view. The proposal would take advantage of advanced vision capabilities thereby achieving the NextGen goals of increasing access, efficiency, and throughput at many airports when low visibility is the limiting factor. Additionally, it would enable EFVS operations in reduced visibilities on a greater number of approach procedure types while maintaining an equivalent level of safety.
Transportation Department -- Minimum Altitudes for Use of Autopilots2012-Dec-042012-29274The FAA proposes to amend and harmonize minimum altitudes for use of autopilots for transport category airplanes. The proposed rule would enable the operational use of advanced autopilot and navigation systems by incorporating the capabilities of new and future autopilots, flight guidance systems, and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) guidance systems while protecting the continued use of legacy systems at current autopilot minimum use altitudes. The proposed rule would accomplish this through a performance-based approach, using the certified capabilities of autopilot systems as established by the Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) or as approved by the Administrator.
Transportation Department -- Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations2012-Feb-292012-4627This action would create new certification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations. The proposal would require a second in command (first officer) in part 121 operations to hold an airline transport pilot (ATP) certificate and a type rating for the aircraft to be flown. The FAA proposes to allow pilots with an aviation degree or military pilot experience to obtain an ATP certificate with restricted privileges with fewer than 1,500 hours total time as a pilot. The proposal also would require at least 1,000 flight hours in air carrier operations in order to serve as a pilot in command in part 121 air carrier operations. Finally, the FAA is proposing to modify an ATP certificate with an airplane category multiengine class rating or type rating to require 50 hours of multiengine flight experience and completion of a new FAA-approved ATP Certification Training Program for a Multiengine Class Rating or Type Rating that would include academic training and training in a flight simulation training device. These proposed requirements would ensure that pilots have proper qualifications and experience in difficult operational conditions and in a multicrew environment prior to serving as pilot flightcrew members in air carrier operations.
Transportation Department -- FAA-Approved Portable Oxygen Concentrators; Technical Amendment2012-Jan-272012-1830The FAA is amending regulations relating to operating rules for FAA approved portable oxygen concentrators (POC) onboard aircraft. This document updates the names of two manufacturers of approved POCs listed in the Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR).
Transportation Department -- Training and Qualification Requirements for Check Airmen and Flight Instructors; Technical Amendment2011-Jun-162011-14999The FAA is amending its regulations regarding separate requirements for check airmen who check only in flight simulators and flight instructors who instruct only in flight simulators. This document corrects minor technical errors in the codified text of those regulations.
Transportation Department -- Qualification, Service, and Use of Crewmembers and Aircraft Dispatchers2011-May-202011-10554On January 12, 2009, the FAA published a notice of proposed rulemaking on qualification, service, and use of crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers. Because of the complexity of the issues and the concerns raised by commenters, the FAA is issuing this supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking. The FAA proposes to amend the regulations for crewmember and aircraft dispatcher training programs in domestic, flag, and supplemental operations. The proposed regulations enhance traditional training programs by requiring the use of flight simulation training devices for flightcrew members and including additional training and evaluation requirements for all crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers in areas that are critical to safety. The proposal also reorganizes and revises the qualification, training, and evaluation requirements. The proposed changes are intended to contribute significantly to reducing aviation accidents.
Transportation Department -- Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections2011-Apr-252011-9736The Department of Transportation is issuing a final rule to improve the air travel environment for consumers by: Increasing the number of carriers that are required to adopt tarmac delay contingency plans and the airports at which they must adhere to the plan's terms; increasing the number of carriers that are required to report tarmac delay information to the Department; expanding the group of carriers that are required to adopt, follow, and audit customer service plans and establishing minimum standards for the subjects all carriers must cover in such plans; adding carriers to those required to include their contingency plans and customer service plans on their websites; increasing the number of carriers that must respond to consumer complaints; enhancing protections afforded passengers in oversales situations, including increasing the maximum denied boarding compensation airlines must pay to passengers bumped from flights; strengthening, codifying and clarifying the Department's enforcement policies concerning air transportation price advertising practices; requiring carriers to notify consumers of optional fees related to air transportation and of increases in baggage fees; prohibiting post- purchase price increases; requiring carriers to provide passengers timely notice of flight status changes such as delays and cancellations; and prohibiting carriers from imposing unfair contract of carriage choice-of-forum provisions. The Department is taking this action to strengthen the rights of air travelers in the event of oversales, flight cancellations and delays, ensure that passengers have accurate and adequate information to make informed decisions when selecting flights, prohibit unfair and deceptive practices such as post-purchase price increases and contract of carriage choice-of-forum provisions, and to ensure responsiveness to consumer complaints.
Transportation Department -- Removal of Expired Federal Aviation Administration Regulations and References2011-Feb-162011-3467The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is making minor technical changes to its regulations by removing expired Special Federal Aviation Regulations (SFARs) and cross-references, as well as other expired or obsolete regulations. None of these changes are substantive in nature since the regulations in question have expired and are not currently in effect. This technical amendment is necessary to update our regulations. The rule will not impose any additional burden or restriction on persons or organizations affected by these regulations.
Transportation Department -- Operations Specifications2011-Feb-102011-2834This amendment clarifies and standardizes the rules for applications by foreign air carriers and foreign persons for part 129 operations specifications and establishes new standards for amendment, suspension, and termination of those operations specifications. In addition, the FAA has moved definitions currently contained in a subpart to a separate part for clarity with no substantive changes to the definitions. The amendment also applies to foreign persons operating U.S.-registered aircraft in common carriage solely outside the United States. This action is necessary to update the process for issuing operations specifications and establishes a regulatory basis for current practices, such as amending, terminating, or suspending operations specifications.
Transportation Department -- Air Ambulance and Commercial Helicopter Operations, Part 91 Helicopter Operations, and Part 135 Aircraft Operations; Safety Initiatives and Miscellaneous Amendments2010-Oct-122010-24862This proposed rule addresses air ambulance and commercial helicopter operations, part 91 helicopter operations, and load manifest requirements for all part 135 aircraft. From 2002 to 2008, there has been an increase in fatal helicopter air ambulance accidents. To address these safety concerns, the FAA is proposing to implement operational procedures and require additional equipment on board helicopter air ambulances. Many of these proposed requirements currently are found in agency guidance publications and would address National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) safety recommendations. Some of these safety concerns are not unique to the helicopter air ambulance industry and affect all commercial helicopter operations. Accordingly, the FAA also is proposing to amend regulations pertaining to all commercial helicopter operations conducted under part 135 to include equipment requirements, pilot training, and alternate airport weather minima. The changes are intended to provide certificate holders and pilots with additional tools and procedures that will aid in preventing accidents.
Transportation Department -- Submitting Airline Data via the Internet2010-Jul-162010-16637The U.S. Department of Transportation requires U.S. air carriers to submit their recurrent financial, traffic, operational and consumer data reports electronically via the Internet using the comma separated value (CSV) file format or a PDF file for reports that are not entered into a database such as signed certifications, transmittal letters, and annual reports. This rule will enhance security of the data submissions, eliminate air carriers' fax and mailing costs, eliminate the need for the Department to manually enter hardcopy data submissions, and provide reporting air carriers with immediate notification and a receipt from the Department that the report was received. This action is taken on the Department's initiative.
Transportation Department -- Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections2010-Jun-082010-13572The Department of Transportation is proposing to improve the
Transportation Department -- Operations Specifications2010-May-072010-10890This proposed rule would clarify and standardize the rules for applications by foreign air carriers and foreign persons for operations specifications and establish new standards for amendment, suspension or termination of those operations specifications. The proposed rule would also apply to foreign persons operating U.S.-registered aircraft in common carriage solely outside the United States. This action is necessary to update the process for issuing operations specifications, and it will establish a regulatory basis for current practices, such as amending, terminating or suspending operations specifications.
Transportation Department -- Extension of the Compliance Date for Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations2010-Apr-052010-7660On March 7, 2008, the FAA published a final rule titled ``Revisions to Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations.'' The rule required certain upgrades of cockpit voice recorder and digital flight data recorder equipment on certain aircraft beginning April 7, 2010. That compliance date is being changed for certain requirements on certain aircraft.
Transportation Department -- Drug and Alcohol Testing Program; Correction2010-Jan-202010-908The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is correcting its drug and alcohol testing regulations published on May 14, 2009. The FAA inadvertently excluded necessary wording within the text of two separate definitions; added wording to the sections describing refusals to submit to drug or alcohol tests; directed readers to an incorrect subpart for a referenced definition; omitted a cross reference to a list of applicable regulations; and added wording when describing an operator. This rule corrects those inadvertent errors and includes other minor editorial corrections. These corrections will not impose any additional requirements on operators affected by these regulations.
Transportation Department -- Extension of the Compliance Date for Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations2010-Jan-072010-31On March 7, 2008, the FAA published a final rule titled ``Revisions to Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations.'' The rule required certain upgrades of digital flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder equipment on certain aircraft beginning April 7, 2010. The FAA is proposing to change that compliance date for some aircraft as outlined in this notice. This action follows petitions from several aircraft manufacturers and industry organizations indicating an inability to comply with the April 2010 requirement.
Transportation Department -- Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections2009-Dec-309-30615The Department of Transportation is issuing a final rule to enhance airline passenger protections in the following ways: By requiring air carriers to adopt contingency plans for lengthy tarmac delays and to publish those plans on their Web sites; by requiring air carriers to respond to consumer problems; by deeming continued delays on a flight that is chronically late to be unfair and deceptive in violation of 49 U.S.C. 41712; by requiring air carriers to publish information on flight delays on their Web sites; and by requiring air carriers to adopt customer service plans, to publish those plans on their Web sites, and audit their own compliance with their plans. The Department took this action on its own initiative in response to the many instances when passengers have been subject to delays on the airport tarmac for lengthy periods and also in response to the high incidence of flight delays and other consumer problems.
Transportation Department -- Removal of Regulations Allowing for Polished Frost2009-Dec-019-28431The FAA is removing certain provisions in its regulations that allow for operations with ``polished frost'' (i.e., frost polished to make it smooth) on the wings and stabilizing and control surfaces of aircraft. The rule is expected to increase safety by not allowing operations with ``polished frost,'' which the FAA has determined increases the risk of unsafe flight.
Transportation Department -- Manual Requirements2009-Aug-049-18602The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is making a minor technical change to a final rule published in the Federal Register on February 2, 2005. This final rule established new manual requirements for aging aircraft under 14 CFR part 135. In the final rule, the FAA inadvertently changed one of the regulatory references in Sec. 135.427(a).
Transportation Department -- Revisions to Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations2009-Jul-099-16056The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is amending a final rule published in the Federal Register on March 7, 2008. That final rule amended cockpit voice recorder and digital flight data recorder regulations affecting certain air carriers, operators, and aircraft. In that final rule, the FAA failed to include conforming amendments to certain operating rules to ensure that certain new requirements apply to only newly manufactured aircraft.
Transportation Department -- Drug and Alcohol Testing Program2009-May-149-11289This action amends the FAA's drug and alcohol regulations to place them in a new part. The FAA is not making any substantive changes to the drug and alcohol regulations in this rulemaking.
Transportation Department -- Communication and Area Navigation Equipment (RNAV) Operations in Remote Locations and Mountainous Terrain2009-May-019-10089This final rule amends the regulations to allow the use of the published Obstacle Departure Procedures (ODP) or an alternative procedure or route assigned by Air Traffic Control (ATC). Also, this final rule amends the requirements to facilitate compliance and accurately reflect operating conditions in areas in which the terrain impedes communications. In August 2007, the FAA issued regulations relating to ODPs and Area Navigation equipment (RNAV). Among the amendments, the FAA prohibited Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) takeoffs from airports with published ODPs for the takeoff runway to be used unless the pilot uses the ODP for that runway. Following publication of the rule, the FAA determined that this requirement is unnecessarily restrictive because it prohibits pilots from using Standard Instrument Departure (SID) procedures and air traffic control (ATC) radar vectoring. The final rule also amended the communication and navigation equipment requirements for aircraft operations under Visual Flight Rules (VFR). The FAA determined that compliance with the new communications requirements may not be possible in remote locations and areas of mountainous terrain. This final rule is adopted without prior notice and public comment, but the public may comment prior to the effective date of the rule.
Transportation Department -- Qualification, Service, and Use of Crewmembers and Aircraft Dispatchers2009-Jan-128-29584The FAA proposes to amend the regulations for crewmember and dispatcher training programs in domestic, flag, and supplemental operations. The proposed regulations enhance traditional training programs by requiring the use of flight simulation training devices for flight crewmembers and including additional training requirements in areas that are critical to safety. The proposal also reorganizes and revises the qualification and training requirements. The proposed changes are intended to contribute significantly to reducing aviation accidents.
Transportation Department -- Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections2008-Dec-088-28527The Department of Transportation seeks comment on rules it is proposing to enhance airline passenger protections in the following ways: by requiring air carriers to adopt contingency plans for lengthy tarmac delays and incorporate them in their contracts of carriage, by requiring air carriers to respond to consumer problems, by deeming the continued operation of a flight that is chronically late to be unfair and deceptive in violation of 49 U.S.C. 41712, by requiring air carriers to publish information on flight delays on their Web sites, and by requiring air carriers to adopt customer service plans, incorporate these into their contracts of carriage, and audit their own compliance with their plans. The Department takes this action on its own initiative in response to the many recent instances when passengers have been subject to waits on airport tarmacs for very long periods and also in response to the ongoing high incidence of flight delays.
Transportation Department -- OST Technical Corrections2008-Jun-128-12108DOT is amending a number of its regulations to reflect reorganization of some elements of DOT and the move of DOT's Headquarters site in Washington, DC. This action is taken on DOT's initiative.
Transportation Department -- Removal of Regulations Allowing for Polished Frost on Wings of Airplanes2008-May-088-10246The FAA is proposing to remove provisions in its regulations that allow for operations with ``polished frost'' (i.e., frost polished to make it smooth) on the wings of airplanes operated under parts 125, 135, and certain airplanes operated under part 91. The rule would increase safety by not allowing operations with polished frost, which the FAA has determined increases the risk of unsafe flight.
Transportation Department -- Extended Operations (ETOPS) of Multi Engine Airplanes2008-Feb-158-2879The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is delaying the compliance date for certain sections of a final rule, published January 16, 2007, that established regulations governing the design, operation, and maintenance of certain airplanes operated on flights that fly over 180 minutes from an adequate airport. The extension of the compliance date is necessary to give operators additional time to gain a comprehensive understanding of Extended Operations (ETOPS) requirements, develop training and procedures, and implement safety measures established in the final rule. In addition, the regulatory text for certain sections is amended to reflect this delay of compliance dates.
Transportation Department -- Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 108-Mitsubishi MU-2B Series Airplane Special Training, Experience, and Operating Requirements2008-Feb-0608-398This Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) creates new pilot training, experience, and operating requirements for persons operating the Mitsubishi MU-2B series airplane (MU-2B). These requirements follow an increased accident and incident rate in the MU- 2B and are based on a Federal Aviation Administration safety evaluation of the MU-2B. This SFAR mandates additional training, experience, and operating requirements to improve the level of operational safety for the MU-2B.
Transportation Department -- Service Difficulty Reports; Correcting Amendment2007-Sep-187-18350This action removes an erroneous reference to a section that appears in the applicability section of operating requirements for commuter and on-demand operations. The intent of this action is to ensure that the regulations are clear and accurate.
Transportation Department -- Area Navigation (RNAV) and Miscellaneous Amendments2007-Jun-077-10609The FAA is amending its regulations to reflect technological advances that support area navigation (RNAV); include provisions on the use of suitable RNAV systems for navigation; amend certain terms for consistency with those of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO); remove reference to the middle marker in certain sections because a middle marker is no longer operationally required; clarify airspace terminology; and incorporate by reference obstacle departure procedures into Federal regulations. The changes will facilitate the use of new navigation reference sources, enable advancements in technology, and increase efficiency of the National Airspace System.
Transportation Department -- Extended Operations (ETOPS) of Multi-Engine Airplanes2007-May-107-8810The Federal Aviation Administration is correcting a final rule published in the Federal Register on January 16, 2007 (72 FR 1808). That final rule applied to air carrier (part 121), commuter, and on- demand (part 135) turbine powered multi-engine airplanes used in passenger-carrying, and some all-cargo, extended-range operations. This amendment adds the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Information Collection Control Number indicating approval of the information collection requirements of the final rule. This amendment also makes three corrections: In part 135, it corrects the dual maintenance paragraph to conform to part 121 and deletes a redundant defining of ``adequate airport''; in part 121 it corrects the rule language applicable to those persons who must accomplish and certify by signature the completion of ETOPS tasks; and in parts 121 and 135 it corrects the hours required for notification of maintenance problems based on an earlier FAA rulemaking. None of these changes is substantive, but will clarify the final rule for the affected public.
Transportation Department -- Extended Operations (ETOPS) of Multi-Engine Airplanes2007-Feb-1507-704The Federal Aviation Administration is correcting a final rule published in the Federal Register on January 16, 2007 (72 FR 1808). That final rule applied to air carrier (part 121), commuter, and on- demand (part 135) turbine powered multi-engine airplanes used in passenger-carrying, and some all-cargo, extended-range operations. This amendment corrects the rule language applicable to dual maintenance and formatting of a Part 1 definition and section of Appendix G. None of these changes is substantive, but will clarify the FAA's intent of the final rule for the public.
Transportation Department -- Extended Operations (ETOPS) of Multi-Engine Airplanes2007-Jan-1607-39This final rule applies to air carrier (part 121), commuter, and on-demand (part 135) turbine powered multi-engine airplanes used in extended-range operations. However, all-cargo operations in airplanes with more than two engines of both part 121 and part 135 are exempted from the majority of this rule. Today's rule establishes regulations governing the design, operation and maintenance of certain airplanes operated on flights that fly long distances from an adequate airport. This final rule codifies current FAA policy, industry best practices and recommendations, as well as international standards designed to ensure long-range flights will continue to operate safely. To ease the transition for current operators, this rule includes delayed compliance dates for certain ETOPS requirements.
Transportation Department -- Use of Certain Portable Oxygen Concentrator Devices Onboard Aircraft2007-Jan-127-339The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is making minor technical changes to a final rule published in the Federal Register on July 12, 2005 (70 FR 40156). That final rule created Special Federal Aviation Regulation 106 (SFAR 106). In that final rule the FAA inadvertently failed to make conforming amendments to additionally apply the SFAR to parts 125 and 135 as proposed, and to include references in those parts to the existence of SFAR 106 published in part 121.
Transportation Department -- Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. XX-Mitsubishi MU-2B Series Airplane Special Training, Experience, and Operating Experience2007-Jan-036-22438The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is revising its proposed Special Federal Aviation Regulation that would be applicable to the Mitsubishi MU-2B series airplane. As a result of comments received on the notice of proposed rulemaking, the FAA is amending the proposal to add certain definitions related to pilot experience into the Mitsubishi training program. This document seeks public comment on those changes.
Transportation Department -- Submitting Airline Data Via the Internet2006-Dec-206-21599The Department of Transportation proposes that U.S. and foreign air carriers submit their required recurrent financial, traffic, operational and consumer reports via the internet (e-filing). The proposed action would enhance security of the data, eliminate air carriers' mailing costs, eliminate the need for the Department to keypunch hardcopy data, and provide reporting air carriers with immediate notification and a receipt from the Department that the report was received.
Transportation Department -- Additional Types of Child Restraint Systems That May Be Furnished and Used on Aircraft; Corrections2006-Oct-106-16622The Federal Aviation Administration published a final rule in the Federal Register on July 14, 2006 (71 FR 40003). The final rule allowed the use of child restraint systems that the FAA approves under the aviation standards of Technical Standard Order C-100b, Child Restraint Systems, or under its certification regulations regarding the approval of materials, parts, processes, and appliances. That final rule contained two non-substantive typographical errors in the rule text of two sections. This document corrects the final regulations by revising these sections.
Transportation Department -- Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. XX-Mitsubishi MU-2B Series Airplane Special Training, Experience, and Operating Requirements2006-Sep-2806-8310The FAA is proposing a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) applicable to the Mitsubishi MU-2B series airplane that would create new pilot training, experience, and operating requirements. Following an increased accident and incident rate in the MU-2B series airplane, the FAA conducted a safety evaluation of the MU-2B series airplane and found that changes in the training and operating requirements for that airplane are needed. These proposed regulations would mandate additional operating requirements and improve pilot training for the MU-2B series airplane.
Transportation Department -- Use of Additional Portable Oxygen Concentrator Devices Onboard Aircraft2006-Sep-1206-7597This action amends Special Federal Aviation Regulation 106 (SFAR 106), Use of Certain Portable Oxygen Concentrator Devices Onboard Aircraft, to allow for the use of the AirSep Corporation's FreeStyle, SeQual Technologies' Eclipse, and Respironics Inc.'s EverGo portable oxygen concentrator (POC) devices onboard aircraft, provided certain conditions in the SFAR are met. This action is necessary to allow all POC devices deemed acceptable by the FAA to be available to the traveling public in need of oxygen therapy for use in air commerce. When this rule becomes effective, there will be a total of five different POC devices the FAA finds acceptable for use onboard aircraft during travel, and passengers will be able to carry these devices onboard the aircraft and use them with the approval of the aircraft operator.
Transportation Department -- Canadian Charter Air Taxi Operators2006-Aug-236-13664DOT is updating its rule concerning Canadian charter air taxis to make the rule consistent with the 1995 U.S.-Canada bilateral aviation agreement. When promulgated in 1981, the rule comported with the 1974 U.S.-Canada bilateral aviation agreement governing non- scheduled air services. However, the rule has not been updated to reflect the more liberal 1995 bilateral. Consequently, the rule, in its current form, contains certain restrictions on Canadian charter air taxis that are contrary to the 1995 bilateral. This final rule eliminates or amends those provisions. It also makes several other technical changes to the rule and adds a provision making it clear that Canadian charter air taxis are exempt from the statutory requirement of foreign air carriers to file family assistance plans.
Transportation Department -- Additional Types of Child Restraint Systems That May Be Furnished and Used on Aircraft2006-Jul-146-11112The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is amending certain operating regulations to allow passengers or aircraft operators to furnish and use more types of Child Restraint Systems (CRS) on aircraft. This rule will allow the use of CRSs that the FAA approves under the aviation standards of Technical Standard Order C-100b, Child Restraint Systems. In addition, the rule will allow the use of CRSs approved by the FAA under its certification regulations regarding the approval of materials, parts, processes, and appliances. Current rules allow passengers and aircraft operators to furnish and use CRSs that meet Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 213 (FMVSS No. 213), or the standards of the United Nations, or that are approved by a foreign government. The intended effect of this regulation is to increase the number of CRS options that are available for use on aircraft, while maintaining safe standards for certification and approval. In addition, more CRS options may increase the voluntary use of CRSs on aircraft and, in turn, improve children's safety.
Transportation Department -- Disqualification for Airman and Airman Medical Certificate Holders Based on Alcohol Violations or Refusals To Submit to Drug and Alcohol Testing2006-Jun-216-9814This final rule changes the airman medical certification standards to disqualify an airman based on an alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater breath alcohol concentration (BAC) or a refusal to take a drug or alcohol test required by the Department of Transportation (DOT) or a DOT agency. Further, this rulemaking standardizes the time period for reporting refusals and certain test results to the FAA, and requires employers to report pre-employment and return-to-duty test refusals. It also amends the airman medical certification requirements to allow suspension or revocation of airman medical certificates for pre-employment and return-to-duty test refusals. Finally, we have updated the regulations to recognize current breath alcohol testing technology. These amendments are necessary to ensure that persons who engage in substance abuse do not operate aircraft or perform contract air traffic control duties until it is determined that these individuals can safely exercise the privileges of their certificates.
Transportation Department -- Actual Control of U.S. Air Carriers2006-May-0506-4227The Department is seeking additional comments on our proposal to clarify policies that it may use to evaluate air carriers' citizenship during initial and continuing fitness reviews. Our proposal would affect how we determine ``actual control'' of the carrier in situations where the foreign investor's home country has an open skies air services agreement with the United States, and permits reciprocal investment opportunities in its own national air carriers for U.S. investors. We continue to believe that our proposed policy would remove unnecessary restrictions on U.S. air carriers' access to the global capital market without compromising the statutory requirement that U.S. citizens remain in actual control of such carriers. We are issuing a supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking (SNPRM) because, after reviewing comments submitted on the NPRM and in consultation with other Executive Branch agencies, we have decided to strengthen the proposal in several areas. We have revised the proposed rule further to ensure that U.S. citizens will have actual control of the air carrier. We are also mindful of the strong interest in this proposal expressed by members of Congress. This SNPRM will furnish Congress the opportunity to review the proposal in its refined form, and to undertake a more informed assessment of its likely consequences. Our NPRM proposal would allow for delegation to foreign investors of decision-making authority regarding commercial issues, but in the areas of organizational documents, safety, security, and the Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF) program the NPRM would not permit these delegations. In a key refinement of our original proposal, we now propose in this SNPRM to require that any such delegation of authority to foreign interests by the U.S. citizen majority owners be revocable. We are proposing this change to ensure that, notwithstanding their ability to delegate decision-making authority over certain commercial matters (as described in the NPRM) to foreign investor interests, the U.S. voting shareholders of a U.S. airline will retain actual control of the airline. We originally proposed to reserve exclusively to U.S. citizens decisions relating to organizational documents, safety, security, and CRAF. In another refinement, in keeping with suggestions received from the Departments of Homeland Security and Defense as well as the Federal Aviation Administration, we are now proposing to broaden the scope of the decision-making that must remain under the actual control of U.S. citizens. The aspects of control of safety and security decisions would no longer be limited to those implementing FAA and TSA safety and security regulations, but would cover safety and security decisions generally. Similarly, the proposed control of CRAF decisions would be expanded to cover all national defense airlift commitments. Our proposed expansion of the coverage of these three areas will ensure that all critical elements of a carrier's decision-making that could impact safety, security, and national defense airlift are fully covered, and that our review of a carrier's compliance with these requirements will not be unduly narrow. We tentatively conclude that, as modified, this proposal will eliminate unnecessary and anachronistic limitations on the ability of eligible foreign minority investors to participate in the commercial decision-making at a U.S. airline in which they have made an otherwise statutorily-permitted investment. At the same time, it should eliminate any doubt that the voting stockholders (75 percent of whom are U.S. citizens) and the board of directors (two-thirds of whom are U.S. citizens) will retain full control over decisions regarding safety, security, and contributions to our national defense airlift capability, and that those U.S. citizens also retain ``actual control'' of the carrier as a whole as required by statute.
Transportation Department -- Service Difficulty Reports2005-Dec-2905-24536The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is withdrawing a delayed final rule published on September 15, 2000. That final rule would have amended the reporting requirements for certificate holders concerning failures, malfunctions, and defects of aircraft, aircraft engines, systems, and components. We are withdrawing this rule to allow the FAA time to re-examine the service difficulty report (SDR) program and consider the comments received since the delayed final rule was published. In this action we are also adopting several amendments that improve the functioning of the SDR program.
Transportation Department -- Price Advertising2005-Dec-1405-23841The Department is considering amending its rule on price advertising, and it is seeking comment on several options. Under the existing rule, the Department considers any advertisement that states a price for air transportation that is not the total price the consumer will pay to be unfair or deceptive in violation of the statute under which this provision was adopted in 1984. Although it has not amended the codified rule, in practice the Department has long allowed an exception to it for certain taxes, fees, and other charges that are imposed by a government entity. As a matter of prosecutorial discretion, the Department does not take enforcement action against any advertisement that omits these charges from the quoted fare, provided that the charges are collected on a per-passenger basis and are not ad valorem in nature, and provided further that the advertisement clearly indicates the existence and amount of these charges so that consumers can easily calculate the total fare. The Department has consistently prohibited sellers of air transportation from breaking out other cost elements, such as fuel surcharges, from the advertised fare. Although the Department has denied a recent request to allow separate listing of the fuel surcharges that carriers are adopting in response to soaring fuel costs, the Department has also decided that the time is ripe after 21 years of marketing innovations for a reexamination of the fare- advertising rule and its long-time enforcement policy. Therefore, the Department is asking interested persons to comment on four alternative options: Maintain the current practice either with or without codifying all of its elements in the rule; end the exception for government- imposed charges and enforce the rule as written; revise the rule to eliminate most or all requirements for airfare advertisements but to require that consumers be apprised of the total purchase price before the purchase is made; or eliminate the full-fare advertising rule in its entirety.
Transportation Department -- Actual Control of U.S. Air Carriers2005-Nov-0705-22056The Department is seeking comments on a proposal to clarify policies that may be used during initial and continuing fitness reviews of U.S. carriers when citizenship is at issue. We propose to add a new section to 14 CFR part 399 that clarifies how the Department will interpret ``actual control'' of a U.S. air carrier during fitness reviews. This proposal will affect how we interpret the circumstances influencing a determination of ``actual control,'' allowing easier access to foreign capital for U.S. airlines. We are also proposing minor amendments to 14 CFR part 204 to reference the new section and update existing language in part 204.
Transportation Department -- Establishment of Organization Designation Authorization Program2005-Oct-1305-20470This final rule establishes the Organization Designation Authorization (ODA) program. The ODA program expands the scope of approved tasks available to organizational designees; increases the number of organizations eligible for organizational designee authorizations; and establishes a more comprehensive, systems-based approach to managing designated organizations. This final rule also sets phaseout dates for the current organizational designee programs, the participants in which will be transitioned into the ODA program. This program is needed as the framework for the FAA to standardize the operation and oversight of organizational designees. The effect of this program will be to increase the efficiency with which the FAA appoints and oversees designee organizations, and allow the FAA to concentrate its resources on the most safety-critical matters.
Transportation Department -- Service Difficulty Reports2005-Sep-1405-18176The Federal Aviation Administration is proposing to withdraw a final rule published on September 15, 2000 that would have amended the reporting requirements for certificate holders concerning failures, malfunctions, and defects of aircraft, aircraft engines, systems, and components. The effective date of this final rule has been delayed several times and is now January 31, 2006. We are proposing to withdraw this rule to allow the FAA time to re-examine the service difficulty report (SDR) program based on comments received and other developments since the final rule was published. We are also proposing several amendments that improve the existing SDR program because they did not receive significant comment when proposed in the final rule.
Transportation Department -- FAA-Approved Child Restraint Systems2005-Aug-2605-16782The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is amending its operating regulations to allow the use, on board aircraft, of Child Restraint Systems (CRSs) that are approved by the FAA through a Type Certificate, Supplemental Type Certificate, or Technical Standard Order. Current FAA regulations do not allow the use of CRSs other than those that meet specific standards for the automobile environment. The intended effect of this regulation is to reduce the regulatory burden to industry while maintaining or increasing safety.
Transportation Department -- Use of Certain Portable Oxygen Concentrator Devices Onboard Aircraft2005-Jul-1205-13664This Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) will permit passengers to use certain portable oxygen concentrator (POC) devices on aircraft, provided certain conditions in this SFAR are satisfied. The SFAR includes a POC preparation requirement for carry-on baggage transport, and a battery-packaging standard necessary for the safe carriage of extra POC batteries in carry-on baggage. This rulemaking action is necessary to address the travelling needs of people on oxygen therapy.
Transportation Department -- Elimination of Commuter Air Carrier Registrations2005-May-1605-9655This action amends the regulations governing air taxi operators and commuter air carriers to eliminate the requirement that commuter air carriers file initial and amended registration forms. The information provided on such forms is duplicative of information that commuter air carriers are separately required to file under other regulations. Accordingly, this amendment simplifies the process of applying for and maintaining commuter air carrier authority. This action also makes conforming amendments to other rules affected by the amendment, as well as to make other minor administrative, editorial, clarifying, and organizational changes to rules applicable to air taxi operators and commuter air carriers.
Transportation Department -- Revisions to Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations2005-Feb-2805-3726The FAA proposes to amend the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) and digital flight data recorder (DFDR) regulations for certain air carriers, operators, and aircraft manufacturers. This proposed rule would increase the duration of CVR and flight data recorder (FDR) recordings; increase the data recording rate of certain DFDR parameters; require physical separation of the DFDR and CVR; improve the reliability of the power supply to both the CVR and DFDR; and if data-link communication equipment is installed, require that all data- link communications received on an aircraft be recorded. This proposal is based on recommendations issued by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) following the investigations of several accidents and incidents, and includes other revisions that the FAA has determined are necessary. The proposed improvements to the CVR and DFDR systems are intended to improve the quality and quantity of information recorded and increase the potential for retaining important information needed during accident and incident investigations.
Transportation Department -- Disqualification for Airman and Medical Certificate Holders Based on Alcohol Violations and Refusals to Submit to Drug or Alcohol Testing2004-Dec-1404-27216The FAA proposes to amend the airman medical certification standards to disqualify an airman based on an alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater breath alcohol concentration (BAC) or a refusal to take a drug or alcohol test required by the Department of Transportation (DOT) or a DOT agency. Further, the FAA proposes to standardize the time period for reporting refusals and certain test results to the FAA, and to require employers to report pre-employment and return-to-duty test refusals. We also propose to amend the airman certification requirements to allow suspension or revocation of airman certificates for pre-employment and return-to-duty test refusals. Finally, we propose to amend the regulations to recognize current breath alcohol testing technology. These amendments are necessary to ensure that persons who engage in substance abuse do not operate aircraft or perform contract air traffic control tower operations until it is determined that these individuals can operate safely.
Transportation Department -- Elimination of Commuter Air Carrier Registrations2004-Oct-2804-23859The Department proposes to amend the regulations governing air taxi operators and commuter air carriers to eliminate the requirement that commuter air carriers file initial and amended registration forms. The information provided on such forms is duplicative of information that commuter air carriers are separately required to file under other regulations. Accordingly, the proposed amendment will simplify the process of applying for and maintaining commuter air carrier authority. The Department also proposes to make conforming amendments to other rules affected by the proposed amendment, as well as to make other minor administrative, editorial, clarifying, and organizational changes to rules applicable to air taxi operators and commuter air carriers.
Transportation Department -- Use of Certain Portable Oxygen Concentrator Devices Onboard Aircraft2004-Jul-1404-15969This action proposes to address the traveling needs of persons on oxygen therapy by permitting the use of certain portable oxygen concentrator devices on aircraft, providing certain conditions are satisfied.
Transportation Department -- Aircraft Assembly Placard Requirements2004-Jun-2904-14630This action amends the passenger information rules for scheduled air carriers. It requires a notice or placard informing passengers of the name of the country in which the aircraft was finally assembled. These changes are necessary to respond to an Act of Congress requiring the notice or placard be available to passengers no later than June 12, 2005.
Transportation Department -- Establishment of Organization Designation Authorization Procedures2004-Jan-2104-1133The FAA proposes to create an Organization Designation Authorization (ODA) program. This program would expand the approval functions of FAA organizational designees; standardize these functions to increase efficiency; and expand eligibility for organizational designees, including organizations not eligible under the current rules. In addition, as the FAA transitions to the ODA program, the agency would phase-out the Delegation Option Authorization (DOA), Designated Alteration Station Authorization (DAS), SFAR 36 authorization, and the Organizational Designated Airworthiness Representative (ODAR). These actions are necessary to provide the FAA with a more efficient process to delegate certain tasks to external organizations. The intended effect of these actions is to preserve and increase aviation safety.
Transportation Department -- Aging Airplane Safety2003-Dec-1203-30645The Federal Aviation Administration is making minor technical changes to its aging aircraft regulations as a result of an interim final rule with a request for comments published in the Federal Register on December 6, 2002. This final rule requires airplanes covered by the aging aircraft regulations to undergo inspections and records reviews by the Administrator after their 14th year in service and at specified internals thereafter. As part of this final rule, the FAA inadvertently did not make conforming amendments to an applicability section to reflect the existence of two new sections and the redesignation of an existing section. In addition to these changes, an error exists in the heading of a new section. These technical changes are necessary to keep our regulations clear, accurate and current. The intended effect is to make our regulations easier for the public and regulated industry to use. None of these amendments will impose any extra burden or restrictions on persons or organizations affected by these regulations.
Transportation Department -- Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36, Development of Major Repair Data2003-Nov-1903-28888The Federal Aviation Administration amends and extends Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 36 (SFAR 36). This final rule extends the SFAR 36 expiration date five years. Also, in this final rule, the FAA makes a technical amendment to Section No. 4 (Application) of SFAR 36. SFAR 36 allows holders of authorized repair station or aircraft operating certificates to approve aircraft products or articles for return to service after completing major repairs using self-developed repair data not directly approved by the FAA. Extension of the regulation continues to provide, for those who qualify, an alternative to gaining direct FAA approval of major repair data on a case-by-case basis. The technical amendment to Section No. 4 (Application) is necessary to accurately reflect the appropriate FAA office to which applications should be submitted.
Transportation Department -- Extended Operations (ETOPS) of Multi-engine Airplanes2003-Nov-1403-28407The FAA proposes to issue regulations governing the design, maintenance, and operation of airplanes and engines for flights that go beyond certain distances from an adequate airport. This proposal would extend some requirements that previously applied only to two-engine airplanes to airplanes with more than two-engines. The proposed rule implements existing policy, industry best practices and recommendations, and international standards to ensure that long-range flights will operate safely.
Transportation Department -- Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii2003-Oct-2303-26836This final rule continues the existing safety requirements in Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71 (SFAR 71) and eliminates the termination date for SFAR 71. The procedural, operational, and equipment safety requirements of SFAR 71 will continue to apply to Parts 91, 121, and 135 air tour operators in Hawaii. SFAR 71 does not apply to operations conducted under part 121 in airplanes with a passenger-seating configuration of more than 30 seats and a payload capacity of more than 7,500 pounds or to flights conducted in gliders or hot air balloons.
Transportation Department -- Digital Flight Data Recorder Requirements-Changes to Recording Specifications and Additional Exceptions; Correction2003-Sep-1503-23505This document makes corrections to the correction to the final rule published in the Federal Register on August 20, 2003 (68 FR 50069). This document makes a minor change to a section number that was changed in the previous correction to the final rule. In the first correction document, we inserted a corrected Parameter 15 into the appendixes for part 121 and part 125 in the final rule. We inadvertently cited Sec. 135.152(j) in the ``Seconds per sampling interval'' column when we should have cited Sec. 121.344(f).
Transportation Department -- Digital Flight Data Recorder Requirements-Changes to Recording Specifications and Additional Exceptions; Correction2003-Aug-2003-21329This document makes corrections to the final rule published in the Federal Register on July 18, 2003. This document makes some minor corrections and it also adds Parameter 15 to the document under parts 121 and 125, and changes the resolution in Parameter 15 by 0.1%.
Transportation Department -- Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii2003-Aug-0803-20277This action proposes to continue the existing safety requirements in Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 71 (SFAR 71) and eliminate the termination date for SFAR 71. Currently, SFAR 71 is a final rule that will expire on October 26, 2003. Since 1994, the FAA has extended SFAR 71 for two 3-year periods. The procedural, operational, and equipment safety requirements of SFAR 71 would continue to apply to parts 91, 121, and 135 air tour operators in Hawaii. SFAR 71 does not apply to operations conducted under part 121 in airplanes with a passenger-seating configuration of more than 30 seats and a payload capacity of more than 7,500 pounds or to flights conducted in gliders or hot air balloons.
Transportation Department -- Preemption in Air Transportation; Policy Statement Amendment2003-Jul-2403-18589This action ends a rulemaking commenced by the Civil Aeronautics Board in 1979, in which it announced interim policies to implement provisions of the Airline Deregulation Act of 1978 dealing with federal preemption. The Department of Transportation, which succeeded to various Civil Aeronautics Board functions, has concluded that the interim policy statement is of limited current value. Its major issue--continued intrastate economic regulation of air carriers-- has long since been resolved. Its remaining subjects continue to evolve and are more appropriately addressed on a case-by-case basis rather than by a statement of general policy. The interim final policy is accordingly removed. The Department of Transportation will continue to monitor developments and to offer the proper interpretation of the statute's preemption provision in appropriate fact-specific circumstances.
Transportation Department -- Digital Flight Data Recorder Requirements-Changes to Recording Specifications and Additional Exceptions2003-Jul-1803-18269This action amends the flight data recorder regulations by expanding the recording specifications of certain data parameters for specified airplanes, and by adding aircraft models to the lists of aircraft excepted from the 1997 regulations. In addition, this rule corrects specifications in an operating rule appendix that were inadvertently omitted in previous actions. These changes are necessary to allow the continued operation of certain aircraft that are unable to meet the existing recorder criteria using installed equipment. The changes are also necessary for certain aircraft for which the cost to retrofit under 1997 regulatory changes would be cost prohibitive.
Transportation Department -- DOD Commercial Air Carrier Evaluators2003-Jul-1003-17459This final rule clarifies existing regulations as they apply to Department of Defense (DOD) commercial air carrier evaluators. These amendments are necessary to clarify DOD's congressionally mandated cockpit evaluation mission and authority for the aviation security community and for industry. DOD's Air Mobility Command (AMC) will create and issue a new credential to permit DOD commercial air carrier evaluators uninterrupted access to the cockpit for evaluations. These amendments explicitly clarify existing DOD legal authority and responsibilities.
Transportation Department -- Special Operating Rules for the Conduct of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) Area Navigation (RNAV) Operations Using Global Positioning Systems (GPS) in Alaska2003-Mar-2103-6749Under Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) No. 97, the FAA allows the use of Global Positioning System/Wide Area Augmentation Systems for the en route portion of flights on routes in Alaska outside the operational service volume of ground based navigation aids. The use of aircraft navigation equipment other than area navigation systems, that only permit navigation to or from ground-based navigation stations, often results in less than optimal routes or instrument procedures and an inefficient use of airspace. SFAR 97 optimizes routes and instrument procedures and provides for a more efficient use of airspace. Further, the FAA anticipates that it will result in an associated increase in flight safety.
Transportation Department -- Special Operating Rules for the Conduct of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) Area Navigation (RNAV) Operations Using Global Positioning Systems (GPS) in Alaska2003-Jan-2403-1601Under this Special Federal Aviation Regulation, the FAA proposes to allow the use of Global Positioning System/Wide Area Augmentation Systems for the en route portion of flights on routes in Alaska outside the operational service volume of ground based navigation aids. The use of aircraft navigation equipment other than area navigation systems, that only permit navigation to or from ground- based navigation stations, often results in less than optimal routes or instrument procedures and an inefficient use of airspace. This SFAR would optimize routes and instrument procedures and provide for a more efficient use of airspace. Further, it would result in an associated increase in flight safety.
Transportation Department -- Area Navigation (RNAV) and Miscellaneous Amendments2002-Dec-1702-31150The FAA is proposing to amend its regulations to reflect technological advances that support area navigation (RNAV); make certain terms consistent with those of the International Civil Aviation Organization; remove the middle marker as a required component of instrument landing systems; and clarify airspace terminology. The proposed changes are intended to facilitate the transition from ground- based navigation to new reference sources, enable advancements in technology, and increase efficiency of the National Airspace System.
Transportation Department -- Corrosion Prevention and Control Program2002-Oct-0302-24932This document proposes to require that the maintenance or inspection programs for all airplanes operated under part 121 of Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations, all U.S.-registered multiengine airplanes operated in common carriage by foreign air carriers or foreign persons under 14 CFR part 129, and all multiengine airplanes used in scheduled operations under 14 CFR part 135 include FAA-approved corrosion prevention and control programs. Such programs are needed because existing maintenance and inspection programs may not provide comprehensive, systematic measures to prevent and control corrosion. These proposals form a part of the FAA's response to legislation emanating from the Aging Aircraft Safety Act of 1991. These actions are intended to control the detrimental effects of corrosion and the resulting airplane structural material loss.
Transportation Department -- Amendment to the Definitions of Revenue and Nonrevenue Passengers2002-Sep-1802-23614The Office of the Secretary and the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) are revising the Department's definitions of revenue passenger and nonrevenue passenger to specify that a passenger traveling on a ticket or voucher received as compensation for denied boarding or as settlement of a consumer complaint is considered to be a revenue passenger. The revised definitions will also be added to other regulatory provisions. Based on this final rule, the definitions will be in harmony with the definitions of revenue and nonrevenue passenger adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Harmonizing DOT's and ICAO's definitions will relieve air carriers from being required to keep two sets of traffic enplanement statistics--one for reporting to ICAO and one for reporting to DOT. This action is taken at DOT's initiative.
Transportation Department -- Revisions to Digital Flight Data Recorder Requirements2002-Aug-2102-21171This action amends the flight data recorder regulations by expanding the recording ranges for certain data parameters for all covered airplanes. This amendment is necessary because certain airplanes are unable to record certain flight parameters under the existing resolution criteria without undergoing unintended and expensive retrofit.
Transportation Department -- Air Carrier Traffic and Capacity Data By Nonstop Segment and On-Flight Market2002-Jul-3002-15978The Department of Transportation is modifying the T-100/T- 100(f) Traffic Reporting System. For traffic reporting purposes, the distinction between large and small aircraft is removed. All U.S. certificated and commuter air carriers and all foreign air carriers that operate to the United States will report their traffic movements in the T-100/T-100(f) Traffic Reporting System regardless of the size of aircraft used. Joint-service operations will be reported by the operating carrier. This rule modifies the current T-100 Reporting System to require U.S. carriers to report the detailed market and segment information for all their military, domestic all-cargo, and domestic charter flights. The detailed statistics from military operations will be withheld from public disclosure. The submission of Form 41 Supplemental T-1, T-2, and T-3 schedules is eliminated. The Department is requiring U.S. carriers that submit Form 41 financial reports to submit for each reported aircraft type, total aircraft hours, fuel consumed, and aircraft days assigned to service. Currently, there is a lack of market and segment data for domestic all-cargo, domestic charter and small aircraft operations. These changes will eliminate the data gaps for these rapidly growing segments of the air transportation industry.
Transportation Department -- Removal of Expired Special Federal Aviation Regulations2002-Mar-0102-4846The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is making minor technical changes to its regulations by removing Special Federal Aviation Regulations (SFARs) that have expired, as well as references to them, from the Code of Federal Regulations. None of these changes are substantive in nature since the regulations in question have expired and are not currently in effect. This technical amendment is necessary to update our regulations. The rule will not impose any additional burden or restriction on persons or organizations affected by these regulations.
Transportation Department -- Civil Aviation Security Rules2002-Feb-2202-4081This rulemaking transfers the FAA's rules governing civil aviation security to TSA. This rulemaking also amends those rules to enhance security as required by recent legislation. This rulemaking also requires additional qualifications, training, and testing of individuals who screen persons and property that are carried in passenger aircraft. It is intended to improve the quality of screening conducted by aircraft operators and foreign air carriers. This rule is being adopted to improve the qualifications of individuals performing screening, and thereby to improve the level of security in air transportation. This will help ensure a smooth transition of aviation security from the FAA to TSA, and will avoid disruptions in air transportation due to any shortage of qualified screeners.
Transportation Department -- Air Carrier Traffic and Capacity Data by Nonstop Segment and On-Flight Market2001-Aug-2801-21457The Department of Transportation is considering modifying the T-100/T-100(f) Traffic Reporting System. Joint-service operations would be reported by the operating carrier. Small certificated, commuter, and all-cargo air carriers would report their air traffic activity under the T-100 Traffic Reporting System instead of Form 298-C Schedules A-1, E-1, and T-1; and Form 291-A. The current T-100 Reporting System would be modified to require U.S. carriers to report the detailed market and segment information for all their military, domestic all-cargo, and domestic charter flights. The Form 41 Supplemental T-1, T-2, and T-3 schedules would be eliminated. Foreign air carriers would be required to report on the T-100(f) all flights to/from the United States thus, eliminating the small aircraft reporting exclusion. The Department would require U.S. carriers to submit total aircraft hours for each reported aircraft type, fuel consumed by aircraft type and aircraft days assigned to service. Currently, there is a lack of market and segment data for domestic all-cargo, domestic charter and small aircraft operations. The proposed changes are designed to fill the data gaps for these rapidly growing segments in the air transportation industry.
Transportation Department -- Service Difficulty Reports2000-Oct-1100-25951The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is making minor technical changes to a final rule published in the Federal Register on September 15, 2000 (65 FR 56192). That final rule amends the reporting requirements for air carriers and certificated domestic and foreign repair station operators concerning failures malfunctions, and defects of aircraft engines, systems, and components. In that final rule the FAA neglected to make conforming amendments to sections not amended by the final rule.
Transportation Department -- Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii2000-Sep-2900-25139On August 21, 2000, the FAA proposed to extend for 3 years Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) 71, which established certain procedural, operational, and equipment requirements for air tour operators in the State of Hawaii. This final rule, which adopts the proposals, will provide additional time for the agency to complete and issue a notice of proposed rulemaking for a national rule that would apply to all air tour operators. The FAA anticipates that the national rule, when finalized, would replace SFAR 71, which would then be rescinded. Thus the FAA is extending SFAR 71 for another 3 years to maintain the current requirements for the safe operation of air tours in the airspace over the State of Hawaii and provide the additional time necessary to issue the national rule.
Transportation Department -- Service Difficulty Reports2000-Sep-1500-23676The FAA amends reporting requirements for air carriers and certificated domestic and foreign repair station operators concerning failures, malfunctions, and defects of aircraft, aircraft engines, systems, and components. This action was prompted by an internal Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) review of the effectiveness of the reporting system and by air carrier industry concern over the quality of the data being reported. The objective of this final rule is to improve the reporting system to effectively collect and disseminate clear and concise safety information to the aviation industry.
Transportation Department -- Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii2000-Aug-2300-21631On October 23, 1997, the FAA extended Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) 71, which established certain procedural, operational, and equipment requirements for air tour operators in the State of Hawaii, for 3 years. The purpose of this extension was to provide additional time for the agency to complete and issue a notice of proposed rulemaking that would apply to all air tour operators. The FAA anticipates that this national rule, when finalized, would replace SFAR 71, which would then be rescinded. The FAA proposes to extend SFAR 71 for another 3 years, which would provide the additional time necessary to issue the proposal addressing commercial air tour safety standards and maintain the current regulatory requirements for the safe operation of air tours in the airspace over the State of Hawaii.
Transportation Department -- Amendment to the Definitions of Revenue and Nonrevenue Passengers2000-Aug-2200-21313The Office of the Secretary proposes to revise its definitions of revenue passenger and nonrevenue passenger in 14 CFR 241.03 to specify that a passenger traveling on a ticket or voucher received as compensation for denied boarding or as settlement of a consumer complaint is considered to be a revenue passenger. The revised definitions will be added to 14 CFR parts 217 and 298. The definitions will be in harmony with the definitions of revenue and non revenue passenger adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Harmonizing of DOT's and ICAO's definitions will prevent air carriers from being required to keep two sets of traffic enplanement statistics--one for reporting to ICAO and one for reporting to DOT. This action is taken at DOT's initiative.
Transportation Department -- Rules of Practice in Proceedings2000-Feb-0900-2554The Department is finalizing, with certain exceptions, a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) (62 FR 5094, Feb. 3, 1997) to revise 14 CFR part 302 in order to eliminate unnecessary verbiage and obsolete provisions and to make technical changes to make the rules current. The final rule also includes certain changes implementing the electronic filing component of the Department's Docket Management System (DMS). All reserved subparts are being removed, and the remaining subparts are being reorganized and renumbered to make their arrangement more logical and to emphasize procedures applicable to the much more commonly used written (as opposed to oral) proceedings. The rulemaking also adds procedures for slot exemptions at high-density airports. The NPRM proposed a number of changes in the time periods for filing responsive documents in licensing cases, which we are adopting. A number of commenters proposed further changes to the filing periods. Based on these comments, we have decided to re-evaluate all of the prescribed time periods in part 302 and will issue a supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking on this matter. In addition, as noted in the preamble to the NPRM, we are also amending those rules in 14 CFR Chapter II containing now incorrect references to specific sections in part 302. Finally, one provision in part 302 is being relocated to part 300, Rules of Conduct in DOT Proceedings Under This Chapter.
Transportation Department -- Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park2000-Feb-0300-2406On December 31, 1996, the FAA published a final rule, Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park. That final rule codified the provisions of Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) No. 50-2, Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP); modified the dimensions of the GCNP Special Flight Rules Area (SFRA); established new and modified existing flight- free zones; established new and modified existing flight corridors; established reporting requirements for commercial sightseeing air carriers operating in the SFRA; prohibited commercial sightseeing operations during certain time periods; and limited the number of aircraft that can be used for commercial sightseeing operations in the SFRA. In February 1997 the FAA delayed the effective date for the new and modified flight-free zones, SFRA modification, and corridors portion of the final rule and reinstated portions of and amended the expiration date of SFAR No. 50-2. However, that action did not affect or delay the implementation of the curfew, aircraft limitations, reporting requirements, or other portions of the rule. That extension was subsequently extended until January 31, 2000. This action further delays the effective date for the flight-free zones, SFRA modification, and corridors portions of the December 31, 19996, final rule until January 31, 20001, and amends the expiration date of SFAR 50-2 until the FAA issues new regulations to substantially restore natural quite in GCNP.
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